Peter I Island

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 68.85°S
  • 90.58°W

  • 1640 m
    5379 ft

  • 390029
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Peter I Island.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Peter I Island.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Peter I Island. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Dort W, 1972. Late Cenozoic volcanism in Antarctica. In: Adie R J (ed) {Antarctic Geol and Geophys}, IUGS Ser-B(1): 645-652.

LeMasurier W E, Thomson J W (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. Washington, D C: Amer Geophys Union, 487 p.

Prestvik T, Barnes C G, Sundvoll B, Duncan R A, 1990. Petrology of Peter I Oy (Peter I Island), west Antarctica. J Volc Geotherm Res, 44: 315-338.

The 11 x 19 km Peter I Island in the Bellingshausen Sea opposite Ellsworth Land is a morphologically youthful shield-like volcano. A 100-m-wide circular crater is found at the summit of the 1750-m-high volcano. The island was discovered by the Russian explorer Bellingshausen in 1821, and extensive summer pack ice and its isolated location far from regular shipping lanes have restricted visits to the island. Dated samples from Peter I Island range from 0.35 to 0.1 million years old (Prestvik et al. 1990). The unmodified volcanic form of the upper part of the volcano argues that parts of it may be Holocene or even historical in age (LeMasurier and Thomson 1990).