Hudson Mountains

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 74.33°S
  • 99.42°W

  • 749 m
    2457 ft

  • 390028
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Hudson Mountains.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Hudson Mountains.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1985 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain     Webber Nunatak
0210 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Ice Core Hudson Mts Subglacial Volcano

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Corr H F J, Vaughan D G, 2008. A recent volcanic eruption beneath the West Antarctica ice sheet. Nature Geosci, 1: 122-125.

Craddock C, Bastien T W, Rutford R H, 1964. Geology of the Jones Mountains area. In: Adie R J (ed) {Antarctic Geol, Proc 1st Internatl Symp Antarctic Geol}, Amsterdam: Elsevier, p 172-187.

Dort W, 1972. Late Cenozoic volcanism in Antarctica. In: Adie R J (ed) {Antarctic Geol and Geophys}, IUGS Ser-B(1): 645-652.

LeMasurier W E, 1972. Volcanic record of Cenozoic glacial history Marie Byrd Land. In: Adie R J (ed) {Antarctic Geol and Geophys}, IUGS Ser-B(1): 251-260.

LeMasurier W E, Thomson J W (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. Washington, D C: Amer Geophys Union, 487 p.

The Hudson Mountains, located along the Walgreen Coast in Antarctica's western Ellsworth Land, contain many only slightly eroded parasitic cones forming nunataks protruding above the Antarctic icecap. The cinder cones apparently rest on three extensively eroded Miocene stratovolcanoes, Teeters Nunatak, Mount Moses, and Mount Manthe. Subaerial basaltic lava flows dominate, but subglacial or subaqueous tuffs and lava flows are also present. A tephra layer from an eruption of a subglacial volcano in the Hudson Mountains was dated from ice thickness at about 200 BCE. The possible presence of steam was reported at one of the Hudson volcanoes during 1974. Satellite data suggested that an eruption of Webber Nunatak took place during 1985, although this has not been confirmed (LeMasurier and Thomson, 1990).