Toney Mountain

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 75.8°S
  • 115.83°W

  • 3595 m
    11792 ft

  • 390026
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Toney Mountain.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Toney Mountain.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Toney Mountain. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Dort W, 1972. Late Cenozoic volcanism in Antarctica. In: Adie R J (ed) {Antarctic Geol and Geophys}, IUGS Ser-B(1): 645-652.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

LeMasurier W E, 1971. Spatial variation in Cenozoic volcanism of Marie Byrd Land and Ellsworth Land. Antarctic J U S, 6: 187-188.

LeMasurier W E, Thomson J W (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. Washington, D C: Amer Geophys Union, 487 p.

Toney Mountain in east-central Marie Byrd Land is a linear, E-W-trending volcanic massif with a 3-km-wide summit caldera and several satellitic cinder cones. A sample from the top of the felsic shield volcano gave a Potassium-Argon date of 0.5 million years ago. Some of the ash bands in the Byrd Station ice core deposited within the past 30,000 years may have been from Toney Mountain, and Holocene activity is possible (LeMasurier and Thomson 1990). Several small cinder cones occur along the crest of the 14-km-long massif, which is almost entirely mantled by glaciers.