Andrus

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 75.8°S
  • 132.33°W

  • 2978 m
    9768 ft

  • 390023
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Andrus.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Andrus.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Andrus. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Dort W, 1972. Late Cenozoic volcanism in Antarctica. In: Adie R J (ed) {Antarctic Geol and Geophys}, IUGS Ser-B(1): 645-652.

Gonzalez-Ferran O, Gonzalez-Bonorino F, 1972. The volcanic ranges of Marie Byrd land between long 100° and 140° W. In: Adie R J (ed) {Antarctic Geol and Geophys}, IUGS Ser-B(1): 261-275.

LeMasurier W E, Thomson J W (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. Washington, D C: Amer Geophys Union, 487 p.

Three coalescing trachytic shield volcanoes with a combined volume of 252 cu km formed during the Miocene along a north-south line in the Ames Range of western Marie Byrd Land. The youngest and best exposed of the three is Mount Andrus, the southernmost volcano, where late-stage volcanic activity resumed during the late-Pleistocene or Holocene (Gonzalez-Ferran and Gonzalez-Bonorino 1972, LeMasurier and Thomson 1990). A distinct 4.5-km-wide caldera truncates the summit of Mount Andrus. Weak fumarolic activity was observed in 1977 at Mount Kauffman, the northernmost volcano, which also has a morphologically distinct 3-km-wide summit caldera.