Berlin

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 76.05°S
  • 136°W

  • 3478 m
    11408 ft

  • 390022
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Berlin.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Berlin.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
8350 BCE ± 1000 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Ar/Ar

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

LeMasurier W E, Thomson J W (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. Washington, D C: Amer Geophys Union, 487 p.

Wilch T I, McIntosh W C, Dunbar N W, 1999. Late Quaternary volcanic activity in Marie Byrd Land: potential 40Ar/39Ar-dated time horizons in West Antarctic ice and marine cores. Geol Soc Amer Bull, 111: 1563-1580.

Mount Berlin consists of two coalescing shield volcanoes, Berlin Crater and Merrem Peak, each with a 2-km-wide summit caldera. Mount Berlin is located in the Flood Range of Marie Byrd Land, near the eastern coast of the Ross Sea. The two calderas are oriented along an east-west line, characteristic of Flood Range volcanoes. The westernmost and highest volcano, Berlin Crater, reaches 3478 m and is located 3.5 km ESE of Merrem Peak caldera. Berlin Crater displays active fumaroles along its western and northern caldera rims, producing the characteristic Antarctic fumarolic ice towers. The youngest dated tephra of a series of tephra layers in glacial ice at Mount Moulton that was attributed to Mount Berlin had an age of about 14.5 +/- 3.8 thousand years (ka), and a younger undated tephra layer was present. A lava flow at the base of an ice cave below a fumarolic ice tower was dated at about 10.3 +/- 2.7 ka.