Melbourne

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 74.35°S
  • 164.7°E

  • 2732 m
    8961 ft

  • 390015
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Melbourne.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Melbourne.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1750 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Dort W, 1972. Late Cenozoic volcanism in Antarctica. In: Adie R J (ed) {Antarctic Geol and Geophys}, IUGS Ser-B(1): 645-652.

Keys J R, McIntosh W C, Kyle P R, 1983. Volcanic activity of Mount Melbourne, Northern Victoria Land. Antarctic J U S, 18: 10-11.

LeMasurier W E, Thomson J W (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. Washington, D C: Amer Geophys Union, 487 p.

Lyon G L, Giggenbach W F, 1974. Geothermal activity in Victoria Land, Antarctica. New Zeal J Geol Geophys, 17: 511-521.

Nathan S, Schulte F J, 1968. Geology and petrology of the Campbell-Aviator Divide, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, Part 1 Post Paleozoic rocks. New Zeal J Geol Geophys, 11: 940-975.

Mount Melbourne is a large undissected stratovolcano along the western coast of the Ross Sea in Antarctica's northern Victoria Land. The 2732-m-high glacier-clad stratovolcano lies at the center of a volcanic field containing both subglacial and subaerial vents that are situated along a dominantly N-S trend. A large number of scoria cones, lava domes, viscous lava flows, and lava fields are exposed at the summit and upper flanks. A number of very young-looking cones are located at the summit and on the flanks. Tephra layers are found within and on top of ice layers, and the most recent eruption may have been only a few hundred years ago. The volcano displays fumarolic activity that is concentrated along a NNE-SSW line cutting through the summit area and along a line of phreatomagmatic craters on the southern rim of the summit crater. Prominent ice towers and pinnacles were formed from steam condensation around fumarolic vents.