The Pleiades

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 72.67°S
  • 165.5°E

  • 3040 m
    9971 ft

  • 390013
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for The Pleiades.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for The Pleiades.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1050 BCE ± 1000 years Unknown Confirmed   Potassium-Argon NE of Mount Pleiones (Taygete Cone)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Kyle P R, 1982. Volcanic geology of the Pleiades, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. In: Craddock C (ed) {Antarctic Geoscience}, Madison: Univ Wisconsin Press, p 747-754.

LeMasurier W E, Thomson J W (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. Washington, D C: Amer Geophys Union, 487 p.

Nathan S, Schulte F J, 1968. Geology and petrology of the Campbell-Aviator Divide, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, Part 1 Post Paleozoic rocks. New Zeal J Geol Geophys, 11: 940-975.

Riddolls B W, Hancox G T, 1968. The geology of the Upper Mariner Glacier region, North Victoria Land, Antarctica. New Zeal J Geol Geophys, 11: 881-899.

The Pleiades volcano consists of a small trachytic stratovolcano, Mount Pleiones, which along with several lava domes and cinder cones with well-preserved craters, rises 500-m above the broad Evans Neve plateau. The Pleiades are located in the Melbourne volcanic province of Antarctica's northern Victoria Land near the western coast of the Ross Sea. Three nested cones containing distinct craters cap Mount Pleiones. A Potassium-Argon age of 3000 years was obtained from the Taygete cone NNE of Mount Pleiones, and the Pleiades appear to be among the youngest volcanic centers in Antarctica. Other dates of 12-40,000 years support a youthful age despite the large analytical uncertainties.