Bouvet

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 54.42°S
  • 3.35°E

  • 780 m
    2558 ft

  • 386020
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Bouvet.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Bouvet.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1956 Jul 15 ± 545 days ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
0050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Magnetism

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

LeMasurier W E, Thomson J W (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. Washington, D C: Amer Geophys Union, 487 p.

Prestvik T, 1982. The geology, volcanic activity, and age of Bouvetoya, south Atlantic. Proc Internatl Symp Activity Oceanic Volc, Archipelago Univ Azores, 3: 115-123.

Verwoerd W J, Erlank A J, Kable E J D, 1976. Geology and geochemistry of Bouvet Island. In: Gonzalez-Ferran O (ed) {Proc Symp Andean & Antarctic Volcanology Problems (Santiago, Chile, Sept 1974)}, Rome: IAVCEI, p 203-237.

The solitary ice-covered shield volcano of Bouvet Island is located just off the Southwest Indian Ridge, east of the triple junction between the African, South American, and Antarctic plates. The 780-m-high basaltic-to-rhyolitic island, also referred to as Bouvetoya, was discovered by and later named for Captain Lozier-Bouvet during his 1739 search for the "great southern continent." About 95% of the uninhabited 10-km-wide island is covered by glaciers. The most prominent feature is the 3.5-km-wide Wilhelmplataet caldera, which is breached to the sea on the NW side. A late-stage rhyolitic lava dome forms the Cape Valdivia peninsula on the northern flank. The latest dated eruption produced a lava flow at Cape Meteor on the eastern flank about 2000 years ago.