Ascensión

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 7.95°S
  • 14.37°W

  • 858 m
    2814 ft

  • 385050
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Ascensión.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Ascensión.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Ascensión. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Bell J D, Atkins F B, Baker P E, Smith D G W, 1972. Notes on the petrology and age of Ascension Island, south Atlantic (abs). Eos, Trans Amer Geophys Union, 53: 168.

Harris C, 1983. The petrology of lavas and associated plutonic inclusions of Ascension Island. J Petr, 24: 424-470.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Mitchell-Thome R C, 1970. Geology of the South Atlantic islands. Berlin: Gebruder Borntraeger, 350 p.

Ascensión Island, located just west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, was discovered on Ascensión Day, 1501, by the Portuguese navigator Joao da Nova. Ascensión is the broad emergent summit of a massive stratovolcano that rises 3000 m above the sea floor. The isolated island, 1130 km from the nearest land, is dotted with more than 100 youthful parasitic cones and lava domes, many aligned along two fissures. Basaltic rocks dominate on the 858-m-high island, although trachytic lava domes are also present, mostly on the eastern side. Although no eruptive activity has occurred since its discovery during the 16th century, many volcanic features on Ascensión have a very youthful appearance. Two of the youngest lava flows were erupted from flank vents and reached the sea on the northern and southern coasts.