La Palma

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 28.57°N
  • 17.83°W

  • 2426 m
    7957 ft

  • 383010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for La Palma.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for La Palma.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1971 Oct 26 1971 Nov 18 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Teneguia
1949 Jun 24 1949 Jul 30 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations San Juan, Llano del Banco, Hoyo Negro
1712 Oct 9 1712 Dec 3 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations El Charco
1677 Nov 17 1678 Jan 21 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations N & S flanks of San Antonio (Fuentecaliente)
1646 Oct 2 1646 Dec 21 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations South flank of San Martín (Tigalate)
1585 May 19 1585 Aug 10 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Tahuya
1480 ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Tacande (Montaña Quemada)
0900 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Nambroque II-Malforada
0360 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) El Fraile
1320 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) La Fajana (Volcán Fuego)
4050 BCE ± 1000 years Unknown Confirmed   Potassium-Argon L'Amendrita, Birigoyo
4900 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
6050 BCE ± 1000 years Unknown Confirmed   Potassium-Argon

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Afonso A, 1974. Geological sketch and historic volcanoes in La Palma, Canary Islands. Estudios Geol, V Teneguia, p 7-13.

Ancochea E, Hernan F, Cendrero A, Cantagrel J M, Fuster J M, Ibarrola E, Coello J, 1994. Constructive and destructive episodes in the building of a young oceanic island, La Palma, Canary Islands, and genesis of the Caldera de Taburiente. J Volc Geotherm Res, 60: 243-262.

Carracedo J C, 1994. The Canary Islands: an example of structural control on the growth of large oceanic-island volcanoes. J Volc Geotherm Res, 60: 225-241.

Carracedo J C, Badiola E R, Guillou H, de la Nuez J, Perex Torrado F J, 2001. Geology and volcanology of La Plama and El Hierro, western Canaries. Estudios Geol Museo Nac Ciencias Nat, 57: 175-273.

Carracedo J C, Badiola E R, Guillou H, de la Nuez J, Perex Torrado F J, 2001. Geology and volcanology of La Palma and El Hierro, western Canaries. Estudios Geol Museo Nac Ciencias Nat, 57: 175-273.

Carracedo J C, Day S J, Guillou H, Perez-Torrado F J, 1999. Giant Quaternary landslides in the evolution of La Plama and El Hierro, Canary Islands. J Volc Geotherm Res, 94: 169-190.

Day S J, Carracedo J C, Guillou H, Gravestock P, 1999. Recent structural evolution of the Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma, Canary Islands: volcanic rift zone reconfiguration as a precursor to volcano flank instability?. J Volc Geotherm Res, 94: 135-167.

Gee M J R, Masson D G, Watts A B, Mitchell N C, 2001. Offshore continuation of volcanic rift zones, El Hierro, Canary Islands. J Volc Geotherm Res, 105: 107-119.

Guillou H, Carracedo J C, Day S J, 1998. Dating of the Upper Pleistocene-Holocene volcanic activity of La Palma using the unspiked K-Ar technique. J Volc Geotherm Res, 86: 137-149.

Guillou H, Carracedo J C, Duncan R, 2001. K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar ages and magnetostratigraphy of Brunhes and Matuyama lava sequences from La Palma Island. J Volc Geotherm Res, 106: 175-194.

Hernandez-Pacheco A, Valls M C, 1982. The historic eruptions of La Palma Island (Canaries). Proc Internatl Symp Activity Oceanic Volc, Archipelago Univ Azores, 3: 83-94.

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

Klugel A, Schmincke H-U, White J D L, Hoernle K A, 1999. Chronology and volcanology of the 1949 multi-vent rift-zone eruption on La Palma (Canary Islands). J Volc Geotherm Res, 94: 267-282.

Middlemost E A K, 1972. Evolution of La Palma, Canary Archipelago. Contr Mineral Petr, 36: 33-48.

Mitchell N C, Masson D G, Watts A B, Gee M J R, Urgeles R, 2002. The morphology of the submarine flanks of volcanic ocean islands, a comparative study of the Canary and Hawaiian hotspot islands. J Volc Geotherm Res, 115: 83-107.

Mitchell-Thome R C, 1976. Geology of the Middle Atlantic Islands. Berlin: Gebruder Borntraeger, 382 p.

Neumann van Padang M, Richards A F, Machado F, Bravo T, Baker P E, Le Maitre R W, 1967. Atlantic Ocean. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 21: 1-128.

Roa K, 2003. Nature and origin of toreva remnants and volcaniclastics from La Palma, Canary Islands. J Volc Geotherm Res, 125: 191-214.

Romero C, 1991. Las Manifestaciones Volcanicas Historicas del Archipielago Canario. Tenerife: Gobierno de Canarias, 2 vol, 695 & 768 p.

Schmincke H-U, Sumita M, 2010. Geological evolution of the Canary Islands. Koblenz: Gorres-Verlag: 188 p.

White J D L, Schmincke H-U, 1999. Phreatomagmatic eruptive and depositional processes during the 1949 eruption on La Plama (Canary Islands). J Volc Geotherm Res, 94: 283-304.

The 47-km-long wedge-shaped island of La Palma, the NW-most of the Canary Islands, is composed of two large volcanic centers. The older 2426-m-high northern one is cut by the massive steep-walled Caldera Taburiente, one of several massive collapse scarps produced by edifice failure to the SW. The younger 1949-m-high Cumbre Vieja, the southern volcano, is one of the most active in the Canaries. The elongated volcano dates back to about 125,000 years ago and is oriented N-S. Eruptions during the past 7000 years have originated from the abundant cinder cones and craters along the axis of Cumbre Vieja, producing fissure-fed lava flows that descend steeply to the sea. Historical eruptions at La Palma, recorded since the 15th century, have produced mild explosive activity and lava flows that damaged populated areas. The southern tip of the island is mantled by a broad lava field produced during the 1677-1678 eruption. Lava flows also reached the sea in 1585, 1646, 1712, 1949, and 1971.