Graciosa

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  • Portugal
  • Azores
  • Stratovolcano
  • Unknown
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 39.02°N
  • 27.97°W

  • 402 m
    1319 ft

  • 382040
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Graciosa.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Graciosa.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Graciosa. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Mitchell-Thome R C, 1976. Geology of the Middle Atlantic Islands. Berlin: Gebruder Borntraeger, 382 p.

Neumann van Padang M, Richards A F, Machado F, Bravo T, Baker P E, Le Maitre R W, 1967. Atlantic Ocean. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 21: 1-128.

Zbyszewski G, Candido de Medeiros A, Veiga Ferreira O da, Torre de Assuncao C, 1972. Geologic map of Ihla Graciosa (Azores). Servicos Geologicos Portugal, 1:25,000 scale map with 31 p text (in Portuguese).

The SE end of Graciosa, the northernmost of the central Azorean islands, contains a small 0.9 x 1.6 km caldera with active fumaroles. The 402-m-high SE caldera rim is the high point of the small 4 x 8 km island. The caldera has been the source of eruptions producing significant tephra falls, pyroclastic flows, lahars, and lava flows. An important fumarole field is located in a volcanic cave inside the caldera, and a submarine fumarole occurs off the NW coast of Graciosa. Scoria cones erupted along several widely spaced NE-SW-trending fissures fed a youthful lava field that forms the NW end of the island. The most recent eruption from Pico Tomao, NW of the caldera, produced a lava flow that reached the eastern coast NW of the village of Praia.