Ljósufjöll

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 64.87°N
  • 22.23°W

  • 1063 m
    3487 ft

  • 370030
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Ljósufjöll.

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The Ljósufjöll volcanic system at the eastern end of the Snaefellsnes Peninsula is composed of a group of alkali olivine basaltic cinder cones and lava flows along short fissures on a roughly 90-km-long WNW-ESE line. The volcanic field is about 20-km wide at the eastern end and narrows to about 10-km width on the west. The Ljósufjöll volcanic field contains the largest outcrops of silicic rhyolitic and trachytic rocks in the Snaefellsnes volcanic zone, erupted during the mid-to-late Pleistocene. Youthful-looking cinder cones and lava flows with morphologically pristine surfaces as evidence of numerous eruptions during the Holocene. The latest eruption at Ljósufjöll post-dated the settlement of Iceland, and took place about 1000 years ago.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0960 ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Anthropology Raudhalsar
0665 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Ytri and Stóri Raudamelskula
1750 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Grábrók
2050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology Krothraunskula, Raudakúla, Graakula
7050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Eldborg

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.



Cones
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Barnaborg Cone 112 m 64° 46' 0" N 22° 13' 0" W
Botna-Skyrtunna Cone 988 m 64° 55' 0" N 22° 34' 0" W
Eldborg
    Ildborg
Cone 112 m 64° 48' 0" N 22° 20' 0" W
Graakula Cone 211 m 64° 58' 0" N 22° 54' 0" W
Gullborg Cone 143 m 64° 50' 0" N 22° 14' 0" W
Kothraunskula Cone 180 m 64° 58' 0" N 22° 58' 0" W
Raudahalsar Cone 164 m 64° 51' 0" N 22° 14' 0" W
Raudakula Cone 360 m 64° 57' 0" N 22° 53' 0" W
Raudakula-Horgsholtshraun Cone 917 m 64° 55' 0" N 22° 40' 0" W
Raudakula-Svelgarhraun Cone 806 m 64° 56' 0" N 22° 43' 0" W
Raudhalsar Cone 440 m 64° 46' 0" N 22° 0' 0" W
Smahraunakula Cone 140 m 64° 58' 0" N 22° 55' 0" W
Syrdri Raudamelskula Cone 154 m 64° 52' 0" N 22° 18' 0" W
Yrtri Raudamelskula Cone 222 m 64° 53' 0" N 22° 21' 0" W


Craters
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Skyrtunna Crater 64° 55' 0" N 22° 30' 0" W
This vertical aerial photo, with south to the top, shows the symmetrical Graakula cinder cone at the lower left, which erupted about 4000 years ago and produced a lava flow that entered Selvallavatn lake. The flow is part of the Ljósufjöll volcanic system, which is composed of a group of cinder cones and lava flows along short fissures on a roughly 90-km-long WNW-ESE line. The latest eruption at Ljósufjöll post-dated the settlement of Iceland, and took place about 1000 years ago.

Photo by Landmælingar Islands, courtesy of Jack Green (published in Green and Short, 1971).
The Ljósufjöll volcanic system at the eastern end of the Snæfellsnes Peninsula is composed of a group of cinder cones and lava flows erupted along short fissures on a roughly 90-km-long WNW-ESE line. The crest of the Ljósufjöll range is seen here from the south with glacial moraines descending its flanks. The latest eruption at Ljósufjöll post-dated the settlement of Iceland, and took place about 1000 years ago.

Photo by Oddur Sigurdsson, 1983 (Icelandic National Energy Authority).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Flude S, Burgess R, McGarvie D W, 2008. Silicic volcanism at Ljosufjoll, Iceland: insights into evolution and eruptive history from Ar-Ar dating. J Volc Geotherm Res, 169: 154-175.

Gudmundsson A T, 1986b. Iceland-Fires. Reykjavik: Vaka-Helgafell, 168 p.

Jakobsson S P, 1972. Chemistry and distribution pattern of recent basaltic rocks in Iceland. Lithos, 5: 365-386.

Johannesson H, 1977. There is not the farm, where now is the Eldborg crater. Natturufraedingurinn, 47: 129-141 (in Icelandic with English summary).

Johannesson H, 1982. Summary of the geology of Snaefellsnes. Arbok Ferdafelags Islands 1982, p 151-172 (in Icelandic).

Johannesson H, Saemundsson K, 1998. Geological map of Iceland, 1:500,000. Tectonics. Icelandic Inst Nat Hist, Reykjavik.

Kjartansson G, 1968. Geological map of Iceland, sheet 2, west-central Iceland. Icelandic Museum Nat Hist, 1:250,000 geol map.

Steinthorsson S, et al., 2002. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World - Iceland. Unpublished manuscript.

Thorarinsson S, 1968. Roadlog: Scandinavian geological excursion. Unpublished Field Trip Guide.

Thordarson T, Hoskuldsson A, 2008. Postglacial eruptions in Iceland. Jokull, 58: 197-228.

Volcano Types

Fissure vent(s)
Cinder cone(s)

Tectonic Setting

Rift zone
Oceanic crust (< 15 km)

Rock Types

Major
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Rhyolite
Trachyte / Trachyandesite
Trachyandesite / Basaltic trachy-andesite
Trachybasalt / Tephrite Basanite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
713
713
1,511
192,797

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Ljósufjöll Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.