Morne Diablotins

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  • Dominica
  • West Indies
  • Stratovolcano
  • Unknown - Uncertain Evidence
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 15.503°N
  • 61.397°W

  • 1430 m
    4690 ft

  • 360090
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Morne Diablotins.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Morne Diablotins.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Morne Diablotins.

Morne Diablotins, a relatively unknown volcano in northern Dominica, is the largest and highest on Dominica and the second highest peak of the Lesser Antilles. A complex of at least five coalescing lava domes forms the broad summit of roughly 1430-m-high Morne Diablotins, and other domes are found to the SE. Pyroclastic-flow deposits emplaced about 22,000-40,000 years ago, known as the Grand Savanne Ignimbrite, extend in five radial tongues around the volcano as far as the coast. Precolumbian block-and-ash flow aprons on the NW flank are relatively unmodified by erosion. No historical eruptions are known from Morne Diablotins, although numerous hot springs, both onshore and submarine, are found near Glanvillia, on the NW flank. Severe earthquake swarms in 1841 and 1893 originated either from Morne Diablotins or Morne aux Diables to the north.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Morne Diablotins. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Morne Diablotins page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.



Domes
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Espagnol, Morne Dome 365 m 15° 31' 30" N 61° 29' 0" W
Mosquito Mountain Dome 1080 m 15° 29' 0" N 61° 24' 0" W
Resources, Morne les Dome 1156 m 15° 30' 0" N 61° 25' 0" W


Thermal
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Glanvillia Hot Springs Hot Spring 15° 33' 0" N 61° 29' 0" W
Cloud-draped Morne Diablotins (center) is the largest volcano on Dominica and one of the largest of the Lesser Antilles. It is seen here from the south beyond Morne Trois Piton volcano at the far right. Two coalescing lava domes form the summit of 1430-m-high Morne Diablotins, and precolumbian pyroclastic-flow aprons on the NW flank are relatively unmodified by erosion. Historical eruptions are not known from Morne Diablotins. However the volcano has a youthful appearance, and seismic swarms have occurred nearby in recent years.

Photo by Paul Jackson, 1998 (Seismic Research Unit, University of West Indies).
Cloud-draped Morne Diablotins volcano rises above the leeward coast of Dominica. This little known volcano is the largest on Dominica and one of the largest of the Lesser Antilles. Two coalescing lava domes form the summit of 1430-m-high Morne Diablotins, and precolumbian pyroclastic-flow aprons on the NW flank are relatively unmodified by erosion. The sharp-topped peak in the right foreground is the Morne Espagnol (Barbers Rock) lava dome. No historical eruptions are known from Morne Diablotins.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2002 (Smithsonian Institution).
Morne Espagnol, also known as Barbers Block, is a steep-sided Pliocene lava dome that rises to 365 m above the coast on the NW flank of Morne Diablotins volcano, whose summit is hidden in the clouds. The massive volcano, the largest on Dominica, is capped by a complex of at least five lava domes. Block-and-ash flow deposits radiate away from the summit and reach the coast.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2002 (Smithsonian Institution).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Bellon H, 1988. Reconnaissance chronologique des deux premieres phases d'activite volcanique en Dominique (Petites Antilles). Compte Rendus Acad Sci Paris, 306: 1487-1492.

Lindsay J M, Smith A L, Roobol M J, Stasiuk M V, 2005b. Dominica. In: Lindsay J M, Robertson R E A, Shepherd J B, Ali S (eds). {Volcanic Hazard Atlas of the Lesser Antilles}, Trinidad and Tobago, Seismic Res Unit, Univ West Indies, p 1-47.

Robson G R, Tomblin J, 1966. West Indies. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 20: 1-56.

Shepherd J B, 1989. Eruptions, eruption precursors and related phenomena in the Lesser Antilles. In: Latter J H (ed), {Volcanic Hazards - Assessment and Monitoring}, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, p 292-311.

Shepherd J B, 2001. Volcanoes of the eastern Caribbean: past activity and future hazards. Paper presented at the Workshop on Volcanic and Seismic Hazards in the eastern Caribbean, May 28- June 1, 2001, 57 p.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Lava dome(s)

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Oceanic crust (< 15 km)

Rock Types

Major
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite
Dacite
Basalt / Picro-Basalt

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
423
9,775
69,935
513,702

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Morne Diablotins Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.