Lanín

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 39.637°S
  • 71.502°W

  • 3776 m
    12385 ft

  • 357122
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Lanín.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Lanín.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Lanín.

Lanín is a large conical late-Pleistocene to Holocene stratovolcano along the Chile-Argentina border. The dominantly effusive basaltic-to-trachydacitic volcano lies at the eastern end of a NW-SE-trending volcanic group beginning with Villarrica that is transverse to the Andean chain. The beautifully symmetrical, 3776-m-high Lanín rises 2500 m above its base; shoulder areas on the upper flanks hint at a buried caldera. The volcano was formed in four eruptive stages dating back to the early Pleistocene or late Pliocene. The last two stages occurred during the late-Pleistocene and Holocene. A small lava dome at the summit fed blocky lava flows to the north about 2200 years ago. Lanín was reported active after an earthquake in 1906, but Sapper (1917) stated that newspaper accounts are strongly disputed, and no historical eruptions are known. A postglacial tuff ring (Volcán Arenal) is located below the SW flank in Argentina. A younger lava flow from Lanín covers deposits of Volcán Arenal and extends south into Lago Paimún.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0560 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected)
0400 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected)
0090 ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Tephrochronology Quillelhue Basalts
0080 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected)
0220 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) Mamuil Malal dome
0590 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected)
6340 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected)
9240 BCE ± 500 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.



Cones
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Arenal, Volcán Tuff ring 1560 m 39° 40' 0" S 71° 35' 17" W
Paimún Cones Cinder cone


Craters
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Huinfiuca Fissure vent


Domes
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Mamuil Malal Dome
Volcán Lanín is a large conical late-Pleistocene to Holocene stratovolcano along the Chile-Argentina border. The beautifully symmetrical, 3737-m-high Lanín, seen here from the Chilean side, rises 2500 m above its base. A small lava dome at the summit fed blocky lava flows to the north. A postglacial tuff ring (Volcán Arenal) is located below the SW flank of Lanín in Argentina. A younger lava flow from Lanín covers deposits of Volcán Arenal and extends south into Lago Paimún. No reliable reports of historical eruptions from Lanín are known.

Photo by John Davidson, University of Michigan (courtesy of Hugo Moreno (University of Chile).
Quetrupillan stratovolcano (left) lies at the center of a group of three volcanoes trending transverse to the Andean chain. It is seen here from the summit of Villarrica volcano (at the western end of the chain), with conical Lanín volcano at the eastern end in the background. The 2360-m-high Quetrupillan volcano was constructed within a large 7 x 10 km wide caldera; a smaller caldera truncates the summit. Some of the most recent activity produced pyroclastic cones along the right-hand flank, near the SW margin of the older caldera.

Photo by Judy Harden, 2004 (University of South Florida).
The lava flow in the foreground roadcut is part of the Quillelhue Basalts, which were erupted from an area at about 2600 m altitude on the NNW flank of Lanín, the snow-capped volcano in the background. The lavas form a basaltic field that reaches as far as Quillelhue Lake, more than 5 km from their source. The flows are bracketed by 2170 BP date for the Mamuil Malal dacitic block-and-ash flow and a 1650 BP date for an overlying pyroclastic-flow deposit.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2004 (Smithsonian Institution).
Snow-capped Lanín volcano rises to the SSW above the Chile/Argentina border. A grove of distinctive Araucaria trees ("monkey puzzle trees") occupy the foreground. These distinctive trees are one of Chile's most renowned conifers and are confined to restricted areas in the Andes. Fossils reveal that this genus was once extremely widespread, leaving behind petrified woods in Arizona and amber deposits around the globe. The Auracaria occurs today only in Chile, one small region in Brazil, a few places in Australia, and New Caledonia.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2004 (Smithsonian Institution).
Lanín volcano rises to the south above a grove of distinctive Araucaria trees near the Chile/Argentina border. The beautifully symmetrical, 3737-m-high Lanín towers 2500 m above its base. The prominent shoulder area on the upper western (right horizon) and northern flanks hint at a buried caldera. The volcano was formed by dominantly effusive basaltic-to-trachydacitic eruptions at the eastern end of a NW-SE-trending volcanic group beginning with Villarrica on the west that is transverse to the Andean chain.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2004 (Smithsonian Institution).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Corbella H, Susana Alonso M, 1987. Post-glacial hydroclastic and pyroclastic deposits in the Lanin National Park, north Patagonian cordillera, Nequen, Argentina. Andean Volc Internatl Symp, Tucaman, Argentina, 9 p.

Gonzalez-Ferran O, 1995. Volcanes de Chile. Santiago: Instituto Geografico Militar, 635 p.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Lara L E, Naranjo J E, Moreno H, 2004. Lanin volcano (39.5° S), Southern Andes: geology and morphostructural evolution. Rev Geol Chile, 31: 241-257.

Moreno H, 1974. Airplane flight over active volcanoes of central-south Chile. Internatl Symp Volc Andean & Antarctic Volc Problems Guidebook, Excur D-3, 56 p.

Moreno H, Naranjo J A, 1991. The southern Andes volcanoes (33°-41° 30' S), Chile. 6th Geol Cong Chile, Excur PC-3, 26 p.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Caldera
Pyroclastic cone(s)
Tuff ring

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Trachyandesite / Basaltic trachy-andesite
Trachyte / Trachyandesite
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Minor
Trachybasalt / Tephrite Basanite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
13
352
3,007
202,987

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Lanín Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.