Callaqui

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 37.92°S
  • 71.45°W

  • 3164 m
    10378 ft

  • 357091
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

28 December-3 January 2012

Based on a pilot observation, the Buenos Aires VAAC reported that the top of an ash plume from Callaqui was at 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. on 2 January. Ash was not detected in satellite imagery under clear skies.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)



 Available Weekly Reports


2011: December
2009: January
2008: February


28 December-3 January 2012

Based on a pilot observation, the Buenos Aires VAAC reported that the top of an ash plume from Callaqui was at 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. on 2 January. Ash was not detected in satellite imagery under clear skies.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 January-27 January 2009

Based on a pilot observation and analysis of satellite imagery, the Buenos Aires VAAC reported that an ash plume from Callaqui drifted NE on 22 January. The VAAC also reported that an ash plume from Nevados de Chillán, a nearby volcano 120 km N, drifted SE on 21 and 22 January.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 February-19 February 2008

According to news articles on 14 February, scientists from the Universidad de Concepción will install instruments to monitor Callaqui. Local residents reported feeling earthquakes and hearing constant rumbling noises during the previous few weeks.

Source: El Mostrador


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 2012 Jan 2 ] [ 2012 Jan 2 ] Uncertain    
[ 2009 Jan 22 ] [ 2009 Jan 22 ] Uncertain    
1980 Oct 1980 Oct Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
[ 1937 Sep 18 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1872 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1864 Oct ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1751 Dec 31 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Gonzalez-Ferran O, 1972. Distribucion del volcanismo activo de Chile y la reciente erupcion del Volcan Villarrica. Instituto Geog Militar Chile, O/T 3491.

Gonzalez-Ferran O, 1995. Volcanes de Chile. Santiago: Instituto Geografico Militar, 635 p.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Moreno H, 1974. Airplane flight over active volcanoes of central-south Chile. Internatl Symp Volc Andean & Antarctic Volc Problems Guidebook, Excur D-3, 56 p.

Moreno H, 1992. Estudio preliminar del riesgo volcanico del area de Ralco. Proyecto Ralco, INGENDESA, Chile, unpublished rpt.

Moreno H, 1985. . (pers. comm.).

Moreno H, Naranjo J A, 1991. The southern Andes volcanoes (33°-41° 30' S), Chile. 6th Geol Cong Chile, Excur PC-3, 26 p.

Stone J B, Ingerson E, 1934. Some volcanoes of Southern Chile. Amer J Sci, 28: 269-287.

The late-Pleistocene to Holocene Callaqui stratovolcano has a profile of an overturned canoe due to its construction along an 11-km-long, SW-NE fissure above a 1.2-0.3 million year old Pleistocene edifice. The ice-capped, 3164-m-high basaltic-andesite Callaqui volcano contains well-preserved volcanic cones and lava flows, which have traveled up to 14 km. Small craters 100-500 m in diameter are primarily found along a fissure extending down the SW flank. Intense solfataric activity occurs at the southern part of the summit; in 1966 and 1978, red glow was observed in fumarolic areas (Moreno 1985, pers. comm.). Periods of intense fumarolic activity have dominated at Callaqui, and few historical eruptions are known. An explosive eruption was reported in 1751, there were uncertain accounts of eruptions in 1864 and 1937, and a small phreatic ash emission was noted in 1980.