Antuco

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 37.406°S
  • 71.349°W

  • 2979 m
    9771 ft

  • 357080
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

24 April-30 April 2013

The Buenos Aires VAAC reported that only gas and steam rose from Antuco on 20 April; although a pilot reported ash emissions, ash was not identified in satellite imagery or by web camera during clear skies.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)



 Available Weekly Reports


2013: April


24 April-30 April 2013

The Buenos Aires VAAC reported that only gas and steam rose from Antuco on 20 April; although a pilot reported ash emissions, ash was not identified in satellite imagery or by web camera during clear skies.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1972 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1929 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
1869 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1863 Dec Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1862 Jan ] [ 1862 Mar 3 ] Uncertain    
1861 Feb (?) 1861 Aug (?) Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
1852 Nov 1853 Jan Confirmed 3 Historical Observations NE flank fissure and summit
[ 1848 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1845 Feb 26 1845 Mar 1 (in or after) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1839 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1828 Dec 18 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1820 1821 (?) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1806 May (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1752 Jan 31 1752 Feb 1 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1750 ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
7750 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Casertano L, 1963a. Chilean Continent. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 15: 1-55.

Hildreth W, Moorbath S, 1988. Crustal contribution to arc magmatism in the Andes of central Chile. Contr Mineral Petr, 98: 455-489.

Lopez-Escobar L, Vergara M, Frey F A, 1981. Petrology and geochemistry of lavas from Antuco volcano, a basaltic volcano of the southern Andes (37° 25' S). J Volc Geotherm Res, 11: 329-352.

Moreno H, 1974. Airplane flight over active volcanoes of central-south Chile. Internatl Symp Volc Andean & Antarctic Volc Problems Guidebook, Excur D-3, 56 p.

Moreno H, Naranjo J A, 1991. The southern Andes volcanoes (33°-41° 30' S), Chile. 6th Geol Cong Chile, Excur PC-3, 26 p.

Antuco volcano, constructed to the NE of the Pleistocene Sierra Velluda stratovolcano, rises dramatically above the SW shore of Laguna de la Laja. Antuco has a complicated history beginning with construction of the basaltic-to-andesitic Sierra Veluda and Cerro Condor stratovolcanoes of Pliocene-Pleistocene age. Construction of the Antuco I volcano was followed by edifice failure at the beginning of the Holocene that produced a large debris avalanche which traveled down the Río Laja to the west and left a large 5-km-wide horseshoe-shaped caldera breached to the west. The steep-sided modern basaltic-to-andesitic cone of has grown 1000 m since then; flank fissures and cones have also been active. Moderate explosive eruptions were recorded in the 18th and 19th centuries from both summit and flank vents, and historical lava flows have traveled into the Río Laja drainage.