Láscar

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 23.37°S
  • 67.73°W

  • 5592 m
    18342 ft

  • 355100
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

3 April-9 April 2013

OVDAS-SERNAGEOMIN reported that during March a web camera monitoring Láscar recorded white gas plumes rising 600 m above the crater. At night during 2-4 April incandescence from the crater was observed. On 3 April increased emissions from the crater fluctuated from white to gray, indicating possible ash. Plumes rose 320 m and drifted SE. Seismicity remained at normal levels during the increased emissions. On 5 April the Alert Level was raised to Yellow.

Source: Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (SERNAGEOMIN)



 Available Weekly Reports


2013: April
2012: January
2007: January | March | May | July
2006: April | August
2005: May
2003: December


3 April-9 April 2013

OVDAS-SERNAGEOMIN reported that during March a web camera monitoring Láscar recorded white gas plumes rising 600 m above the crater. At night during 2-4 April incandescence from the crater was observed. On 3 April increased emissions from the crater fluctuated from white to gray, indicating possible ash. Plumes rose 320 m and drifted SE. Seismicity remained at normal levels during the increased emissions. On 5 April the Alert Level was raised to Yellow.

Source: Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (SERNAGEOMIN)


4 January-10 January 2012

OVDAS-SERNAGEOMIN reported increased seismicity at Láscar on 5 January and raised the Alert Level from Green to Yellow. On 8 January ONEMI authorities warned residents about the new Alert Level status and restricted residents from going within a 20-km radius of the volcano.

Sources: Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (SERNAGEOMIN), Oficina Nacional de Emergencia-Ministerio del Interior (ONEMI)


18 July-24 July 2007

Based on pilot reports and satellite image observations, the Buenos Aires VAAC reported that an ash plume from Lascar rose to altitudes of 7.6-9.1 km (25,000-30,000 ft) a.s.l. on 18 July and drifted NE.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 May-29 May 2007

Based on a Significant Meteorological Information (SIGMET) advisory and satellite image observations, the Buenos Aires VAAC reported that an ash plume from Lascar rose to an altitude of 9.1 km (30,000 ft) a.s.l. on 23 May and drifted SSE.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 March-13 March 2007

The Buenos Aires VAAC reported that on 11 March an ash cloud from Lascar rose to 5.5-6.7 km (18,000-22,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 January-23 January 2007

Based on satellite imagery, the Buenos Aires VAAC reported continuous emissions from Lascar on 22 January. Ash plumes drifted NNE.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 August-29 August 2006

Several small phreatic explosions occurred at Lascar during May, July, and August. The explosions were separated in time by up to several weeks. The last observed explosion, lasting for about five minutes on 14 August, produced a plume that reached a height of 450 m above the crater (19,800 ft a.s.l.) and dispersed ESE.

Source: Jorge Clavero-Chilean Geological Survey (Sernageomin) and Juan Cayupi-Chilean Emergency Office (ONEMI) via the Volcano Listserv


26 April-2 May 2006

Based on information from a significant meteorological forecast (SIGMET), the Buenos Aires VAAC reported that on 28 April a W-drifting ash cloud was observed at a height around 6.1-7.6 km (20,000-25,000 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code was at Red. Later that day activity was no longer observed and the Aviation Color Code was reduced to Green.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


19 April-25 April 2006

Several phreatic explosions occurred at Lascar daily during 18-21 April. The explosions produced plumes of gas and small amounts of ash, with the highest rising plumes reaching 3 km above the volcano (or 28,200 ft a.s.l.) on the 18th and the 21st. Ash was deposited on the volcano's flanks as far as 3 km from the summit. There was no evidence of new magma reaching the surface and recorded seismicity was inferred to be related to shallow degassing. The Buenos Aires VAAC released volcanic ash advisory statements during the report period.

Sources: Jorge Clavero-Chilean Geological Survey (Sernageomin) and Juan Cayupi-Chilean Emergency Office (ONEMI) via the Volcano Listserv, Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


12 April-18 April 2006

ONEMI reported that two explosive eruptions occurred at Lascar on 18 April. The first ash emission began at 1120 and the second began at 1315. According to the Buenos Aires VAAC, a significant meteorological forecast (SIGMET) was issued for Lascar on 18 April stating that a "smoke" column was at a height of 8 km (26,250 ft) a.s.l. and was drifting eastward towards Argentina. The Aviation Color Code was at Red, the highest level. Activity ended later that day, so the Aviation Color Code was reduced to Green. The Villarrica Volcano Visual Observation Project (POVI) website reported that a cloud rose to 3 km above the volcano (28,200 ft a.s.l.), no seismic activity was recorded in the area, and no evacuations occurred.

Sources: Oficina Nacional de Emergencia-Ministerio del Interior (ONEMI), Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Villarrica Volcano Visual Surveillance Project


4 May-10 May 2005

The Buenos Aires VAAC reported an eruption from Lascar seen on satellite imagery early on 4 May that sent an ash plume into the 4.5-10.6 km a.s.l. range (15,000-35,000 feet), where it was moving to the SE.

Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


31 December-6 January 2004

According the Oficina Nacional de Emergencia Ministerio del Interior (ONEMI), on 9 December small amounts of fine ash were emitted from fumaroles at Lascar. The following day activity was at "normal" levels, with only gas and steam emitted. No increased seismicity was recorded.

Source: Oficina Nacional de Emergencia-Ministerio del Interior (ONEMI)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2013 Apr 2 2013 Apr 4 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2006 Apr 18 2007 Jul 18 (?) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
2005 May 4 2005 May 4 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
[ 2003 Dec 9 ] [ 2003 Dec 9 ] Uncertain 1  
2002 Oct 26 2002 Oct 27 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 2001 May 17 (?) ] [ 2001 Jul 5 (?) ] Uncertain    
2000 Jul 20 2001 Jan 18 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1996 Oct 18 1996 Oct 18 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1994 Nov 13 1995 Jul 20 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1994 Jul 20 1994 Jul 26 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1993 Dec 17 1994 Feb 27 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1993 Jan 30 1993 Aug Confirmed 4 Historical Observations Western crater of east summit cone
1991 Oct 21 1992 May 23 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1990 Nov 24 1990 Nov 24 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1987 Nov (in or before) 1990 Apr 6 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Western crater of east summit cone
1986 Sep 14 1986 Sep 16 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Western crater of east summit cone
1984 Dec 1985 Jul Confirmed 0 Historical Observations Western crater of east summit cone
[ 1974 Jul ] [ 1974 Sep ] Uncertain 1  
[ 1972 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1969 May 16 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
1959 Nov 1968 Jan 31 (in or after) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1954 Jun 1954 Jul Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1951 Nov 1952 Feb 19 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations East summit crater
1940 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1933 Oct 9 1933 Dec Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1902 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1898 1900 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1883 1885 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1875 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1858 Apr 1858 Dec Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1854 Jan 20 1854 Jan 30 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Lascar or Aguas Calientes
[ 1853 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1848 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Lascar or Agua Calientes
5150 BCE ± 1000 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Surface Exposure Eastern crater, Tumbres-Talabre lava flow
7250 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Lascar II (Tumbres scoria flow)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Calder E S, Sparks R S J, Gardeweg M C, 2000. Erosion, transport and segregation of pumice and lithic clasts in pyroclastic flows inferred from ignimbrite at Lascar volcano, Chile. J Volc Geotherm Res, 104: 201-235.

Casertano L, 1963a. Chilean Continent. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 15: 1-55.

de Silva S L, Francis P W, 1991. Volcanoes of the Central Andes. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 216 p.

Gardeweg M C, Sparks R S J, Matthews S J, 1998. Evolution of Lascar volcano, northern Chile. J Geol Soc London, 155: 89-104.

Gardeweg M, Lindsay J, 2004. Lascar volcano and La Pacana caldera. IAVCEI Gen Assembly 2004 Pucon, Chile Field Trip Guide A2, 32 p.

Glaze L S, Francis P W, Self S, Rothery D A, 1989. The 16 September 1986 eruption of Lascar volcano, north Chile: satellite investigations. Bull Volc, 51: 149-160.

Gonzalez-Ferran O, 1995. Volcanes de Chile. Santiago: Instituto Geografico Militar, 635 p.

Matthews S J, Gardeweg M C, Sparks R S J, 1997. The 1984 to 1996 cyclic activity of Lascar volcano, northern Chile: cycles of dome growth, dome subsidence, degasssing and explosive eruptions. Bull Volc, 59: 72-82.

Matthews S J, Jones A P, Gardeweg M C, 1994. Lascar volcano, northern Chile; evidence for steady-state disequilibrium. J Petr, 35: 401-432.

Oppenheimer C, Francis P W, Rothery D A, Carlton R W T, 1993. Infrared image analysis of volcanic thermal features: Lascar volcano, Chile, 1984-1992. J Geophys Res, 98: 4269-4286.

Petit-Breuilh M E, 1994. Tabla resumen de la actividad eruptiva del Volcan Lascar. Serv Nac Geol Min Chile, unpublished rpt.

Sparks R S J, Gardeweg M C, Calder E S, Matthews S J, 1997. Erosion by pyroclastic flows of Lascar volcano, Chile. Bull Volc, 58: 557-565.

Wooster M J, Rothery D A, 1997. Thermal monitoring of Lascar volcano, Chile, using infrared data from the along-track scanning radiometer: a 1992-1995 time series. Bull Volc, 58: 566-579.

Láscar is the most active volcano of the northern Chilean Andes. The andesitic-to-dacitic stratovolcano contains six overlapping summit craters. Prominent lava flows descend its NW flanks. An older, higher stratovolcano 5 km to the east, Volcán Aguas Calientes, displays a well-developed summit crater and a probable Holocene lava flow near its summit (de Silva and Francis, 1991). Láscar consists of two major edifices; activity began at the eastern volcano and then shifted to the western cone. The largest eruption of Lascar took place about 26,500 years ago, and following the eruption of the Tumbres scoria flow about 9000 years ago, activity shifted back to the eastern edifice, where three overlapping craters were formed. Frequent small-to-moderate explosive eruptions have been recorded from Láscar in historical time since the mid-19th century, along with periodic larger eruptions that produced ashfall hundreds of kilometers away from the volcano. The largest historical eruption of Láscar took place in 1993, producing pyroclastic flows to 8.5 km NW of the summit and ashfall in Buenos Aires.