Darwin

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 0.18°S
  • 91.28°W

  • 1330 m
    4362 ft

  • 353030
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Darwin.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Darwin.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1813 Jun 6 1813 Jun 7 (?) Confirmed 2 Unknown
1150 ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Surface Exposure
0210 ± 500 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Surface Exposure

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Geist D, Harpp K, Reynolds B, 2006. A field trip guide to the geology of the Galapagos Islands. Cities on Volcanoes 4, Quito, Ecuador, 23-27 Jan, 2006, Field Trip Guide, 30 p.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

McBirney A R, Williams H, 1969. Geology and petrology of the Galapagos Islands. Geol Soc Amer Mem, 118: 1-197.

Naumann T, Geist D, 2000. Physical volcanology and structural development of Cerro Azul volcano, Isabela Island, Galapagos: implications for the development of Galapagos-type shield volcanoes.. Bull Volc, 61: 497-514.

Richards A F, 1962. Archipelago de Colon, Isla San Felix and Islas Juan Fernandez. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 14: 1-50.

Volcán Darwin, named after the renowned naturalist, contains a symmetrical 5-km-wide, 200-m-deep summit caldera whose floor is nearly covered by youthful lava flows. A broad terrace occupies the SW part of the caldera. Fresh-looking, unvegetated lava flows descend all flanks of the volcano and reach both the eastern and western coasts. The most recent summit activity produced several small lava flows from vents on the east caldera floor and NE and SE caldera rims. Radial fissures descend the volcano's flanks, and one reaches beyond its base to the the SW coast and cuts Tagus tuff cone. The sheltered anchorage of Tagus Cove breaches the southern side of the cone and was visited by Darwin and other noted visitors. This prominent tuff cone and its neighbor Beagle (also breached to the south) are located on the SW-flank coastline and were a prominent part of Darwin's geological studies in the Galápagos Islands.