Sangay

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Ecuador
  • Ecuador
  • Stratovolcano
  • 2013 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 2.002°S
  • 78.341°W

  • 5230 m
    17154 ft

  • 352090
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

22 May-28 May 2013

Based on a pilot report, the Washington VAAC reported that on 23 May an ash plume from Sangay drifted W at an altitude of 7.6 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. Weather clouds prevented satellite image views of the plume.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)



 Available Weekly Reports


2013: January | February | April | May
2012: January | March | May | June | July
2011: January | February | October | November
2010: January | February | April | May | July | August | September | October | December
2009: February | March | June | July | September | October | November | December
2008: September | December
2007: January | February | March | May | July | August | September | October | December
2006: October | November | December
2005: October
2004: January | April | December


22 May-28 May 2013

Based on a pilot report, the Washington VAAC reported that on 23 May an ash plume from Sangay drifted W at an altitude of 7.6 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. Weather clouds prevented satellite image views of the plume.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 April-30 April 2013

Based on analyses of satellite imagery and a SIGMET aviation notice, the Washington VAAC reported that on 26 April two brief ash emissions from Sangay drifted SW and dissipated within 20 km. A thermal anomaly was visible in infrared satellite images.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 April-16 April 2013

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 11 April an ash plume from Sangay drifted W.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 February-26 February 2013

According to the Washington VAAC, on 22 February a pilot observed an ash plume from Sangay that rose to an altitude of 7.6 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW. Due to cloud cover in the area, neither satellite image analysis nor the Instituto Geofísico-Escuela Politécnica Nacional (IG) could confirm an ash emission. Ash plumes were not detected in cloudy satellite image views during 23-24 February, but a thermal anomaly was detected on 24 February.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 January-29 January 2013

Based on a pilot report, analyses of satellite images, and information from the Guayaquil MWO, the Washington VAAC reported that a possible eruption from Sangay before 1210 on 25 January may have produced ash plumes. Cloud cover prevented satellite observations of emissions during 25-26 January, although a weak thermal anomaly was detected.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 July-31 July 2012

According to the Washington VAAC, a pilot reported that on 29 July an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. A plume that may have been mostly gas was detected in satellite images pushing through the metrological cloud deck and drifting W.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 July-24 July 2012

According to the Washington VAAC, a pilot reported that a possible eruption from Sangay occurred prior to 1438 on 20 July. Ash was not observed in satellite imagery and a SIGMET issued for the event was later cancelled.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 July-10 July 2012

According to the Washington VAAC, a thermal anomaly on Sangay was detected in satellite imagery during 4-6 July.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 June-12 June 2012

According to the Washington VAAC, a pilot observed an ash plume from Sangay on 6 June that rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N. Meteorological clouds prevented satellite image views. A pilot observed ash drifting E on 10 June.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


30 May-5 June 2012

According to the Washington VAAC, a pilot observed an ash plume from Sangay on 4 June that rose to an altitude of 7.9 km (26,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. Ash was not detected in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 May-29 May 2012

Based on a SIGMET report, the Washington VAAC reported a possible eruption and ash plume from Sangay on 28 May. A later notice stated that a pilot reported an ash plume at an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. Ash was not identified in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 March-27 March 2012

According to the Washington VAAC, a pilot observed an ash plume from Sangay on 22 March that rose to an altitude of 8.2 km (27,000 ft) a.s.l. Cloud cover prevented satellite observations.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 January-24 January 2012

Based on information from pilots and the Guayaquil MWO, an ash plume from Sangay was reported drifting S and SE on 23 January. Ash was not detected in partly-cloudy satellite imagery. On 24 January a hotspot was visible on satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 January-10 January 2012

Based on information from Guayaquil MWO and a pilot report, a possible ash plume from Sangay was reported on 8 January. Ash was not detected in partly-cloudy satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


16 November-22 November 2011

The Washington VAAC reported that on 20 November an ash plume from a possible eruption at Sangay was observed by a pilot and drifted at an altitude of 5.9 km (19,500 ft) a.s.l. Ash was not detected in partly-cloudy satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


19 October-25 October 2011

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 25 October a gas plume from Sangay, which possibly contained ash, drifted 75 km E. Ash was not identified in subsequent images.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


5 October-11 October 2011

Based on information from the Guayaquil MWO and a pilot observation, the Washington VAAC reported that on 11 October an ash plume from Sangay from a possible eruption rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. Ash was not observed in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 February-1 March 2011

The Washington VAAC reported that on 23 February a pilot observed ash from Sangay. No ash was confirmed in a small cloud identified in satellite imagery drifting SSE.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


26 January-1 February 2011

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 27 January small ash clouds from Sangay drifted N and quickly dissipated.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


19 January-25 January 2011

Based on a pilot observation, the Washington VAAC reported that on 20 January an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7.6 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. Ash was not detected in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


12 January-18 January 2011

Based on a pilot observation, the Washington VAAC reported that on 12 January an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. and possibly drifted more than 45 km SW. A thermal anomaly was detected in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


1 December-7 December 2010

Based on information from Guayaquil MWO, the Washington VAAC reported ash from Sangay on 5 December; weather clouds prevented satellite observations. IG noted elevated seismicity.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


27 October-2 November 2010

The Washington VAAC reported that on 29 October a thermal anomaly from Sangay was seen in satellite imagery. A narrow steam-and-gas plume possibly containing some ash was also detected.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 October-19 October 2010

The Washington VAAC reported that on 14 October a pilot noted an ash plume from Sangay; however, an analysis of satellite imagery revealed only gas plumes drifting NW.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 October-12 October 2010

The Washington VAAC reported that on 6 October small ash clouds from Sangay were observed by a pilot. The ash clouds were seen in satellite imagery drifting WNW.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


15 September-21 September 2010

The Washington VAAC reported that on 21 September an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7.6 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. and was observed by a pilot. Ash was not seen in satellite imagery, although weather clouds were in the area.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


8 September-14 September 2010

The Washington VAAC reported that on 10 September a small plume and a thermal anomaly from Sangay were seen in satellite imagery. Based on information from Tegucigalpa MWO, pilot observations, and analyses of satellite imagery, the VAAC reported that on 13 September small plumes of gas with possible ash drifted SW. A thermal anomaly had also been detected for the previous few hours.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


1 September-7 September 2010

The Washington VAAC reported that on 5 September an ash plume from Sangay that rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. was observed by a pilot. Ash was not seen in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 August-31 August 2010

The Washington VAAC reported that on 30 August an ash plume was observed near Sangay by a pilot. Ash was not seen in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 August-24 August 2010

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 19 August small ash-and-gas plumes from Sangay drifted about 25 km W and dissipated. Intermittent thermal anomalies were also detected. On 20 August a pilot reported an emission that was not seen in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 July-27 July 2010

Based on pilot observations and analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 21 July an ash cloud from Sangay drifted W. During 22-23 July, diffuse plumes drifted 65-115 km W. Occasional thermal anomalies were detected by satellite imagery on 21 and 23 July.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


5 May-11 May 2010

The Washington VAAC reported that on 6 May an ash plume from Sangay was seen by a pilot. Ash was not identified in satellite imagery, but a diffuse steam-and-gas plume was seen before weather clouds moved into the area.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 April-27 April 2010

Based on a pilot observation, the Washington VAAC reported that on 21 April an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. Ash was not identified in satellite imagery, although weather clouds were present in the area.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 February-23 February 2010

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that on 22 February an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7.6 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. Ash was not identified in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


27 January-2 February 2010

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that on 2 February an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 8.2 km (27,000 ft) a.s.l. Ash was not identified in satellite imagery, although weather clouds were present in the area.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 January-19 January 2010

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that on 14 January an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7.3 km (24,000 ft) a.s.l. Ash was not identified in satellite imagery, although weather clouds were present in the area.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


30 December-5 January 2010

The Washington VAAC reported that during 2-4 January thermal anomalies from Sangay were seen in satellite imagery. On 2 January, a pilot saw an ash plume drifting NW at an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. An ash plume was also reported by a pilot the next day.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


16 December-22 December 2009

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that on 18 and 21 December ash plumes from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7.9 km (26,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. Ash was not identified in satellite imagery, although weather clouds were present in the area. Thermal anomalies were occasionally detected in the satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 November-1 December 2009

Based on a pilot observation, the Washington VAAC reported that on 1 December an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7.9 km (26,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. Ash was not identified in satellite imagery, although low weather clouds were present in the area. Later that day, an eruption was reported, but ash was again unidentifiable in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 November-17 November 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 16 November small plumes from Sangay, possibly with ash, drifted WNW. A thermal anomaly was also detected.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


14 October-20 October 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 15 October a small plume from Sangay drifted 15 km SW.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


30 September-6 October 2009

The Washington VAAC reported that on 4 October a pilot saw an ash plume from Sangay drifting W at altitudes of 5.2-7.6 km (17,000-25,000 ft) a.s.l. Meteorological clouds prevented satellite views of the area. No additional reports of the ash plume were received by the VAAC.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 July-28 July 2009

Based on a pilot observation, the Washington VAAC reported that on 23 July a possible ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7.9 km (26,000 ft) a.s.l. The plume was not identified in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 June-30 June 2009

Based on a pilot observation, the Washington VAAC reported that on 26 June an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7.6 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. The suspected ash was seen on satellite imagery drifting less than 30 km W.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 June-16 June 2009

Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 15 June possible small ash plumes from Sangay drifted WNW. A thermal anomaly was detected.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 March-10 March 2009

Based on pilot observations and analysis of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 10 March an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. A thermal anomaly was detected in satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 February-10 February 2009

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that on 9 February a plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7.9 km (26,000 ft) a.s.l. No ash was identified on satellite imagery, but meteoric clouds were also present in the area.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


31 December-6 January 2009

Based on a pilot observation, the Washington VAAC reported that on 5 January an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 December-16 December 2008

Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that a small gas-and-steam plume with some ash rose from Sangay on 16 December.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 September-30 September 2008

Based on analysis of satellite imagery, information from the Guayaquil MWO, and pilot reports, the Washington VAAC reported that a minor ash plume rose from Sangay on 24 September and drifted WNW.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


26 December-1 January 2008

Based on observations of satellite imagery and pilot reports, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. on 26 December and drifted SW. A thermal anomaly was seen on satellite imagery during 26-27 December.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 October-16 October 2007

Based on observations of satellite imagery and pilot reports, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. on 12 October and drifted W.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


5 September-11 September 2007

The Washington VAAC reported that ash plumes from Sangay were observed by pilots during 8-9 September. Ash was not detected on satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


15 August-21 August 2007

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay drifted SSE on 19 August. Observations using satellite imagery were inhibited due to cloud cover.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


1 August-7 August 2007

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W on 2 August. Ash was not detected on satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 July-31 July 2007

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 6.7-8.2 km (22,000 to 27,000 ft) a.s.l. on 28 July. Ash was not detected on satellite imagery but a weak hotspot could be seen.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 July-24 July 2007

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W on 23 July. Ash was not detected on satellite imagery. On 24 July, a diffuse ash plume at an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. was visible on satellite imagery drifting SW.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 July-10 July 2007

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude between 5.2-7.9 km (17,000-26,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W on 3 July.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 May-29 May 2007

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7.3 km (24,000 ft) a.s.l. on 24 May.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


2 May-8 May 2007

Based on pilot observations, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay rose to altitudes of 5.2-7.6 km (17,000-25,000 ft) a.s.l. on 4 May. On 5 May, a possible narrow ash plume was visible on satellite imagery drifting W.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 March-27 March 2007

Based on information from IG, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay was present on 22 March. The altitude and drift direction of the plume were not reported.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


14 March-20 March 2007

Based on pilot reports and satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay on 17 March rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. A hotspot was visible on satellite imagery. A pilot reported an ash plume on 20 March to an unreported altitude.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 March-13 March 2007

Based on information from IG, pilot reports, and satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that eruptions from Sangay during 12-13 March produced ash plumes that rose to 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. A hotspot was seen on satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


28 February-6 March 2007

Based on information from the Guayaquil MWO and satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that an eruption from Sangay on 28 February produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 7.6 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. On 2 March, a diffuse plume and a weak hotspot were seen on satellite imagery. On 5 March, a pilot reported that an ash plume rose to between 5.2-6.1 km (17,000-20,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 February-27 February 2007

The Washington VAAC reported eruptions from Sangay based on information from Guayaquil MWO, IG, pilot reports, and satellite imagery. Ash plumes reached altitudes of 10.7 km (35,000 ft) a.s.l. on 23 February and 6.4 km (21,000 ft) a.s.l. on 25 February. Plumes drifted S and SW, respectively.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 February-13 February 2007

Based on information from Guayaquil MWO, IG, pilot reports, and satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that eruptions from Sangay during 6-10 and 13 February produced ash plumes that drifted SW, NW, N, and W. Plumes reached altitudes of 9 km (30,000 ft) a.s.l. on 6 February and 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. on 9 February. A hotspot was seen on satellite imagery at the summit during 7-9 and 13 February.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


31 January-6 February 2007

Based on information from the Guayaquil MWO and satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that an eruption from Sangay on 6 February produced ash plumes that rose to a maximum altitude of 9.1 km (30,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 January-30 January 2007

Based on information from Guayaquil MWO, the Washington VAAC reported that an eruption from Sangay on 28 January produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 6.4 km (21,000 ft) a.s.l.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 January-23 January 2007

Based on pilot reports, the Washington VAAC reported that an eruption from Sangay produced an ash plume on 20 January. The altitude and direction of the plume were not reported.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 January-16 January 2007

Based on information from Guayaquil Meteorological Watch Office (MWO), pilot reports, and satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that an eruption from Sangay on 14 January produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


27 December-2 January 2007

Based on information from Guayaquil Meteorological Watch Office (MWO) and satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that an eruption from Sangay on 1 January produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 December-26 December 2006

Based on a pilot report, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Sangay rose to an altitude of 7.6 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. on 23 December.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 November-5 December 2006

Based on pilot reports and satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that an eruption from Sangay on 2 December produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 8.5 km (28,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 November-28 November 2006

According to the Washington VAAC, an eruption from Sangay on 22 November produced an ash plume observed on satellite imagery that drifted WNW.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 October-24 October 2006

Based on a pilot report, the Washington VAAC reported that on 21 October, emission plumes from Sangay reached altitudes of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 October-17 October 2006

Based on information from Guayaquil MWO and a pilot report, the Washington VAAC reported on 11 October that emission plumes from Sangay reached altitudes of 2.7 km (9,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


26 October-1 November 2005

Based on information from IG, the Washington VAAC reported that ash was seen over Sangay on 26 October at 0758. No ash was visible on satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


12 October-18 October 2005

An ash plume emitted from Sangay was visible on satellite imagery on 16 October around 0645. The plume moved SSW very slowly, corresponding to a possible height of ~6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. By 0900 the plume was too thin to be visible on satellite imagery and thunderstorms developed in the area, further obscuring the ash cloud.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 December-28 December 2004

According to the Washington VAAC, on 28 December around 0715 satellite imagery showed a plume from Sangay that was most likely composed of steam with little ash. The plume was E of the volcano's summit at a height of ~6.4 km a.s.l. A hotspot was prominent on satellite imagery, but ash was more difficult to distinguish.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


28 April-4 May 2004

Based on a pilots report, the Washington VAAC reported that ash from an eruption at Sangay produced a plume to a height of ~6 km a.s.l. on 1 May at 1750. Ash was not visible on satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 January-27 January 2004

Satellite imagery on 27 January showed a narrow ash plume emitted from Sangay that was at a height of ~6 km a.s.l. and drifting SW.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


14 January-20 January 2004

According to the Washington VAAC, satellite imagery showed a plume emitted from Sangay on 14 January around 0500 extendeding ~45 km E. The plume most likely contained ash. During this time a hotspot was also visible on satellite imagery.

Sources: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), New Zealand Herald


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1934 Aug 8 2013 May 23 (continuing) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1728 Sep 30 ± 30 days 1916 (in or before) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1628 Oct Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Hall M L, 1977. El Volcanismo en El Ecuador. Quito: Biblioteca Ecuador, 120 p.

Hall M L, 1987. . (pers. comm.).

Hantke G, Parodi I, 1966. Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 19: 1-73.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Johnson J B, Aster R C, Ruiz M C, Malone S D, McChesney P J, Lees J M, Kyle P R, 2003. Interpretation and utility of infrasonic records from erupting volcanoes. J Volc Geotherm Res, 121: 15-63.

Johnson J B, Lees J M, 2000. Plugs and chugs--seismic and acoustic observations of degassing explosions at Karymsky, Russia and Sangay, Ecuador. J Volc Geotherm Res, 101: 67-82.

Monzier M, Robin C, Samaniego P, Hall M L, Cotten J, Mothes P, Arnaud N, 1999. Sangay volcano, Ecuador: structural development, present activity and petrology. J Volc Geotherm Res, 90: 49-79.

Smithsonian Institution-GVN, 1990-. [Monthly event reports]. Bull Global Volc Network, v 15-33.

The isolated Sangay volcano, located east of the Andean crest, is the southernmost of Ecuador's volcanoes, and its most active. The dominantly andesitic volcano has been in frequent eruption for the past several centuries. The steep-sided, 5230-m-high glacier-covered volcano grew within horseshoe-shaped calderas of two previous edifices, which were destroyed by collapse to the east, producing large debris avalanches that reached the Amazonian lowlands. The modern edifice dates back to at least 14,000 years ago. Sangay towers above the tropical jungle on the east side; on the other sides flat plains of ash from the volcano have been sculpted by heavy rains into steep-walled canyons up to 600 m deep. The earliest report of a historical eruption was in 1628. More or less continuous eruptions were reported from 1728 until 1916, and again from 1934 to the present. The more or less constant eruptive activity has caused frequent changes to the morphology of the summit crater complex.