Sumaco

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  • Ecuador
  • Ecuador
  • Stratovolcano
  • 1895 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 0.538°S
  • 77.626°W

  • 3990 m
    13087 ft

  • 352040
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Sumaco.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Sumaco.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1933 Feb ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1895 ± 30 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1650 ± 50 years ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 3  

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Barragan R, Geist D, Hall M, Larson P, Kurz M, 1998. Subduction controls on the compositions of lavas from the Ecuadorian Andes. Earth Planet Sci Lett, 154: 153-166.

Hall M L, 1992. . (pers. comm.).

Hall M L, 1977. El Volcanismo en El Ecuador. Quito: Biblioteca Ecuador, 120 p.

Hantke G, Parodi I, 1966. Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 19: 1-73.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Lewis G E, Tschopp H J, Marks J G, 1956. Ecuador. In: Jenks W F (ed) {Handbook of South American Geol}, Geol Soc Amer Mem 65: 249-292.

The forested Sumaco stratovolcano rises 2800 m above the jungles of the western Amazon basin, east of Antisana volcano, and occupies an isolated position far to the east of the main Andes volcanic axis. Constructed over Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, 3990-m-high Sumaco forms a relatively symmetrical cone in an area of heavy rainfall and erosion. Sumaco has produced alkaline tephritic, basanitic, and phonolitic rocks distinct from those of the main Andean chain. The volcano has a broad summit crater, 300 x 400 m wide, containing a central cone. Reports of historical eruptions are somewhat ambiguous; an eruption is inferred in the 18th or early-19th century on the basis of changes in crater morphology.