Chacana

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 0.375°S
  • 78.25°W

  • 4643 m
    15229 ft

  • 352022
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Chacana.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Chacana.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1773 Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations South part of caldera
1760 Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations SW flank
0050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology
1580 BCE ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
8050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Beate B, Salgado R, 2005. Geothermal country update for Ecuador, 2000-2005. Proc World Geotherm Cong 2005, Antalya, Turkey, 24-29 April 2005, 5 p.

Hall M L, 1992. . (pers. comm.).

Hall M L, Mothes P, 1997. Chacana caldera--the largest rhyolitic eruptive center in the northern Andes. IAVCEI 1997 General Assembly, Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Abs, p 14.

Hantke G, Parodi I, 1966. Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 19: 1-73.

Chacana is a massive, eroded caldera complex of Pliocene-Holocene age that forms one of the largest rhyolitic centers of the northern Andes. The caldera is 32-km long in the N-S direction and 18-24 km wide in the E-W direction. Chacana was constructed during three cycles of andesitic-to-rhyolitic volcanism, with major eruptions about 240,000, 180,00, and 160,000 years ago. Dacitic lava flows were erupted from caldera-floor fissures between about 30,000 and 21,000 years ago. Numerous lava domes were constructed within the caldera, which has been the source of frequent explosive eruptions throughout the Holocene as well as historical lava flows during the 18th century. The massive Antisana stratovolcano was constructed immediately to the SE.