Telica

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Nicaragua
  • Nicaragua
  • Stratovolcano(es)
  • 2011 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 12.602°N
  • 86.845°W

  • 1061 m
    3480 ft

  • 344040
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

12 September-18 September 2012

During 10-11 September INETER reported "jet" sounds from Telica, two incandescent fumaroles, and gas-and-steam plumes rising 100-200 m above the crater. On 11 September two small explosions occurred in the crater. During 12-14 and 17 September gas plumes rose 30-150 m and incandescence from the crater was observed. Gas measurements on 14 and 17 September showed normal levels of sulfur dioxide emissions.

Source: Instituto Nicaragüense de Estudios Territoriales (INETER)



 Available Weekly Reports


2012: September
2011: May
2007: January | February


12 September-18 September 2012

During 10-11 September INETER reported "jet" sounds from Telica, two incandescent fumaroles, and gas-and-steam plumes rising 100-200 m above the crater. On 11 September two small explosions occurred in the crater. During 12-14 and 17 September gas plumes rose 30-150 m and incandescence from the crater was observed. Gas measurements on 14 and 17 September showed normal levels of sulfur dioxide emissions.

Source: Instituto Nicaragüense de Estudios Territoriales (INETER)


18 May-24 May 2011

INETER reported that during April seismicity at Telica increased, with earthquake magnitudes ranging up to 3.3 and some explosions detected. On 14 May at approximately 2310 a series of explosions were detected by the seismic network and were accompanied by ash and gas emissions. Tephra fall was reported in La Quemada, 4 km N. During the previous few days residents in nearby communities observed reddish colored gas plumes, and those living on the flanks felt earthquakes. On 16 May the seismic network registered three explosions that were accompanied by gas-and-tephra emissions. One plume rose 1.2 km above the crater. Nearby communities to the SE, including Cristo Rey, Las Colinas, and La Quemada, were affected by the emissions.

During 17-18 May another series of small explosions was detected. A gas-and-ash plume rose 600 m above the crater. On 18 May an explosion that lasted 6 minutes produced an ash plume that rose 2.6 km above the crater. Fifteen explosions during 18-19 May were accompanied by gas-and-ash plumes that rose 500-800 m high. Women and children living on the flanks were evacuated. Explosions continued to be detected during 19-20 May with gas-and-ash plumes again rising 500-800 m above the crater. Residents on the N flank in the community of El Ñajo reported that new fumaroles had opened, prompting authorizes to plan for monitoring all wells within a 5-km-radius of Telica. During 20-21 May activity decreased. An observer reported four strong explosions and gas-and-tephra plumes that rose 500-700 m high.

Source: Instituto Nicaragüense de Estudios Territoriales (INETER)


11 May-17 May 2011

Based on reports from INETER, the Washington VAAC stated that emissions of gas-and-ash from Telica were detected on 15 May, and ash fell in areas 4 km N. Seismicity was elevated for a period of time.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


14 February-20 February 2007

The Washington VAAC reported that continuous emissions of ash from Telica were visible on a web-camera on 15 February. A resultant plume rose to an altitude of 1.5 km (5,000 ft) a.s.l. Based on satellite imagery, the plume drifted SW and a hotspot was present at the summit.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


3 January-9 January 2007

On 9 January, INETER reported that a gas-and-ash plume from an eruption of Telica reached an altitude of 1.5 km (4,900 ft) a.s.l., drifted W, and then reached a greater altitude. The eruption was accompanied by increased seismic activity. The Washington VAAC reported that a possible ash plume was visible on satellite imagery and on a web camera, drifting SW.

Sources: Instituto Nicaragüense de Estudios Territoriales (INETER), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2011 May 14 2011 Jun 17 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2008 Jul 5 ± 4 days 2008 Jul 5 ± 4 days Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2007 Oct 28 ± 3 days 2008 Feb 18 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
[ 2007 Jun 12 ] [ 2007 Jun 12 ] Uncertain 1  
2006 Dec 11 (?) 2007 Feb 17 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2006 Aug 4 2006 Aug 6 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2004 Nov 5 2005 Jan 29 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2004 Mar 31 2004 Mar 31 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2002 Oct 17 Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
2001 Jan 17 2001 Dec 19 (?) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1999 May 21 2000 Sep 6 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1994 Jul 31 1994 Aug 12 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1987 Nov 1987 Nov Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Vent in NE corner of crater
1981 Nov 25 ± 5 days 1982 Mar 2 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1981 Feb (?) Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1976 Nov 3 1978 Jan (in or after) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1975 May 1976 Mar Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
1969 Feb 11 1971 Dec (in or after) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1966 Jun 1966 Jun Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1965 Jan 16 1965 Jan 28 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1962 Jan 1962 Jan Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1951 Jul 15 ± 45 days 1951 Oct 15 ± 5 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1948 Jun 1949 Nov Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1948 Jan 1948 Jan Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1946 Apr 1946 Aug Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1943 Dec 1944 Apr Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1941 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1940 Jun 1940 Oct Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1939 Nov 1939 Nov Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1939 Jan 1939 Jun Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1937 Nov 1938 Aug Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1934 Jan Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1929 Jan 1929 Jan Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1928 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1927 Aug 1927 Nov Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1919 Oct 26 ± 5 days ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1918 Jan ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1907 Nov Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1850 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
1791 Jan 24 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
1765 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1743 Apr ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1685 Aug Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1613 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1529 Unknown Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
1527 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Carr M J, 1984. Symmetrical and segmented variation of physical and geochemical characterisitics of the Central American volcanic front. J Volc Geotherm Res, 20: 231-252.

Cecchi E, van Wyk de Vries B, Lavest J-M, 2005. Flank spreading and collapse of weak-cored volcanoes. Bull Volc, 67: 72-91.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Incer J, 1988. Central American volcanic events (1524-1924). Unpublished manuscript, 52 p.

Mooser F, Meyer-Abich H, McBirney A R, 1958. Central America. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 6: 1-146.

Ostapenko S V, Spektor S V, Netesov Y P, 1998. San Jacinto-Tizate geothermal field, Nicaragua: exploration and conceptual model. Geothermics, 27: 361-378.

Ostapenko S V, Spektor S, Netesov Y, Romero F, 1997. Geothermal exploration of El Najo field Nicaragua. Stanford Geotherm Prog Proc, 22: 511-518.

Sapper K, 1925. The Volcanoes of Central America. Halle: Verlag Max Niemeyer, 144 p.

Telica, one of Nicaragua's most active volcanoes, has erupted frequently since the beginning of the Spanish era. The Telica volcano group consists of several interlocking cones and vents with a general NW alignment. Sixteenth-century eruptions were reported at symmetrical Santa Clara volcano at the SW end of the Telica group. However, its eroded and breached crater has been covered by forests throughout historical time, and these eruptions may have originated from Telica, whose upper slopes in contrast are unvegetated. The steep-sided cone of 1061-m-high Telica is truncated by a 700-m-wide double crater; the southern crater, the source of recent eruptions, is 120 m deep. El Liston, immediately SE of Telica, has several nested craters. The fumaroles and boiling mudpots of Hervideros de San Jacinto, SE of Telica, form a prominent geothermal area frequented by tourists, and geothermal exploration has occurred nearby.