Lake Yojoa

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.98°N
  • 87.98°W

  • 1090 m
    3575 ft

  • 343150
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Lake Yojoa.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Lake Yojoa.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Lake Yojoa. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Walker J A, Patino L C, Cameron B I, Carr M J, 2000. Petrogenetic insights provided by compositional transects across the Central American Arc; southeastern Guatemala and Honduras. J Geophys Res, 105: 18,949-18,963.

Williams H, McBirney A R, 1969. Volcanic history of Honduras. Univ Calif Pub Geol Sci, 85: 1-101.

The Lake Yojoa volcanic field consists a group of Pleistocene-to-Holocene scoria cones and collapse pits at the northern end of the scenic north-central Honduras lake (Williams and McBirney, 1969). The volcanic field has produced rocks ranging from tholeiitic basalts to trachybasalts, trachyandesites, and trachytes. The principal NE-trending chain of cones cuts through Cerro Babilonia, the 1090 m high point of the volcanic field, along the same fault pattern that bounds the limestone mountains bordering arcuate Lake Yojoa. Most of the pyroclastic cones, consisting of basaltic scoria and agglutinate, are 100-200 m in height and several contain well-preserved craters. Lava flows radiate in all directions from the cones. The longest flow traveled northward to the village of Río Lindo, where a waterfall cascades down the terminus of the flow. A few Quaternary lava flows occur in the Sulu graben along the Carretara del Norte north of Lake Yojoa.