Conchagua

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 13.275°N
  • 87.845°W

  • 1225 m
    4018 ft

  • 343110
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Conchagua.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Conchagua.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Conchagua.

Conchagua (also known as Cochague) is a conical, but deeply eroded stratovolcano overlooking the Gulf of Fonseca at the SE tip of El Salvador. It is elongated WSW-ENE, and the eastern and southern flanks descend into the sea. Cerro de La Bandera, ENE of Cerro del Ocote, the 1225-m-high summit of Conchagua, appears to be younger in age. Multiple peaks mark the summit of Cerro del Ocote, whose flanks are more dissected than those of Cerro de La Bandera. Recently active fumarolic areas form barren spots on both major peaks of this little-studied volcano. Eruptions reported at Volcan Conchagua for the years 1522, 1688, 1868, and 1947 are erroneous, and may refer to landslides associated with earthquakes.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Conchagua. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Conchagua page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Synonyms

Ocote, Cerro del | Bandera, Cerro de la | Cochague
Conchagua is a conical, but deeply eroded basaltic to basaltic-andesite stratovolcano bordering the Gulf of Fonseca at the SE tip of El Salvador. Cerro de la Bandera, east of Cerro del Ocote, the summit of Conchagua, appears to be younger in age. Recently active fumarolic areas form barren spots on both peaks. Eruptions reported in 1522, 1688, 1868, and 1947 are erroneous, and may refer to landslides associated with earthquakes.

Photo by Gregg Fairbrothers, 1979 (courtesy of Mike Carr, Rutgers University).
Conchagüita (left), an island in the Gulf of Fonseca, and Conchagua (right) a volcano on the Salvadoran mainland are seen here across the Gulf of Fonseca from the NE on the island of Zacate Grande in Honduras. Both Conchagüita and Conchagua are extensively eroded, but a historical eruption was reported from Conchagüita. The NW flank of Isla El Tigre volcano forms the ridge extending into the sea at the extreme left.

Photo by Mike Carr, 1991 (Rutgers University).
Conchagua volcano towers above sandy beaches along the Gulf of Fonseca at the SE tip of El Salvador. The 1225-m-high stratovolcano has a conical profile, but has been extensively eroded. The easternmost of two major summits, Cerro de la Bandera, is seen in this view from Punta el Chiquirín and appears to be younger in age. Recently active fumarolic areas form barren spots on both peaks of this little-studied volcano. Historical reports of eruptions appear to be erroneous, and may refer to landslides associated with earthquakes.

Photo by Rick Wunderman, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).
Conchagua volcano has a conical profile when seen from the NE near Punta el Chiriquín. The volcano actually has a much more complex structure than seen here and has been extensively eroded. It has two principal summits. The eastern summit, Cerro de La Bandera, seen in this view, appears morphologically more youthful and is less dissected than Cerro del Ocote, which forms the 1225 m high point of the volcanic complex.

Photo by Rick Wunderman, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).
The twin peaks of Volcán Conchagua appear in the distance on the left horizon in this view to the east from the summit of San Miguel volcano. Conchagua lies on the shore of the Gulf of Fonseca at the SE tip of El Salvador. The large lake in the center of the photo is Laguna de Olomega. Flat-topped Cosiqüina volcano in Nicaragua is visible in the far distance at the upper right across the Gulf of Fonseca.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Carr M J, 1984. Symmetrical and segmented variation of physical and geochemical characterisitics of the Central American volcanic front. J Volc Geotherm Res, 20: 231-252.

Mooser F, Meyer-Abich H, McBirney A R, 1958. Central America. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 6: 1-146.

Sapper K, 1925. The Volcanoes of Central America. Halle: Verlag Max Niemeyer, 144 p.

Weber H S, Wiesemann G, 1978. Mapa Geologico de la Republica de El Salvador/America Central. Bundesanstalt fur Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover, Germany, 1:100,000 scale geologic map in 6 sheets.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
2,738
50,749
231,112
2,528,256

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Conchagua Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.