San Vicente

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 13.595°N
  • 88.837°W

  • 2182 m
    7157 ft

  • 343070
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

4 November-10 November 2009

According to news articles, heavy rains caused landslides and flooding in the town of Verapaz, about 6 km NW of the summit of San Vicente, during 7-8 November. Mud and boulders swept down the flanks San Vicente, and in conjunction with flooded rivers, buried homes and cars; at least 144 people were killed and about 60 were missing.

Sources: Associated Press, Associated Press



 Available Weekly Reports


2009: November
2001: February


4 November-10 November 2009

According to news articles, heavy rains caused landslides and flooding in the town of Verapaz, about 6 km NW of the summit of San Vicente, during 7-8 November. Mud and boulders swept down the flanks San Vicente, and in conjunction with flooded rivers, buried homes and cars; at least 144 people were killed and about 60 were missing.

Sources: Associated Press, Associated Press


14 February-20 February 2001

There were reports of volcanic activity at San Vicente volcano after a M 6.6 earthquake occurred at 1422 on 13 February. The earthquake caused more than 25 landslides on the flanks of the volcano that reportedly killed 39 people. The Centro de Investigaciones Geot├ęcnicas investigated the activity reports and determined that no volcanic activity had occurred. In addition, the government reported that there was no volcanic activity at San Miguel, San Salvador, or Santa Ana volcanoes.

Sources: Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales (SNET), US Geological Survey Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP), US Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards Program, El Diario de Hoy, La Prensa Grafica


There are no Holocene eruptions known for San Vicente. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Aiuppa A, Rotolo S G, Villa I M, 1999. Stratigraphy, geochemistry and geochronology of a Quaternary pyroclastic sequence of the Chichontepec volcano, El Salvador. Rev Geol Amer Central, 22: 75-86.

Barberi F, Rotolo S G, Aiuppa A, 1995. Petrology of Chichontepeque volcano (El Salvador). Periodico Mineral, 64: 89-91.

Carr M J, 1984. Symmetrical and segmented variation of physical and geochemical characterisitics of the Central American volcanic front. J Volc Geotherm Res, 20: 231-252.

Escobar C D, 1999. . (pers. comm.).

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Major J J, Schilling S P, Pullinger C R, Escobar C D, 2004. Debris-flow hazards at San Salvador, San Vicente, and San Miguel volcanoes, El Salvador. In: Rose W I, Bommer J J, Lopez D L, Carr M J, Major J J (eds), Natural Hazards in El Salvador, {Geol Soc Amer Spec Pap}, 375: 89-108.

Major J J, Schilling S P, Pullinger C R, Escobar C D, Howell M M, 2001. Volcano-hazard zonation for San Vicente volcano, El Salvador. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 01-367: 1-21.

Mooser F, Meyer-Abich H, McBirney A R, 1958. Central America. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 6: 1-146.

Rotolo S G, Aiuppa A, Pullinger C R, Parello F, Tenorio-Mejia J, 1998. An introduction to San Vicente (Chichontepec) volcano, El Salvador. Rev Geol Amer Central, 21: 25-36.

Rotolo S G, Castorina F, 1998. Transition from mildly-tholeiitic to calc-alkaline suite: the case of Chichontepec volcanic centre, El Salvador, Central America. J Volc Geotherm Res, 86: 117-136.

Sapper K, 1917. Katalog der Geschichtlichen Vulkanausbruche. Strasbourg: Karl J Trubner, 358 p.

Sapper K, 1925. The Volcanoes of Central America. Halle: Verlag Max Niemeyer, 144 p.

Siebert L, Alvarado G E, Vallance J W, van Wyk de Vries B, 2006. Large-volume volcanic edifice failures in Central America and associated hazards. In: Rose W I, Bluth G J S, Carr M J, Ewert J W, Patino L C, Vallance J W (eds), Volcanic hazards in Central America, {Geol Soc Amer Spec Pap}, 412: 1-26.

Weyl R, 1952. Estudios Geologicos de la Region del Rio Comalapa, El Salvador. Communic Itic Ano I, San Salvador.

The twin peaks of San Vicente volcano, also known as Chichontepec, rise dramatically to the SE of Lake Ilopango. The modern andesitic stratovolcano was constructed within the Pleistocene La Carbonera caldera, whose rim is visible only on its SW side. San Vicente volcano, the second highest in El Salvador, grew within the caldera to form a paired volcano with summit craters oriented along a WSW-ENE line. The northern and southern flanks are covered by lava flows from the central vent, but lava flows on the eastern side originated from a vent on the upper flank. Volcanism has continued into the Holocene, but the latest lava flows are covered by deposits from the major ca. 260 CE eruption from neighboring Ilopango. Reports of historical eruptions in 1643 and 1835 are false (Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World; Sapper, 1917), but numerous hot springs and fumaroles are found on the northern and western flanks.