Ipala

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.55°N
  • 89.63°W

  • 1650 m
    5412 ft

  • 342190
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Ipala.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Ipala.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Ipala. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Incer J, 1988. Central American volcanic events (1524-1924). Unpublished manuscript, 52 p.

Williams H, McBirney A R, Dengo G, 1964. Geologic reconnaissance of southeastern Guatemala. Univ Calif Pub Geol Sci, 50: 1-62.

Ipala is a small but prominent stratovolcano that extends nearly across the full width of the Ipala graben and rises 750 m above the graben floor. The 1650-m-high summit of Volcán Ipala is truncated by a 1-km-wide crater whose steep, 150-m-high walls tower above a lake. A prominent parasitic cone, Monte Rico, is located on the southern flank; it and other cones on the northern flank lie along a N-S-trending fracture that continues well beyond the southern flank of the volcano. The eastern flank of Ipala is cut by a 17-km long, NNE-SSW fissure that produced a conspicuous line of Holocene cinder cones that fed basaltic lava flows covering about 20 sq km. Diaz reported that in 1865 Ipala ejected ash from January 24 to June. He listed no source and the report seems improbable (Incer 1988, unpublished manuscript).