Ipala

Photo of this volcano
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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.55°N
  • 89.63°W

  • 1650 m
    5412 ft

  • 342190
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Ipala.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Ipala.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Ipala.

Ipala is a small but prominent stratovolcano that extends nearly across the full width of the Ipala graben and rises 750 m above the graben floor. The 1650-m-high summit of Volcán Ipala is truncated by a 1-km-wide crater whose steep, 150-m-high walls tower above a lake. A prominent parasitic cone, Monte Rico, is located on the southern flank; it and other cones on the northern flank lie along a N-S-trending fracture that continues well beyond the southern flank of the volcano. The eastern flank of Ipala is cut by a 17-km long, NNE-SSW fissure that produced a conspicuous line of Holocene cinder cones that fed basaltic lava flows covering about 20 sq km. Diaz reported that in 1865 Ipala ejected ash from January 24 to June. He listed no source and the report seems improbable (Incer 1988, unpublished manuscript).

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Ipala. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Ipala page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.



Cones
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Chichintor, Cerrito Cone
Parada Norte, Cerro la Cone
Parada, Cerrito la Cone
Paxte, Cerro el Cone
Pintos, Cerro los Cone
Rico, Cerro de Monte Cone
Ruedas, Cerro las Cone
Zacarias, Cerro Cone
Zarzona, Cerro de Lava cone 990 m 14° 40' 0" N 89° 37' 0" W


Domes
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Panalvía, Cerro Dome 14° 29' 0" N 89° 38' 0" W
Tempisque, Cerro Dome 14° 30' 0" N 89° 38' 0" W
Ipala is part of a cluster of closely spaced small stratovolcanoes and cinder cone fields in SE Guatemala. The summit of the 1650-m-high stratovolcano is cut by a 1-km-wide crater containing a lake. The eastern flank of the small stratovolcano, seen here from the SW, is cut by a line of Holocene cinder cones and lava flows. Monte Rico is the prominent cinder cone on the south flank (right skyline). No historical eruptions are known from Ipala.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1993 (Smithsonian Institution).
Ipala is a small but prominent stratovolcano that rises about 750 m above the floor of the Ipala graben. The volcano extends nearly across the full width of the graben. The prominent satellitic cone in the shadow at the right is Monte Rico, on the southern flank of the volcano. The eastern flank of Ipala is cut by a 17-km long, NNE-SSW-trending fissure that produced a conspicuous line of Holocene cinder cones and lava flows, out of view to the right.

Photo by Giuseppina Kysar, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).
Volcanic dikes of varying orientation cut oxidized reddish scoria in a quarried cinder cone near the village of Agua Blanca. Several generations of thin dikes are visible (note persons at the lower left for scale). The larger dike supporting the pinnacle at the left-center is oriented north-south, parallel to the direction of faults defining the Ipala graben.

Photo by Giuseppina Kysar, 1999 (Smithsonian Institution).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Incer J, 1988. Central American volcanic events (1524-1924). Unpublished manuscript, 52 p.

Williams H, McBirney A R, Dengo G, 1964. Geologic reconnaissance of southeastern Guatemala. Univ Calif Pub Geol Sci, 50: 1-62.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Cinder cone(s)
Lava dome(s)

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Basalt / Picro-Basalt

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
3,381
25,003
332,154
6,136,659

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Ipala Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.