Cerro Santiago

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.33°N
  • 89.87°W

  • 1192 m
    3910 ft

  • 342150
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Cerro Santiago.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Cerro Santiago.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Cerro Santiago. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Williams H, McBirney A R, Dengo G, 1964. Geologic reconnaissance of southeastern Guatemala. Univ Calif Pub Geol Sci, 50: 1-62.

A cluster of cinder cones and low shield volcanoes surrounds the city of Jutiapa in SE Guatemala. The most prominent feature is Cerro Santiago, one of two coalescing cinder cones capping a low shield volcano SE of Jutiapa. Youthful flows from the twin Los Cerritos cones NE of Jutiapa cross the Interamerican highway. Volcán Culma forms a steep-sided basaltic lava mound immediately east of the city. To the west lies Cerro Gordo (referred to by Williams et al., 1964 as Volcano Amayo), a craterless cinder cone surrounded by basaltic lava flows. It is one of several cinder cones to have produced lava flows that blanket the landscape between Jutiapa and Tertiary volcanic hills to the south.