Fuego

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  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.473°N
  • 90.88°W

  • 3763 m
    12343 ft

  • 342090
  • Latitude
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9 April-15 April 2014

INSIVUMEH reported that during 9-10 April seismic activity at Fuego increased, along with the number and magnitude of explosions. Ash plumes rose 850 m above the crater and drifted 10 km W and SW. Explosions were heard in areas up to 15 km away and shock waves were detected 8 km away. At night incandescent blocks in the Santa Teresa (S), Ceniza (SSW), and Trinidad (S) drainages were noted. During 10-11 April explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500-800 m and drifted 8-10 km W and SW, and caused structures to vibrate in local towns. In a special report from 11 April INSIVUMEH noted that activity had increased. Ash plumes rose as high as 1.1 km and drifted 12 km W. Ashfall was reported in areas downwind, including Panimaché (8 km SW) and Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW). Avalanches descended the Trinity drainage. Activity continued during 13-14 April though cloud cover prevented visual observations; explosions generated shock waves, and sounds resembling avalanches on the S and SW flanks were reported. During 14-15 April explosions produced ash plumes that rose 760 m and drifted 10 km W and SW. Shock waves were detected in areas within 10 km and explosions were heard within 15 km. At night incandescent blocks in the Santa Teresa (S), Ceniza (SSW), and Trinidad (S) drainages were again noted.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)



 Available Weekly Reports


2014: January | February | March | April
2013: January | February | March | April | May | June | July | August | September | October | November | December
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2005: January | March | April | May | June | July | September | November | December
2004: January | February | March | April | May | June | July | August | September | October | November | December
2003: January | April | June | July | September | October | November | December
2002: January | February | August | December
2000: December


9 April-15 April 2014

INSIVUMEH reported that during 9-10 April seismic activity at Fuego increased, along with the number and magnitude of explosions. Ash plumes rose 850 m above the crater and drifted 10 km W and SW. Explosions were heard in areas up to 15 km away and shock waves were detected 8 km away. At night incandescent blocks in the Santa Teresa (S), Ceniza (SSW), and Trinidad (S) drainages were noted. During 10-11 April explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500-800 m and drifted 8-10 km W and SW, and caused structures to vibrate in local towns. In a special report from 11 April INSIVUMEH noted that activity had increased. Ash plumes rose as high as 1.1 km and drifted 12 km W. Ashfall was reported in areas downwind, including Panimaché (8 km SW) and Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW). Avalanches descended the Trinity drainage. Activity continued during 13-14 April though cloud cover prevented visual observations; explosions generated shock waves, and sounds resembling avalanches on the S and SW flanks were reported. During 14-15 April explosions produced ash plumes that rose 760 m and drifted 10 km W and SW. Shock waves were detected in areas within 10 km and explosions were heard within 15 km. At night incandescent blocks in the Santa Teresa (S), Ceniza (SSW), and Trinidad (S) drainages were again noted.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


19 March-25 March 2014

INSIVUMEH reported that during 20-21 March explosions at Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 500-800 m above the crater and drifted 9-10 km W. Incandescent material was ejected 200 m high. Later on 21 March seismicity increased. The number of explosions also increased to 7-9 moderate to strong explosions per hour. Ash plumes rose 750-950 m and drifted 15 km WSW. Shock waves vibrated structures in areas 8 km away, including Santa Sofía (12 km SW), Panimaché (8 km SW), and Morelia (9 km SW). During 22-23 March explosions generated ash plumes that rose 500-800 m and drifted 10-12 km S and SW. Incandescent material was ejected 200 m high. Ashfall was reported in Santa Sofía, Panimaché, Panimaché II (8 km SW), and Morelia. On 25 March INSIVUMEH noted that activity remained high; 8-14 explosions per hour generated ash plumes that rose 850-1,050 m and drifted 12 km W and SW. Ashfall was reported in Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW) and surrounding areas. Explosions again vibrated structures in Santa Sofía, Panimaché, Panimaché II, and Morelia.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


12 February-18 February 2014

INSIVUMEH reported that during 13-14 February explosions at Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 500-1,000 m above the crater and drifted 8-10 km N and NE. Incandescent material was ejected 200 m high, and avalanches descended the Ceniza (SSW), Trinidad, Las Lajas (SE), and Honda drainages. On 16 February explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500-700 m above the crater and drifted 10 km SW, S, and SE. Shock waves were detected 20-25 km away in Escuintla (20 km SSE), Santa Lucia Cotzulmaguapa (20 km SW), Yepocapa (8 km WNW), Alotengando (8 km W), and Antigua Guatemala (18 km NE). Explosions continued during 16-17 February; ash plumes rose 300-1,100 m above the crater and drifted 15-17 km. Incandescent material was ejected 100-200 m high, and avalanches descended the Taniluyá (SW), Ceniza, Trinidad, and Santa Teresa (S) drainages, reaching vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


15 January-21 January 2014

INSIVUMEH reported that during 16-18 January explosions at Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 450-550 m above the crater. A lava flow in the Trinidad (S) drainage was 400 m long and generated avalanches. Other avalanches from the crater descended the Taniluya (SW), Ceniza (SSW), Trinidad, Las Lajas (SE), and Honda (E) drainages. Explosions during 19-20 January produced ash plumes that rose 500-800 m and drifted 10 km SE. Incandescent material was ejected 100-150 high and avalanches continued to descend multiple drainages.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


8 January-14 January 2014

In a special report, INSIVUMEH reported that on 7 January seismicity at Fuego increased. Explosions generated shock waves that vibrated structures more than 15 km away, and rumbling noises were audible 30 km away. Ash plumes rose 4.2 km above the crater and drifted 10 km SW. Lava flowed 500 m down the SW flank and produced avalanches that reached vegetated areas. During 9-10 January Vulcanian explosions generated shock waves detected within 10 km, ejected pulses of incandescent material 100 m high, and produced ash plumes that rose 300 m and drifted 10 km NE. Avalanches descended the Ceniza (SSW), Trinidad (S), and Taniluya (SW) drainages, and lava flows continued to descend the flanks. During 10-11 January explosions produced shock waves, and ash plumes that rose 650 m and drifted S, SW, and W. Crater incandescence was observed at night. During 12-13 January explosions caused shock waves that vibrated structures in Panimaché I and II (8 km SW), Morelia (9 km SW), Santa Sofía (12 km SW), Ceilán, La Rochela, and San Andrés Osuna. Ash plumes rose 350-650 m and drifted 10 km SW and W. Incandescent material was ejected 200 m above the crater and avalanches descended the Taniluya, Ceniza, Trinidad, Las Lajas (SE), and Honda (E) drainages. A 200-m-long lava flow traveled down the Trinidad drainage. Seismicity remained high on 13 January. Ashfall was reported in Panimaché, Morelia, and Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW). A 500-m-long lava flow remained active in the Ceniza drainage. On 14 January explosions generated shock waves audible 8 km away, ejected incandescent material 150 m high, and produced ash plumes that rose 300-800 m and drifted 8 km W and SW. Avalanches again descended multiple flanks. Ash fell in Santa Sofía, Panimaché, Morelia, and Sangre de Cristo.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


1 January-7 January 2014

Based on analyses of satellite images, the Washington VAAC reported that on 30 December 2013 an ash plume from Fuego drifted almost 30 km NW. INSIVUMEH reported that during 2-3 and 5-7 January 2014 explosions generated shock waves, ejected incandescent material as high as 250 m, and produced ash plumes that rose 300-700 m and drifted 7-12 km W and SW. Ashfall was reported in Panimache (8 km SW), Morelia (9 km SW), and Sofía I and II (12 km SW). Avalanches descended the Ceniza (SSW), Trinidad (S), Taniluya (SW), Las Lajas (SE), and Honda drainages.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 December-17 December 2013

In a special report INSIVUMEH noted that activity at Fuego had increased on 15 December. Lava flows were 500 m long in the Ceniza drainage (SSW), and their emission rate rate had increased. Blocks from lava-flow fronts reached vegetated areas. Six to eight explosions per hour produced ash plumes that rose 550 m and drifted 8 km. The explosions generated shock waves and rattled buildings in nearby villages. The next day lava flows were 600 m long in the Ceniza drainage. Explosions generated ash plumes that rose 450 m and drifted W and SW.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


20 November-26 November 2013

On 21 November INSIVUMEH reported that a recent Strombolian phase at Fuego decreased in intensity. Explosions generated ash plumes that rose 450 m and drifted W and SW. Ashfall was reported in Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW). During 21-22 November explosions produced ash plumes that rose 450 m and drifted 7 km WNW, as well as loud rumbling sounds heard within 15 km. Lava flows were 300 m long in the Ceniza drainage (SSW). During 25-26 November ash plume from explosions rose 550 m and drifted 10 km W and SW.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


13 November-19 November 2013

On 18 November INSIVUMEH reported that during the previous week explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 450-750 m and drifted W and SW. Some of the explosions generated rumbling noises, shock waves detected within 15 km, and rattled structures in Panimaché (8 km SW), Panimaché II (8 km SW), Morelia (9 km SW), Santa Sofía (12 km SW), and Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW). A 600-m-long lava flow was active on the SE flank, and block avalanches that descended the Ceniza drainage (SSW) reached vegetated areas. Ashfall was reported in Panimaché, Morelia, and Sangre de Cristo.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


30 October-5 November 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that on 4 November, there was an increase in moderate and strong explosions generating plumes of ash up to 4,500 m a.s.l. The plume extended 10 km and drifted S and SW. Rumbling sounds were strong enough to shake zinc roofs and windows in the towns of Panimaché, Morelia, and Panimaché II. Weak degassing sounds were continuous and resembled the sound of a locomotive train. Pulses of incandescent ejections reached 125-200 m above the summit and caused weak-to-moderate avalanches within the crater. A lava flow that moved into the Trinidad drainage extended 100 m and also generated avalanches. Within the Ceniza drainage, incandescent avalanches traveled ~500 m. CONRED reiterated that the Alert Level remained at Yellow.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


11 September-17 September 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 10-11 September explosions from Fuego generated ash plumes that drifted W and NW. Ejected material formed avalanches within the crater. On 10 September lahars that descended the Taniluya (SW) drainage were 15-20 m wide, 1-2 m deep, and carried tree trunks. The lahars blocked roads in Panimache I and II (8 km SW), Morelia (9 km SW), and Santa Sofía (12 km SW) for two hours. The next day lahars descended the Las Lajas and El Jute drainages (SE); they were 30 m wide, 4 m deep, and carried 2-m-diameter blocks, branches, and tree trunks.

Explosions during 11-12 September produced rumbling sounds and ash plumes that rose 500 m. Incandescent material was ejected 100 m and formed avalanches on the crater rim. A 150-m-long lava flow was active in Ceniza (SSW) drainage. During 12-13 September ash plumes from explosions rose 200-400 m and drifted W and NE. Avalanches from ejected material again formed around the crater. Explosions during 14-15 September generated ash plumes that rose 850 m and drifted 10-12 km W and SW. The explosions produced shock waves that rattled structures in villages within10 km of Fuego. Block avalanches descended Ceniza drainage. During 15-16 September explosions generated ash plumes that rose 550 m and drifted SW, and ejected incandescent material 75-100 m high. Ash fell at the observatory.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


4 September-10 September 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 4-6 September explosions from Fuego generated ash plumes that rose 800-850 m and drifted 10-12 km W and SW. Block avalanches descended the Ceniza (SSW) drainage. During 5-6 September explosions produced shock waves that rattled structures in villages 10 km away.

On 6 September the number and magnitude of explosions increased; rumbling and shock waves were reported 12 km away. Ash plumes rose 750 m and drifted 10 km W and SW. During 7-10 September explosions generated ash plumes that rose 250-400 m; plumes drifted 7 km W and NW on 7 September. Incandescent material was ejected 100 m high and then formed small avalanches. On 9 September heavy rain was followed by lahars in the Las Lajas and El Jute drainages which carried blocks 2 m in diameter. During 9-10 September ash plumes drifted 6 km E and SE.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


28 August-3 September 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 28-31 August explosions from Fuego generated ash plumes that rose 450-550 m and drifted 8-10 km W and NW. During 28-29 August incandescent material was ejected 150 m high, and white plumes rose 350 m and drifted NW. During 30-31 August rumbling was heard 15 km away. Lava flows 200 m long were active in the Trinidad drainage on the S flank and produced avalanches. In a special bulletin on 2 September, INSIVUMEH reported that a series of pyroclastic flows descended the Ceniza (SSW) drainage, reaching the base of the volcano. Ash plumes rose 3 km and drifted E, S, W, and NW. During the night lava from the crater flowed 300-400 m down the Ceniza drainage. Explosions were heard, but cloud cover prevented observations through the morning of 3 September.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


21 August-27 August 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 22 and 24-25 August explosions from Fuego generated ash plumes that rose 300-500 m and drifted W and NW. Degassing and rumbling sounds were also reported. Active lava flows were 300 and 500 m long in the Taniluyá (SW) and Ceniza (SSW) drainages, respectively. On 23 August lava extrusion increased. Ash plumes rose about 1 km and drifted 12 km W. Fourteen explosions during 26-27 August produced ash plumes that rose 200-500 m and drifted 8 km. Incandescent material was ejected 150 m high, and avalanches from the crater descended the flanks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


14 August-20 August 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego during 13-14 August generated ash plumes that drifted 10 km W and SW. Three lava flows were active; one of the flows traveled SW. Five explosions during 14-15 August ejected incandescent material 100 m high, and generated ash plumes that rose 300 m and drifted 6 km. Lava flows were 150 and 300 m long in the Taniluya (SW) and Ceniza (SSW) drainages, respectively. The next day explosions produced ash plumes that rose 550 m and drifted 10 km W. On 17 August 30-m-wide lahars carrying blocks traveled down the Las Lajas, Ceniza, and El Jute (SE) drainages. During 17-18 August explosions that were heard generated ash plumes that rose 200-300 m and drifted 7 km W. Lava flows in the Taniluya and Ceniza drainages were each 400 m long.

During 18-19 August the flow rate increased; the lava flows were 600 and 800 m long in the Taniluya and Ceniza drainages, respectively. Incandescent blocks from the lava-flow fronts rolled down the flanks and reached vegetated areas. Explosions during 19-20 August ejected incandescent material as high as 150 m, and generated ash plumes that rose 400 m.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


3 July-9 July 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego during 3-9 July generated ash plumes that rose 100-750 m above the crater and drifted 4-10 km W and NW on most days. During 4-5 and 8-9 July shock waves vibrated structures in areas including Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW), Panimaché (8 km SW), and Morelia (9 km SW). On 5 July lahars descended the Las Lajas and El Jute drainages (SE), carrying blocks up to 50 cm in diameter.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


26 June-2 July 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego on 26 June generated shock waves and ash plumes that rose 400 m and drifted SW. On 27 June explosions produced ash plumes that rose 550 m and drifted 10 km. Shock waves vibrated structures in areas including Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW), Panimaché (8 km SW), and Morelia (9 km SW). Lahars descended the Las Lajas and El Jute drainages (SE), carrying blocks up to 1.5 m in diameter as well as tree trucks and branches.

On 28 June Vulcanian explosions produced shockwaves felt by local populations within 15 km. Explosions also generated ash plumes that rose 100-200 m and drifted W, and ejected incandescent tephra 150 m above the crater. Ashfall was reported in Panimaché, Morelia, and Sangre de Cristo. A lava flow was active on the flank. During 29 June-2 July explosions generated ash plumes that rose 500-600 m and mostly drifted W and NW.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


5 June-11 June 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 5-8 June explosions at Fuego generated ash plumes that rose 200-500 m and drifted 4-6 km W and NW. The explosions produced weak rumbling, ejected incandescent material 100 m above the crater, and generated avalanches. On 8 June lahars descended the Las Lajas and El Jute drainages (SE), and the Ceniza drainage (SSW). During 9-11 June explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500-1,200 m and drifted 8-12 km W and NW. The explosions again produced rumbling, ejected incandescent material 150-300 m above the crater, and generated avalanches. Shock waves vibrated local structures during 8-9 June.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


29 May-4 June 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that rumbling and sounds resembling jet engines were heard from Fuego during 28-30 May; cloud cover often inhibited visual observations of the crater. On 29 May a lahar carrying blocks up to 50 cm in diameter traveled SE down the Las Lajas and El Jute drainages. On 30 May a plume was observed rising 200 m above the crater and drifting S. During 1-2 and 4 June explosions generated ash plumes that rose at most 800 m and drifted 5-8 km W and NW. Incandescent material was ejected 100 m above the crater and generated avalanches. On 2 June heavy rain caused lahars that traveled down the Ceniza drainage, carrying trees, logs, and blocks. On 3 June diffuse white plumes rose 200 m.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


15 May-21 May 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 16-17 May white plumes rose 300 m from Fuego’s crater and drifted W and SW. Explosions during 17 and 19-21 May generated ash plumes that rose 350-650 m and drifted 6 km W and SW. On 19 and 21 May explosions ejected incandescent material 100 m above the crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


24 April-30 April 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 23-26 April explosions from Fuego generated ash plumes that rose 250-600 m above the crater and drifted at most 10 km W, SW, S, and SE. Incandescent material was ejected 100-200 m above the crater. In a special bulletin on 25 April INSIVUMEH noted that the energy of the explosions had increased, producing rumblings and shock waves that vibrated structures in Panimaché, Morelia, and Sangre de Cristo, as far as 10 km S and SW. A 300-m-long lava flow was active on the S flank in the Trinidad drainage. On 26 April a lava flow in the Taniluya drainage (SW) traveled as far as 400 m. On 28 April activity again increased and 700-m-long lava flows were active in the Taniluya and Ceniza drainages. Incandescent block avalanches reached vegetated areas. Cloud cover prevented observations of the crater. On 29 April explosions generated ash plumes that rose 550 m above the crater and drifted 10 km SSW. Lava flows remained active.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


27 March-2 April 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 27 March-2 April explosions from Fuego generated rumbling noises, occasional shock waves, and ash plumes that rose 0.6-1.3 km above the crater and drifted 8-15 km W, SW, and S. Incandescent material was ejected 100-200 m above the crater. Ashfall was reported in Panimaché I and II (8 km SW), Morelia (9 km SW), and Hagia Sophia. Block avalanches descended the flanks and during 1-2 April reached vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


20 March-26 March 2013

In a special notice on 20 March, INSIVUMEH reported that lava fountains rising 300-400 m above Fuego's crater during the night had decreased along with seismicity and rumbling noises. A lava flow was 1.5 km long in the Ceniza drainage (SSW), and ash plumes drifted SE and S. Explosions during 20-21 and 25-26 March generated ash plumes that rose 0.6-1.2 km and drifted SE, S, and W. Incandescent material was ejected from the crater. Lava flows remained active in the Ceniza drainage and traveled 600 m SW down the Taniluya drainage. Explosions produced ash plumes that rose 400-800 m above the crater and drifted E and W during 21-22 March, rose 300-500 m and drifted 5 km W and NW during 23-24 March, and rose 450 m and drifted W and NW during 24-26 March, which caused ashfall in Panimache I and II (8 km SW), Morelia (9 km SW), and Hagia Sophia.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


13 March-19 March 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 13-18 March explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose as high as 4.5 km above the crater, and drifted SW, W, NW, and NE, as far as 12 km. Explosions sometimes ejected incandescent material, generated rumbling noises, and produced shock waves. During 13-14 March ash fell in Panimache I and II (8 km SW) and shock waves vibrated structures. Ash again fell in the Panimache villages as well as in Morelia (9 km SW) during 14-15 March. Avalanches traveled SSW down the Ceniza drainage during 16-19 March.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


6 March-12 March 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 6-8 March rumbling noises from Fuego were reported and incandescent material was ejected 50-100 m above the crater. Avalanches traveled SSW down the Ceniza drainage during 6-7 March. Explosions during 8-11 March produced ash plumes that rose up to 450 m above the crater and drifted W, SW, S, SE, and E. During 11-12 March ash plumes drifted 10 km and produced ashfall in the Panimache villages (8 km SW) and Morelia (9 km SW). Lava flows were also observed.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


27 February-5 March 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 28 February-1 March explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose less than 250 m and lava flows traveled 300 m S down the Trinidad drainage. Activity increased on 3 March characterized by Strombolian explosions, and lava flows that traveled 1.3 km down the Trinidad drainage and 200 m SW down the Taniluya drainage. Ash plumes rose almost 350 m above the crater and drifted 10 km S. The eruption ended the next day, after 52 hours of activity. White and blue fumarolic plumes rose from the crater. During 4-5 March incandescence 100 m above the crater was observed, and ash plumes rose 200 m and drifted E. Avalanches descended the Taniluya drainage.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


13 February-19 February 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 14-15 February white plumes rose 150 m above Fuego's crater and drifted W and NW. The lava flow traveled 500 m SSW down the Ceniza drainage and produced avalanches. Activity increased on the night of 16 February and was characterized by explosions, pyroclastic flows, and lava flows. A pyroclastic flow traveled 3 km down the Ceniza drainage. Ash plumes drifted 20 km W and SW, and produced ashfall in Panimache I and Panimache II (8 KM SW), Morelia (9 km SW), Santa Sofía (12 km SW), Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW), and Yepocapa (8 km WNW). On 17 February collapses from the lava-flow fronts and pyroclastic flows were observed. Ash plumes rose 3 km and drifted 10 km W and SW. Seismicity decreased. According to the Washington VAAC ash plumes detected in satellite imagery drifted 19 km W, 10 km SW, and 5 km S. INSIVUMEH noted that lava effusion continued and ash fell on the flanks. On 18 February an explosion generated an ash plume that rose 2 km above the crater and drifted 10 km NE. Two other explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500-800 m. Avalanches traveled S and W.

Sources: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


2 January-8 January 2013

INSIVUMEH reported that during 3-8 January explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose less than 350 m and drifted W and SW. Lava flows traveled 300-900 m SW down the Taniluya drainage. During 7-8 January explosions produced plumes that drifted 5 km SW. Incandescence emanated 100 m above the crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


12 December-18 December 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 12-14 December explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose about 140-190 m and drifted SW. Incandescent lava flows traveled 150-200 m down the flanks. During 15-16 December lava flows traveled 200 m SW down the Taniluya drainage, producing incandescent block avalanches from the lava-flow fronts. Explosions during 17-18 December produced ash plumes that rose 400 m and drifted 7 km W and SW. Incandescence emanated 150 m above the crater. Blocks from lava-flow fronts in the Taniluya drainage rolled down the flanks, reaching vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


7 November-13 November 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 8-9 and 11-12 November explosions from Fuego ejected incandescent material 100-200 m above the lava dome, and produced ash plumes that rose 200-430 m and drifted W and SW. Avalanches were generated near the crater. During 8-9 and 11-13 November lava flows traveled 200-500 m SSW down the Ceniza drainage, producing incandescent block avalanches that reached vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


31 October-6 November 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 1-2 November white fumarolic plumes from Fuego rose 100 m and drifted SW. Explosions ejected incandescent material 100 m above the lava dome, and produced ash plumes that rose almost 500 m and drifted 10 km SW. A lava flow traveled 350 m SSW down the Ceniza drainage. On 3 November heavy rain caused lahars that traveled down the Ceniza drainage, carrying tree branches and 2-m-wide blocks. During 3-6 November explosions generate ash plumes that rose 150-450 m and drifted W and NW. Incandescent material was ejected 100 m above the crater and generated avalanches near the crater. A lava flow traveled 600-800 m down the Ceniza drainage, producing incandescent block avalanches that reached vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


17 October-23 October 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 17-19 and 21-23 October white fumarolic plumes from Fuego drifted S and SW. Explosions produced ash plumes that rose 240-640 m above the lava dome and drifted 7 km SW, W, and NW. A lava flow traveled 400-800 m down the Ceniza drainage, producing incandescent block avalanches that reached vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


10 October-16 October 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 10-11 October lava flows traveled 200 m down the Ceniza drainage, on Fuego's SSW flank, producing incandescent block avalanches from the flow front and steam-and-tephra plumes. On 12 October a lava flow on the S flank traveled 800 m. Explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500 m and drifted 10 km S. During 14-16 October explosions produced ash plumes that rose 400 m and drifted W and SW. A lava flow traveled 800 m down the Ceniza drainage, producing incandescent block avalanches that reached vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


3 October-9 October 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that on 3 October a hot lahar descended Fuego's Ceniza drainage (SSW), carrying logs, branches, and blocks. During 4-5 October explosions ejected incandescent tephra 75-150 m above the crater, producing ash plumes that rose 600-900 m and drifted 10 km N and NW. Explosions generated shock waves and vibrated houses in local communities. Avalanches descended the Ceniza and Taniluyá drainages (SSW).

On 7 October the seismic network detected increased activity characterized by tremor, low-frequency earthquakes, and a period of constant explosions. Rumbling was heard and shock waves were detected. Ashfall was reported in Panimache I and II (8 KM SW), Morelia (9 km SW), and Santa Sofia (12 km SW). Incandescent block avalanches originating from the crater descended the flanks. During 7-8 October explosions ejected incandescent tephra 75-150 m above the crater, and generated ash plumes that drifted 10 km S and SW. On 8 October a lava flow traveled 100 m down the Ceniza drainage, producing incandescent block avalanches from the flow front. Avalanches descended the Taniluyá drainage. Ashfall was reported in Panimache I and II, Morelia, and Asunción.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


26 September-2 October 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 26-27 September explosions from Fuego ejected incandescent tephra 75-150 m above the crater, and produced ash plumes that rose 500-800 m and drifted 7 km N and NW. A hot lahar descended the Ceniza drainage (SSW), carrying logs, branches, and blocks over 1.5 m in diameter. During 29 September-2 October explosions ejected incandescent tephra 200 m above the crater and produced ash plumes that rose 500-1,100 m. Shock waves were detected in areas 12-15 km away. Incandescent avalanches traveled 700 m down the flanks; during 1-2 October avalanches traveled S down the Santa Teresa drainage. Ashfall was reported at the observatory, and in Morelia (8 km SW) and Santa Sofia (12 km SE).

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


19 September-25 September 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 19-21 September explosions from Fuego ejected incandescent material 100 m above the crater and produced ash plumes that rose 500-1,000 m. Incandescent avalanches traveled 600 m down the flanks. Ashfall was reported at the observatory, and in Morelia (8 km SW) and Santa Sofia (12 km SE). During 22-25 September explosions generated ash plumes that rose 300-800 m above the crater and drifted 6-10 km NE, N, and NW. Incandescent material was ejected 75-150 m above the crater, and avalanches descended the Ceniza and Taniluyá drainages (SSW).

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


12 September-18 September 2012

In a special bulletin on 13 September, INSIVUMEH reported that activity at Fuego increased, starting the sixth eruption in 2012. Lava flows traveled 600 m down the Taniluyá drainage (SSW) and the Las Lajas drainage (SE), producing block avalanches that reached vegetated areas. Strombolian explosions generated ash plumes that rose 3 km above the crater and drifted SW and 12 km W. Ash fell in multiple areas, including the villages of Panimaché (8 km SW), Morelia (8 km SW), Santa Sofia (12 km SE), Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW), Palo Verde, San Pedro Yepocapa (8 km NW), Santiago Atitlan (42 km NW), San Lucas Toliman (32 km NW), Mazatenango (68 km W), Suchitepéquez, Retalhuleu (86 km W), and Santa Lucia Cotzumalguapa (23 km SW). Explosions produced degassing sounds and rumbling noises, accompanied by shock waves that vibrated structures on the SW flank. Pyroclastic flows traveled down the Las Lajas and Ceniza (SSW) drainages, producing ash plumes. CONRED increased the Alert Level to Orange (third highest on a four-color scale). About 10,600 people evacuated from nearby communities including Yepocapa, San Juan Alotenango (9 km ENE), Sacatepéquez. Evacuation shelters were set up in Santa Lucia Cotzumalguapa.

Later that day seismicity decreased, ash plumes rose 300 m above the crater and drifted W and NW, fewer pyroclastic flows were observed, and the rate of explosions slowed. Ashfall was reported in Panimaché, Morelia, and Sangre de Cristo. Lava flows in the Ceniza drainage were 1 km long and 150 m wide, and in Las Lajas were 700 m long and 100 m wide. CONRED noted that residents began to return to their homes on 14 September.

During 14-18 September explosions generated rumbling noises; ash plumes that rose 400-900 m above the crater drifted 7-8 km W and SW, causing ashfall in Sangre de Cristo, Panimaché I, and Panimaché II. Lava flows were at most 1.2 km long in the Taniluyá drainage and 200 m long in the Ceniza drainage during 14-16 September; flows were not observed during 17-18 September.

Sources: Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED), Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


5 September-11 September 2012

In a special bulletin on 4 September at 1700, INSIVUMEH reported that the eruption from Fuego that began 32 hours earlier had ended. During 6-11 September fumarolic plumes rose 100-150 m above the crater and drifted W and NW. Weak explosions generated ash plumes that rose 300-400 m above the crater and drifted W and NW. During 8-9 September incandescent tephra was ejected to a height of 100 m and caused avalanches in the Taniluyá and the Ceniza (SSW) drainages. A 10-20-m-wide lahar traveled SE down the Las Lajas drainage on 9 September, carrying tree trunks and blocks 1.5 m in diameter. During 10-11 September a lava flow traveled 100 m down the Taniluyá drainage.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


29 August-4 September 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 29-30 August lava flows from Fuego traveled 250 m down the Taniluyá drainage (SW), generating block avalanches that produced gray plumes and reached vegetated areas.

Seismicity increased on 3 September. During 3-4 September constant Strombolian explosions generated ash plumes that rose 900 m above the crater and drifted 8 km S and SW. The eruption was heard in areas 10 km away and vibrated structures in Panimaché (8 km SW), Morelia (8 km SW), and Santa Sofia (12 km SE). Lava was ejected 100 m high and spilled over the crater rim. Lava flows traveled 3 km down the Taniluyá and the Ceniza (SSW) drainages, producing block avalanches that again reached vegetated areas. A third lava flow descended the Las Lajas drainage (SE). Pyroclastic flows traveled SE. Ash plumes drifted 10-12 km S and SW, and produced ashfall in Panimaché, Morelia, Santa Lucía, Cotzumalguapa, Tierra Linda, and Popoya.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


22 August-28 August 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that on 22 August the seismic network at Fuego detected lahars that traveled SE down the Las Lajas and El Jute drainages. During 22-27 August lava flows traveled 150-300 m down the Taniluyá drainage (SW) and as far as 400 m down the Ceniza drainage (SSW), generating incandescent block avalanches that reached vegetated areas. Incandescent material was ejected 100 m above the crater. White plumes rose to low heights and drifted SW, W, and NW.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


15 August-21 August 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 15-16 and 18-21 August lava flows from Fuego traveled 250-500 m down the Taniluyá drainage (SW), generating block avalanches that reached vegetated areas. On 17 August 20-m-wide lahars traveled SE down the Las Lajas and El Júte drainages, carrying blocks 1.5 m in diameter. Steam rose from the deposits in Las Lajas. Explosions were heard during 18-29 August but weather conditions prevented observations. Explosions during 19-21 August produced ash plumes that rose 100-300 m above the crater and drifted N, NW, W, and SW. Incandescent material was ejected 40-100 m above the crater at night. In a special report issued on 21 August, INSIVUMEH stated that seismicity had increased, along with degassing and rumbling sounds. Incandescent material was ejected 150 m above the crater, and lava flows traveled 500 m down the El Júte and Taniluyá drainages, generating block avalanches that reached vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


8 August-14 August 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 9-10 and 13-14 August explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 300-400 m above the crater and drifted NW and W. Degassing sounds were reported, and diffuse white plumes rose 100-150 m and drifted NE and NW. Lava flows traveled 200-250 m down the Taniluyá drainage (SW), generating block avalanches that reached vegetated areas. On 10 August lahars 25 m wide traveled SE down the Las Lajas and El Júte drainages carrying blocks 1-2 m in diameter. Explosions during 13-14 August ejected incandescent tephra 100 m above the crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


1 August-7 August 2012

In a special bulletin on 3 August, INSIVUMEH reported a new phase of activity at Fuego, characterized by increased seismicity and degassing sounds. Incandescent tephra was ejected 200 m high and a lava flow traveled 500 m down the SW flank into the Taniluya drainage. Pyroclastic flows likely descended the SE and SW flanks. During 4-7 August explosions produced ash plumes that rose 200-400 m above the crater and drifted NW and W. Lava flows traveled 250-300 m down the Taniluyá drainage. Detached blocks from the lava-flow front traveled down the flanks to the vegetated area. Blocks also traveled down the Ceniza drainage (SSW). At night during 5-6 August explosions ejected incandescent tephra 100 m above the crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


25 July-31 July 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 26-27 and 29-31 July explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 200-500 m above the crater and drifted NW, W, and SW. Fumarolic plumes drifted the same direction. Explosions ejected incandescent tephra 100 m above the crater. Lava flows traveled 300 m down the Taniluyá drainage (SW) and 150 m down the Ceniza drainage (SSW); detached blocks from both lava-flow fronts produced incandescent avalanches.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


18 July-24 July 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 20-24 July explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 200-400 m above the crater and drifted W and NW. Fumarolic plumes drifted the same direction. Glow radiated 100-150 m above the crater. Lava flows traveled 200-250 m down the Taniluyá (SW) drainage; detached blocks from the lava-flow fronts produced incandescent avalanches.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


11 July-17 July 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that on 10 July lahars traveled SE down Fuego's Las Lajas and El Jute drainages carrying blocks 1-1.5 m in diameter. The lahar in Las Lajas was hot and had a sulfur odor. During 10-12 July explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 150-800 m above the crater and drifted W. On 11 July ashfall was reported in Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW) and surrounding areas. Tephra avalanches descended the Ceniza (SSW) drainage. During 16-17 July explosions generated ash plumes that rose 200-600 m above the crater and drifted 10 km S and SW. Incandescence emanated from the crater and avalanches descended the Taniluyá (SW) and Ceniza (SSW) drainages.

In a special bulletin on 17 July, INSIVUMEH reported that seismic patterns indicated the beginning of a new phase of activity; avalanches on the S and SW flanks were constantly active, and a new lava flow emerged on the SW flank that traveled 200 m and produced blocks that rolled SW down the Taniluya drainage.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


4 July-10 July 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 4-6 July explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 400-800 m above the crater and drifted W. Rumbling sounds were reported and tephra avalanches descended the S flank. During 7-8 July rumbling and degassing sounds were reported. Although cloud cover mostly prevented observations, a weak plume was noted rising 200-300 m above the crater and drifting NE. Ash fell in Yepocapa (8 km WNW), and on the La Conchita and Monteclaro ranches. Small tephra avalanchas descended the Taniluyá (SW) and Ceniza (SSW) drainages. During 8-9 July a series of seven explosions produced ash plumes that rose 300-900 m above the crater and drifted 10 km W, again causing ashfall in Yepocapa, La Conchita, Monte llano, and Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW). Explosions on 10 July produced ash plumes that rose 300-600 m above the crater and drifted W. Incandescence rose above the crater during 8-10 July.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


27 June-3 July 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 28-29 June activity at Fuego increased; explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500-600 m above the crater and drifted SW. Pulses of incandescence rose 200 m and tephra avalanches descended the Ceniza drainage (SSW). According to Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED) on 1 July, seismicity increased and rumbling sounds were audible in areas up to 10 km away. A lava flow 700 m long was active in the Taniluya drainage on the SW flank. In a 2 July report, INSIVUMEH noted that the lava flow on the SW flank was 1,700 m long. Ash plumes rose 500 m above the crater and drifted 10 km W. The seismic network recorded continuous tremor. During 2-3 July explosions produced ash plumes that rose 400 m above the crater and drifted W. A lava flow traveled 400 m down the Taniluya drainage, and blocks from the flows reached vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


20 June-26 June 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 21-22 June weather conditions often prevented views of Fuego, however incandescence was observed emanating 150 m above the crater and an explosion produced an ash plume that rose 400 m. A lava flow traveled 1.3 km SSW down the Ceniza drainage and started a fire in a wooded area. Almost constant degassing on 21 June was heard at the Observatorio del Volcán de Fuego (OVFGO) and detected by the seismic network. During 24-26 June explosions generated ash plumes that rose 200-500 m above the crater. Incandescence from the crater was observed and block avalanches descended the flanks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


13 June-19 June 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 14-15 and 17-18 June explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 300-800 m above the crater and drifted WSW, E, and NE. Explosions generated rumbling sounds and shock waves detected in areas as far as 6 km away. Tephra avalanches descended the SW flank, into the Ceniza drainage, and lava flowed 200 m SW, into the Taniluya drainage. Pulses of incandescence rose 50-75 m above the crater. During 18-19 June lava flows advanced 50 m and block avalanches reached vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


6 June-12 June 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that on 6 June lahars descended Fuego's El Jute (SE), Las Lajas (SE), Ceniza (SSW), Santa Teresa (S), and Taniluyá (SW) drainages, and destroyed roads in Yepocapa (8 km WNW). During 6-7 June explosions produced ash plumes that rose 200-500 m above the crater and drifted N, and 12 km S and SW. Lava flows on the SE flank were about 800-900 m long in the Las Lajas drainage, 600 m long in the El Jute drainage, and 250 m long on the SW flank, and produced blocks that rolled and reached vegetated areas. The explosions were accompanied by rumbling sounds and shock waves that were detected in areas 10 km away, including Panimaché and Morelia (~8 km SW).

During 10-11 June an ash plume rose 1.5 km above the crater and drifted 15 km W and NW. Ashfall was reported in Panimaché I and II, Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW), Yepocápa, and other villages nearby. Lava flows traveled 1.6 km down Taniluyá drainage, 1 km down the Ceniza drainage, and 1.5 km down Las Lajas. Pyroclastic flows descended Las Lajas. During 11-12 June explosions generated ash plumes that rose 300 m above the crater and drifted W. Lava flows traveled 300 m down the Taniluyá drainage. Incandescence rose 100 m.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


30 May-5 June 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that on 1 June hot lahars traveled SE down Fuego's Las Lajas and El Jute drainages carrying blocks 2 m in diameter. During 3-5 June explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500-1,000 m above the crater and drifted W and S. Pulses of incandescence from the crater was observed as well as avalanches on the W flank. Lava flows traveled 700 m down Taniluyá Canyon drainage and 1 km down Las Lajas. During 4-5 June seismicity increased and the lava flow in Las Lajas reached 1.2 km long. Explosions produced ash plumes that rose 600-800 m above the crater and drifted 7 km SW. Shock waves were detected up to 7 km away.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


23 May-29 May 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 22-23 May explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 700 m above the crater and drifted W and SW. Explosions produced shock waves and rumbling noises, and avalanches descended the SW flank towards the Ceniza drainage. Seismic data suggested that on 25 May lava was emitted in the crater, although lava flows were not observed the previous few days. Plumes rose 2 km above the crater and drifted SE, SW, and W. Ashfall was reported in Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW), Yepocapa (8 km WNW), and in the department of Chimaltenango (21 km NNE). A pyroclastic flow traveled SW down the Las Lajas drainage. During 26-29 May explosions produced ash plumes that rose as high as 1 km above the crater and drifted N, NE, S, and SE. A lava flow traveled 200 m SW and avalanches from the lava-flow front traveled 300 m during 26-27 May. Pulses of incandescence 100 m high were observed during 28-29 May.

Sources: Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED), Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


16 May-22 May 2012

On 19 May seismicity at Fuego increased and explosions were heard at 5-10 minute intervals. A 600-m-long lava flow descended the W flank, and a 1-km-long and 20-m-wide lava flow descended the E flank, reaching the base of the volcano. Explosions ejected incandescent tephra 400 m above the crater, and produced ash plumes that rose 5 km above the crater and drifted 30 km S and SW. Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED) raised the Alert Level to Orange (the second highest level on a 4-color scale). Pyroclastic flows also descended the flanks, prompting authorities to restrict passage on part of a highway. Ash plumes from the pyroclastic flows rose 3 km above the crater. Ashfall was reported in Morelia (7 km SW), Panimaché I and II (9 km SW), Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW), and Yepocapa (8 km WNW). Thirteen people from El Porvenir in Alotenango (8 km ENE) evacuated to local shelters. Visual observations and seismicity indicated that activity decreased later that day.

On 20 May a few explosions generated ash plumes that rose 500 m above the crater and drifted 8 km SW. The next day cloud cover prevented observations; however explosions, rumbling, and degassing sounds were reported. On 22 May explosions generated ash plumes that rose as high as 1 km and drifted 10 km S and SE. Rumbling was heard and shock waves were detected. The lava flows were inactive and only incandescence from block avalanches was observed.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED)


4 April-10 April 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 9-10 April explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 100-900 m above the crater and drifted 10-15 km E and SE. Explosions produced shock waves detected within 8 km of the volcano. Avalanches descended the flanks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


28 March-3 April 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 31 March-1 April and 3-4 April explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 500-800 m above the crater and drifted 10 km W and NW. During the night lava fountains rose 100-150 m above the crater and formed avalanches that traveled towards the Río Cenizas drainage. Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 1 April an ash plume drifted 13 km WSW and a well-defined thermal anomaly was observed.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 February-6 March 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 1-2 March explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 600 m above the crater and drifted 15 km W and SW. Ashfall was reported in Yepocapa (W), Sangre de Cristo (W), and Panimache II (SW). Some explosions produced rumbling and degassing sounds. A 300-m-long lava flow descended the SW flank and produced block avalanches that reached vegetated areas. On 4 March the number of explosions increased to about 4-5 per hour. Explosions generated ash plumes that rose 600 m above the crater and drifted 12 km SSW. Rumbling sounds were heard 7 km away.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


1 February-7 February 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 1-3 and on 6 February explosions from Fuego generated ash plumes that rose 400-900 m above the crater; the plumes drifted about 12 km S and SW on 1 February and to the SSW during 2-3 February. On 1 February rumbling noises were heard, incandescence material rose as high as 100 m above the crater, and block avalanches descended the S flank. A new 200-m-long lava flow descended the SW flank into the Taniluya drainage and block avalanches reached vegetation during 2-3 February. On 6 February the lava flow descended towards the Ceniza drainage and block avalanches again reached vegetation. Strong winds caused re-suspended ash to rise 1 km high and drift several kilometers W and S during 1-3 February.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


18 January-24 January 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 18-19 and 23-24 January explosions from Fuego generated ash plumes that rose 200-700 m above the crater; the plumes drifted 8-15 km S, SW, and W. During 18-19 January incandescent material rose as high as 100 m above the crater and at night on 23 January incandescent explosions were observed. Block avalanches descended the S flanks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


11 January-17 January 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 11-13 and on 16 January explosions from Fuego generated ash plumes that rose 400-1,000 m above the crater; the plumes drifted 10-15 km in multiple directions. Explosions generated shock waves and rumbling sounds that were detected to the SW, and windows and roofs vibrated in nearby villages. Avalanches traveled SW into the Ceniza drainage and on the W, S, and SW flanks. At night on 13 and 16 January incandescence emanated from the crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


4 January-10 January 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that on 6 and 10 January weak explosions from Fuego generated ash plumes that rose 300-600 m above the crater and drifted 10 km WNW and 15 km SW, respectively. Rumbling noises were detected several kilometers away. Incandescence emanated from the crater at night and avalanches descended the S, SW, and SE flanks. Based on information from satellite observations and INSIVUMEH, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume drifted SE and later dispersed on 3 January.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


28 December-3 January 2012

INSIVUMEH reported that during 29 December-3 January explosions from Fuego generated ash plumes that rose 400-800 m above the crater; the plumes usually drifted SSW and WSW, but on 30 December they drifted 10 km E and NW. During the week explosions generated shock waves and rumbling sounds that were detected 10 km away. House windows and roofs vibrated in nearby villages. Incandescence emanated from the crater at night, and avalanches traveled SW into the Taniluyá and Ceniza drainages, and S in the Santa Teresa drainage during 29 December-2 January. On 3 January the wind lifted ash to an altitude of 500 m. Based on information from satellite observations, the Washington VAAC reported that a possible ash plume drifted SE on 3 January. That same day, information from INSIVUMEH and satellite imagery indicated small emissions that rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l and drifted SE.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 December-27 December 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 21-27 December explosions from Fuego generated ash plumes that rose 200-800 m above the crater; the plumes drifted 10-12 km W, NW, SW, and S during 21-23 and 26-27 December. During 21-23 and 26-27 December explosions generated shock waves and rumbling sounds that were detected 12 km away. House windows and roofs vibrated in nearby villages on 27 December. Incandescence emanated from the crater at night, and avalanches traveled SW into the Taniluyá and Ceniza drainages, and S in the Santa Teresa drainage. Based on satellite observations, the Washington VAAC reported that a gas plume with possible ash drifted 9 km S on 24 December.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 December-13 December 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that on 9 and 13 December explosions from Fuego produced rumbling sounds and ash plumes that rose 300-600 m above the crater and drifted W, SW, and S. Block avalanches descended the SW flank toward the Ceniza drainage.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


30 November-6 December 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that on 1 December explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 800 m above the crater and drifted to the S. Avalanches descended toward Ash Creek. During 5-6 December ash plumes rose to an altitudes of 400-500 m above the crater and drifted to the W. A 150-m-long lava flow descended toward Ash Creek and avalanches reached vegetated areas.

Based on information from INSIVUMEH, the Washington VAAC reported gas and ash emissions on 2 December and a possible ash plume rose to an altitude of km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. on 6 December.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


9 November-15 November 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that activity at Fuego increased during 8-9 November. Explosions produced shock waves that were detected up to 15 km away, rumbling sounds, and ash plumes that rose 1.5-2 km above the crater and drifted 20 km SW. Ash fell on the SW flank in Panimaché (6 km SW), Morelia (7 km SW), Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW), and Santa Sofía. Block avalanches descended the flanks. During 9-10 November explosions generated ash plumes that rose 600-800 m above the crater and drifted 10 km S and SW. Avalanches descended the SW flank towards the Taniluya and Ceniza drainages.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


19 October-25 October 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 20-21 October explosions from Fuego produced shock waves that were detected nearby, rumbling sounds, and ash plumes that rose 500 m above the crater and drifted W. Incandescence emanated from the crater at night, and avalanches traveled SW into the Taniluyá, Ceniza, and Trinidad drainages. On 23 October, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume was observed in satellite imagery.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


12 October-18 October 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 14-15 October explosions from Fuego produced shock waves that were detected nearby, rumbling sounds, and ash plumes that rose 700 m above the crater and drifted S. A small avalanche traveled S in the Santa Teresa drainage. Cloud cover prevented visual observations during 16-18 October; however, explosions and block avalanches were heard.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


14 September-20 September 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 13-14 September explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 800 m above the crater. The explosions occasionally produced shock waves detected 7 km away. Incandescence at night emanated from the crater and from avalanches on the flanks. During 15-16 September cloud cover prevented observations of the crater but explosions were heard. Block avalanches descended the flanks and an ash plume drifted 7 km W. During 19-20 September explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500 m above the crater and drifted W.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


13 July-19 July 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 13-14 July explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 700 m above the crater and drifted W. Incandescence at night emanated from a 100-m-long lava flow on the S flank. Block avalanches reached vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


22 June-28 June 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 23-24 June explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 150-200 m above the crater and drifted W. Incandescent bursts rose 100 m above the crater. During 23-24 and 27-28 June lava flows traveled 200 m down the Ceniza drainage to the SW and detached blocks reached vegetated areas.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


27 April-3 May 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 28-29 April explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 300-600 m above the crater and drifted SW and S. The explosions sometimes produced shock waves. Lava flows traveled 200 m S and block avalanches descended the Ceniza and Santa Teresa drainages. Explosions during 1-2 May produced ash plumes that rose 200 m above the crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


30 March-5 April 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 30-31 March and 4-5 April explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 200-700 m above the crater and drifted W, SW, and S. Lava flows traveled almost 200 m SW down the Ceniza drainage and produced block avalanches from lava-flow fronts. Crater incandescence was observed at night.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


16 March-22 March 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 17-18 and 20-22 March explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 300-600 m above the crater and drifted 5-8 km W, SW, and S. Incandescent material was ejected as high as 100 m above the crater. Avalanches traveled SW, into the Taniluyá, Santa Teresa, Ceniza, and Trinidad drainages.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


23 February-1 March 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 24-25 and 27-28 February explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 500-700 m above the crater and drifted W and SW. Incandescent material was ejected as high as 100 m above the crater. Avalanches traveled SW, descending the Taniluyá, Ceniza, and Trinidad drainages.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


16 February-22 February 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 16-17 and 20-22 February explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 300-800 m above the crater. Some plumes drifted E. Incandescent material was ejected as high as 100 m above the crater. Avalanches traveled E as well as SW, descending the Taniluyá, Santa Teresa, Ceniza, and Trinidad drainages.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


9 February-15 February 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 9-10 and 13-14 February explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 300-800 m above the crater and drifted W, NW, N, and NE. The explosions generated shock waves that rattled structures in Panimaché and Sangre de Cristo. Crater incandescence was observed at night and avalanches descended the flanks. Fine ashfall was reported in communities downwind during 9-10 February, including Panimaché I and II (8 km SW), Morelia (9 km SW), and Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW).

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


2 February-8 February 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 2-3 February Fuego produced 27 explosions with ash plumes that rose 300-500 m above the crater and drifted 7 km W and SW. The explosions generated shock waves detected as far away as 5 km W and SW, in Sangre de Cristo, Panimache I and II, and Morelia. Block avalanches descended the Santa Teresa, Taniluyá, Cenizas, and Trinidad drainages to the SW. During 6-8 February explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500 m above the crater and drifted W and SW. At night incandescence was observed emanating from the crater and explosions sometimes ejected incandescent material 100 m above the crater rim.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


19 January-25 January 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 19-20 and 23-24 January explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 500-800 m above the crater and drifted W, NW, and S. Incandescent material was ejected as high as 100 m above the crater. Rumbling and degassing sounds were noted, and avalanches descended a few drainages.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


12 January-18 January 2011

On 10 January, INSIVUMEH reported an increase in the number and magnitude of explosions from Fuego since mid-December. During the previous three days explosions had produced ash plumes that rose 1 km above the crater and drifted 25 km mainly S and SW, and remained in the atmosphere for several hours. INSIVUMEH recommended that civil aviation authorities restrict flying within 25 km S and SW of Fuego. During 13-14 and 16-18 January explosions produced ash plumes that rose 200-500 m above the crater and drifted SW, E, and NE. Rumbling was heard and shock waves were detected. At night during 13-14 January, explosions ejected incandescent material as high as 75 m above the crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


5 January-11 January 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 5-6 January explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 500-800 m above the crater and drifted 10 km S and SW. The explosions caused windows and roofs to rattle in areas 6 km away. Fine ashfall was reported in communities downwind including Panimaché (6 km SW), Morelia (7 km SW), and Yepocapa (8 km WNW). Incandescence from the crater was observed at night. On 8 January, the Washington VAAC reported multiple gas-and-ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. were observed in satellite imagery. During 10-11 January INSIVUMEH again reported that explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500-800 m above the crater and shock waves that were detected as far away as 7 km. Plumes drifted 15 km W and block avalanches descended a few drainages.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 December-4 January 2011

INSIVUMEH reported that during 29-30 December explosions from Fuego, almost constant at times, produced dense ash plumes that rose 600-800 m above the crater and drifted 8 km W and SW. Avalanches occurred on the flanks. The Washington VAAC reported that several small emissions observed in satellite imagery drifted W on 1 January. INSIVUMEH noted that during 3-4 January explosions generated ash plumes that rose 800-1,000 m above the crater and fanned out towards the S and SW. The plumes drifted almost 15 km and caused ashfall in areas downwind, including Panimaché (6 km SW), Morelia (7 km SW), and Santa Sofia (12 km SW). Incandescence from the crater was observed at night.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 December-28 December 2010

On 22 December, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Fuego observed in satellite imagery drifted 28 km NW. INSIVUMEH reported that on 23 December explosions produced ash plumes that rose 600-1,200 m above the crater and drifted 10-15 km SE. Explosions the next day generated ash plumes 400 m above the crater. Incandescent material was ejected 100 m above the crater at night during 27-28 December. On 28 December ash plumes from explosions rose as high as 500 m above the crater and drifted more than 5 km S and SW. Avalanches descended multiple drainages.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


15 December-21 December 2010

On 17 December, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 300-800 m above the crater and drifted E and SE. Later that day the number of explosions increased, occurring at a rate of 12-15 per hour. Ash plumes rose 500-900 m above the crater and drifted E and NE. Ashfall was reported in Antigua Guatemala, 18 km NE, and San Juan Alotenango, 9 km ENE. On 20 December, weak explosions generated ash plumes that rose 500 m above the crater and drifted W and NW, and occasional rumbling noises.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


8 December-14 December 2010

On 8 December, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 500 m above the crater and drifted S and SW. The Washington VAAC stated that on 10 December an ash plume was observed in satellite imagery. During 13-14 December, INSIVUMEH again reported explosions; ash plumes rose 400-900 m above the crater and drifted S and SE. Some of the explosions were heard 10 km away and generated shock waves that rattled structures nearby, including Panimache (8 km SW), Morelia (10 km SW), Santa Sofía, and Yucales (12 km SW). Avalanches descended the S and W flanks. At night, incandescent material was ejected 100 m high.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


1 December-7 December 2010

Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 4 December a diffuse plume of gas and possibly ash drifted SW. On 6 December, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions produced ash plumes that rose 900 m above the crater and drifted 6 km SW.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 November-23 November 2010

During 18-22 November, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose as high as 1 km above the crater and drifted S, SW, and W. Incandescent material was ejected 100 m above the crater and avalanches occurred. Ashfall was reported in areas downwind, including in villages 10 km W. Some explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises and shock waves detected as far away as 8 km.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


10 November-16 November 2010

On 12 November, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 800 m above the crater and drifted S and SW. At night, incandescent material was ejected to low heights above the crater. Avalanches occurred around the crater rim. Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that during 12-13 November ash plumes drifted as far as 37 km SW.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


27 October-2 November 2010

During 28-29 October, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 300-600 m above the crater. Incandescent material was ejected 75 m above the crater, and rumbling and degassing sounds were occasionally heard. Avalanches descended the W flank. On 18 October, ashfall was reported in Sangre de Cristo, 10 km WSW. Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 31 October an ash cloud was detected up to 20 km W of Fuego.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 October-26 October 2010

During 21-22 and 26 October, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 500-700 m above the SW crater. Rumbling and degassing sounds were occasionally heard, and incandescence was observed at night. Block avalanches occurred on the flanks. On 26 October, ash plumes drifted N and NW, and incandescent material was ejected 75 m above the crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


29 September-5 October 2010

INSIVUMEH reported that on 2 October a seismic station near Fuego recorded some explosions and a possible lahar that traveled SE. Weather prevented visual observations. During 4-5 October, explosions ejected incandescent material above the crater and produced ash plumes that rose 500-700 m above the crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


11 August-17 August 2010

During 12-17 August, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.7 km (13,500-15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and NW. Rumbling and "degassing" sounds were associated with the explosions. At night during 15-16 August explosions ejected incandescent material 100 m above the crater. On 17 August blocks descended the S flanks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


14 July-20 July 2010

INSIVUMEH reported on 19 July that six explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4.4 km (14,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and SW. Rumbling and "degassing" sounds were associated with the explosions. Light ashfall was reported in Sangre de Cristo, 10 km WSW. The seismic network had recorded a total of 17 explosions within the previous 24 hours.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


9 June-15 June 2010

INSIVUMEH reported that during 10-11 June multiple explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.3 km (13,500-14,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW. Rumbling and "degassing" sounds were associated with the explosions. Occasionally incandescent material was ejected as high as 75 m above the crater and avalanches descended the flanks. Fine ashfall was reported in Sangre de Cristo, 10 km WSW. During a period of increased activity on 11 June, shock waves were detected as far away as 5 km.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


26 May-1 June 2010

INSIVUMEH reported on 29 May that abundant rains from tropical storm Agatha triggered lahars in ravines to Fuego's SW and SE.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


19 May-25 May 2010

On 20 May, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.4-4.8 km (14,400-15,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW. Incandescent material was ejected to heights of 100 m and avalanches descended the S and W flanks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


21 April-27 April 2010

On 26 April, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced gray plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.3-4.6 km (14,100-15,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. A few of the explosions produced avalanches around the volcano, and rumbling sounds were heard.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


24 February-2 March 2010

On 26 February and 2 March, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced gray plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.5 km (13,500-14,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and NE. Avalanches descended the S and W flanks. Weak incandescence emanated from the crater. On 2 March, ash fell in areas downwind.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


20 January-26 January 2010

On 22 January, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced gray plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.4-4.8 km (14,400-15,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 5-12 km SW. Incandescent material was ejected to heights of 75 m and avalanches descended the flanks. Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 25 January a dense ash cloud drifted 15 km NW. The next day an ash cloud drifted 11 km W.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 January-12 January 2010

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 6 January an ash plume from Fuego drifted 45 km SE. On 8, 11, and 12 January, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-4.7 km (13,000-15,400 ft) a.s.l. Plumes drifted as far as 10 km in multiple directions, causing ashfall in some areas. Incandescent material was ejected to heights up to 75 m. Some explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises and shock waves that rattled structures up to 7 km away. Avalanches descended the flanks.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


9 December-15 December 2009

On 11, 14, and 15 December, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.7 km (13,500-15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 8-12 km W and SW. Incandescence from the main crater and rumbling noises were noted. Avalanches descended the S and W flanks. Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 12 December a gas-and-ash plume drifted 20 km W. On 15 December, ashfall was reported in areas SW.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


2 December-8 December 2009

On 4 December, INSIVUMEH reported that multiple explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.2-4.7 km (13,800-15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 15-18 km W. Ashfall was reported in communities downwind. Rumbling noises and incandescent block avalanches were also noted.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


25 November-1 December 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 29 November a small plume from Fuego, possibly containing ash, drifted 10 km SW. A thermal anomaly was also detected. On 30 November and 1 December, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.3-4.7 km (14,100-15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 8-15 km W and SW. Rumbling noises were noted and incandescent block avalanches were generated.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 November-17 November 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 12 November a gas plume from Fuego, possibly containing ash, drifted SSW. On 13 November, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.2-4.7 km (13,800-15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 7 km S. Rumbling noises were noted and incandescence was detected. White fumarolic plumes rose 100 m and drifted S and SW. Small plumes of ash on 16 November were seen on satellite imagery.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 October-27 October 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery and a pilot observation, the Washington VAAC reported that on 20 October an apparent ash plume from Fuego drifted SSW. On 21 October, multiple ash emissions resulted in an ash cloud that drifted 55 km S. Emissions were also reported the next day. On 26 October, a diffuse gas-and-ash plume drifted W. That same day, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.4-4.8 km (14,400-15,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 10 km S and SW. Ash fell downwind, rumbling and degassing sounds were reported, and avalanches of blocks descended the flanks. On 27 October, a few ash clouds seen on satellite imagery drifted 90 km NW.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 October-13 October 2009

On 9, 12, and 13 October, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.6 km (13,500-15,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. Some explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises, and avalanches of blocks descended the flanks. On 9 October, a lahar traveled down the Lajas ravine, carrying blocks up to 50 cm in diameter.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


9 September-15 September 2009

On 10 and 14 September, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.7 km (13,500-15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted as far away as 10 km W, SW, and S. Some explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises and shock waves. Incandescent material was ejected 100 m high and avalanches descended multiple ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


19 August-25 August 2009

Based on information from the Tegucigalpa MWO, the Washington VAAC reported that ash was detected within 15 km of Fuego on 19 August. Ash was not identified in satellite imagery. On 21 and 25 August, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.2-4.6 km (13,800-15,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 5-7 km W and SW. On 21 August rumbling sounds were accompanied by incandescent tephra ejected 75 m high. On 25 August, ashfall was reported in areas to the SW.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 July-4 August 2009

On 31 July and 3 August, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-4.6 km (13,100-15,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. Some explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises. Incandescent material was ejected 75 m high and avalanches occurred on the main cone. Fumarolic plumes rose 200 m and drifted W and NW. The frequency of explosions significantly increased during 2-3 August.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


8 July-14 July 2009

On 10 and 14 July, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.6 km (13,500-15,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 10-15 km W and SW. Some explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises and shock waves. Incandescent material was ejected 75 m high and incandescent avalanches descended several ravines. Fumarolic plumes rose 100 m and drifted S and SW.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


3 June-9 June 2009

On 5, 8, and 9 June, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.7 km (13,500-15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 10 km W, SW, and S. Some explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises and shock waves detected 12-15 km away. Avalanches descended several ravines. Fumarolic plumes rose 150 m and drifted S and SW.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


20 May-26 May 2009

INSIVUMEH reported that on 21 May lahars descended the Santa Teresa and Ceniza ravines to the W and SW of Fuego, respectively, and carried fine material as well as blocks up to 2 m in diameter. During 25-26 May, explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.7 km (13,500-15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W, SW, S, and SE. Some rumbling noises were reported. On 25 May, fumarolic plumes rose to an altitude of 4.2 km (13,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S and SE. Ashfall was reported in areas to the W and WSW on 26 May.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


22 April-28 April 2009

On 24 and 28 April, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.8 km (13,500-15,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 10 km SW. Some explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises and shock waves detected 5 km away. Avalanches of blocks traveled down the flanks. Fumarolic plumes rose 50-150 m and drifted S, NW, and N. On 28 April, incandescent material was ejected 75-100 m into the air.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


25 March-31 March 2009

On 27 and 30 March, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.8 km (13,500-15,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S and SW. Some explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises, shock waves detected 10 km away, and avalanches of blocks down the W and SW flanks. Fumarolic plumes drifted NE and SW. On 30 March, incandescent material was ejected 75 m into the air. Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 31 March an ash plume drifted E.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 March-17 March 2009

On 12, 16, and 17 March, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.2-4.8 km (13,800-15,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S and SW. Incandescent material was ejected 75 m into the air. Some explosions produced rumbling sounds heard in nearby towns. White plumes rose 150-200 m above the summit. During 16-17 March, fine ashfall was reported in areas downwind.

Based on analysis of satellite imagery and SIGMET notices, the Washington VAAC reported that during 12-13 March ash plumes drifted S and SW. On 13 March, the ash plume rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,500 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 March-10 March 2009

Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 5 March multiple ash plumes from Fuego drifted W. On 6 and 10 March, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.2-4.8 km (13,800-15,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 12-15 km S and SW. Some strong explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises, shock waves detected 8 km away, avalanches of blocks down all flanks, and ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. Ashfall was reported in areas to the SW.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 February-24 February 2009

Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 18 February ash plumes from Fuego rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted WSW. On 20 and 24 February, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.7 km (13,500-15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 6-8 km SW. Some explosions produced rumbling sounds and shock waves. Incandescent material was ejected 150 m above the crater. Incandescent avalanches of blocks traveled down the W and SW flanks.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 February-10 February 2009

On 6, 8, and 10 February, INSIVUMEH reported that multiple explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-5.4 km (13,500-17,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S and SW. Ashfall was reported in areas downwind. Some explosions produced rumbling sounds and constant avalanches of blocks descended the flanks. On 8 February, explosions were accompanied by shock waves that were detected 10-15 km away.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


28 January-3 February 2009

INSIVUMEH reported that on 30 January and 3 February, multiple explosions from Fuego produced gray plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.7 km (13,500-15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S and SE. Some explosions produced rumbling sounds and shock waves. Fumarolic plumes rose 100 m above the crater. On 30 January, incandescent material was ejected 50-100 m above the crater and avalanches from the crater rim traveled down multiple ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


14 January-20 January 2009

Based on information from the Central American FIR, the Washington VAAC reported that on 14 January an ash plume from Fuego rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted WSW. On 19 and 20 January, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.6 km (13,500-15,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 7 km NW, W, and SW. Some explosions produced rumbling sounds. Avalanches occurred on the S and SW flanks.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 January-13 January 2009

INSIVUMEH reported that during 8-9 January, multiple explosions (3-5 per hour) from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.3-5.4 km (14,100-17,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 10-15 km S and SW. The explosions produced rumbling sounds and shock waves that were detected 10-15 km away. Ashfall was reported in areas downwind. Constant avalanches of blocks descended the S and SW flanks. Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from the Tegucigalpa MWO, the Washington VAAC reported that on 10 January a diffuse plume drifted W.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


31 December-6 January 2009

Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 1 January two ash plumes from Fuego drifted N. INSIVUMEH reported that during 4-6 January multiple explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-5.1 km (13,500-16,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 12 km W and SW. Ashfall was reported in areas downwind. Some explosions produced rumbling sounds and shock waves that were detected 10 km away. Constant avalanches of blocks descended the S and SW flanks.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 December-16 December 2008

Based on NOTAM's ("Notices to Airmen"), the Washington VAAC reported that on 9 December a possible gas-and-ash plume from Fuego rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l., drifted N, and dissipated rapidly. INSIVUMEH reported that on 12 December explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-5 km (13,500-16,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SSW. The explosions produced rumbling and degassing sounds, and shock waves were detected 10 km away.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


19 November-25 November 2008

INSIVUMEH reported that during 20-21 and 25 November explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.6 km (13,500-15,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and S. The explosions produced rumbling and degassing sounds, and shock waves were detected 10 km away. Lava flowed 150 m W towards the Taniluyá ravine and incandescent material rolled down the flanks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


24 September-30 September 2008

Based on information from the Tegucigalpa MWO, the Washington VAAC reported that on 18 September a possible ash plume from Fuego rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SSW. INSIVUMEH reported on 24 September that a lava flow traveled 300 m W towards the Seca ravine. Avalanches were generated from the lava flow front. Explosions generated ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4.1 km (13,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 August-26 August 2008

INSIVUMEH reported that on 20 August lahars descended several rivers to the S and SE of Fuego, carrying fine material as well as blocks up to 1 m in diameter. Strong currents in Río Cenizas and El Jute were noted. During 25-26 August, explosions produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4.1 km (13,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW. Fumarolic plumes rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. and also drifted SW. A 300-m-long lava flow traveled W towards the Santa Teresa ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


30 July-5 August 2008

INSIVUMEH reported that a lahar descended El Jute River to the SE of Fuego on 31 July, carrying fine material as well as blocks. A report on 1 August indicated that explosions produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4.1 km (13,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and SW. Rumbling noises and shockwaves occasionally accompanied the explosions.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


2 July-8 July 2008

INSIVUMEH reported that on 4 July there were rumbling noises from Fuego and the seismic network detected multiple explosions. A lava flow traveled 100 m W towards the Santa Teresa ravine. A lahar carrying blocks descended the Ceniza ravine to the SW. On 7 and 8 July, explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-4.5 km (13,100-14,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S, SE, and SW. Incandescence at the summit was observed and constant avalanches of blocks from lava-flow fronts descended the W flank.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


18 June-24 June 2008

On 18 June, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and SW. Incandescent material was ejected 50 m above the crater. Constant avalanches of blocks descended the W flank and rumbling and degassing noises were reported. On 20 June, a lahar that was hot in areas, descended the Ceniza drainage to the SW, dragging tree branches and blocks 0.5-1 m in diameter.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


11 June-17 June 2008

INSIVUMEH reported that during 13-17 June, explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 3.9-4.4 km (12,800-14,400 ft) a.s.l. On 13 June, lahars descended the Santa Teresa (W) and Ceniza (SW) drainages and a lava flow traveled 100 m towards the Santa Teresa. On 15 June, rumbling noises were accompanied by shock waves. On 17 June, fumarolic plumes were noted and incandescent material visible at night was ejected about 50 m above the crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


28 May-3 June 2008

During 28-30 May, INSIVUMEH reported explosions from Fuego and ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.4 km (13,500-14,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S and SW. The explosions produced rumbling and degassing sounds, and shock waves detected several kilometers away. Avalanches descended W into the Taniluyá and Santa Teresa ravines. On 2 June, incandescent material was ejected 50-100 m above the crater and a small lava flow traveled 100 m W towards the Santa Teresa ravine. On 3 June, cloudy weather inhibited visual observations, but explosions were heard.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


21 May-27 May 2008

INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes to altitudes of 4.1-4.5 km (13,500-14,800 ft) a.s.l. during 22-27 May. The plumes drifted 5 km SW and ashfall was reported in areas downwind. The explosions produced rumbling and degassing sounds, and shock waves that rattled windows and structures 10-15 km away. During 26-27 May, constant avalanches of blocks descended W into the Taniluyá and Santa Teresa ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


23 April-29 April 2008

The Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Fuego was visible on satellite imagery on 23 April and drifted SW. On 28 April, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions (1 per hour) produced ash plumes to an altitude of 4.4 km (14,400 ft) a.s.l. The plumes drifted 5 km SW. The explosions produced noises audible 15 km away and shock waves that rattled windows and structures in nearby villages.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


16 April-22 April 2008

INSIVUMEH reported that explosions (1-2 per hour) from Fuego produced ash plumes to altitudes of 4.3-4.7 km (14,100-15,400 ft) a.s.l. during 15-21 April. The plumes drifted 5-8 km SW and ashfall was reported from areas downwind. The explosions produced rumbling and degassing sounds, and shock waves that rattled windows and structures 5-15 km away. The Washington VAAC reported that multiple ash plumes were visible on satellite imagery during 18-19 April and drifted mainly SW.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


26 March-1 April 2008

The Washington VAAC reported that multiple ash puffs from Fuego were visible on satellite imagery on 31 March drifting SW and on 1 April.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


19 March-25 March 2008

INSIVUMEH reported that during 22-25 March more frequent explosions (4-5 per hour) from Fuego produced ash plumes to altitudes of 4.1-4.6 km (13,500-15,100 ft) a.s.l. The plumes drifted 6-8 km S and SE. Most explosions produced degassing and rumbling noises, and shock waves that vibrated windows and ceilings within a 5-8 km radius.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


13 February-19 February 2008

INSIVUMEH reported that during 6-19 February explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-4.7 km (13,100-15,400 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic plumes rose to altitudes of 3.9-4 km (12,800-13,100 ft) a.s.l.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


30 January-5 February 2008

Based on observations of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that ash plumes from Fuego rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W on 4 February.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 January-29 January 2008

INSIVUMEH reported on 24 January that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.2-4.5 km (13,800-14,800 ft) a.s.l. ands drifted S, SW, and W. Some explosions produced shock waves that were detected 3 km away. At night, small avalanches of blocks traveled W towards the Taniluyá ravine. Based on reports from INSIVUMEH, CONRED reported on 28 January that the Alert Level was lowered to Green.

Based on observations of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that a narrow plume of gas and possible ash drifted SW on 30 January.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


9 January-15 January 2008

INSIVUMEH reported on 11 January that weak explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.3 km (13,500-14,100 ft) a.s.l. CONRED reiterated that the Alert Level remained at Yellow.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED)


26 December-1 January 2008

Based on observations of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that a probable ash plume from Fuego drifted N on 26 December.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


19 December-25 December 2007

Based on observations of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that ash plumes from Fuego rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. drifted SW on 21 December. Gas or ash plumes were seen on satellite imagery on 23 December and drifted W. According to CONRED, INSIVUMEH reported on 24 December that an ash plume drifted SW. CONRED reiterated that the Alert Level remained at Yellow.

Sources: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED)


12 December-18 December 2007

INSIVUMEH reported on 12 October that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.2-4.8 km (13,800-15,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and SW. Ashfall was reported from areas to the W. The explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises, degassing sounds, and shock waves detected up to 15 km away. The Washington VAAC reported a thermal anomaly along with ash plumes drifting W and NW that were visible on satellite imagery during 15-16 December. INSIVUMEH reported that on 17 December, Fuego returned to normal levels after the 15-16 December eruption. A few explosions were registered by the seismic network and ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4.5 km (17,800 ft) a.s.l. plumes drifted S and SW.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


28 November-4 December 2007

Based on observations of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Fuego drifted W on 29 November.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 October-30 October 2007

Based on observations of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that multiple ash "puffs" from Fuego drifted SE on 26 October.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 October-16 October 2007

INSIVUMEH reported on 10 October that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,000-16,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N and NW. Explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises and sounds resembling an aircraft engine. Avalanches due to collapses from the growing cone in the inner crater descended W into the Taniluyá and Santa Teresa ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


29 August-4 September 2007

On 31 August, INSIVUMEH reported that a lahar, 8 m wide and 1.5 m high, descended W down Fuego's Santa Teresa ravine, carrying fine material, tree branches, and blocks. On 3 September, fumarolic plumes rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and SW. A 300-m-long lava flow continued to advance W down the Taniluyá River valley. Avalanches in the Ceniza River valley were noted. During 3-4 September, explosions produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


22 August-28 August 2007

On 24 August, INSIVUMEH reported that fumarolic plumes from Fuego rose to an altitude of 3.9 km (12,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. A lahar carried tree trunks, branches, and blocks down the Lajas drainage to the SE. A lahar again affected the drainage on 27 August. Explosions on 28 August produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4.1 km (13,500 ft) a.s.l.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


15 August-21 August 2007

Based on a Guatemala City surface report, the Washington VAAC reported activity at Fuego. A hotspot was visible on satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


8 August-14 August 2007

INSIVUMEH reported that on 8 August, a Strombolian eruption of Fuego produced gas-and-ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.8-5.6 km (15,700-18,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and SW. Lava flows advanced and avalanches of incandescent blocks traveled down river valleys, including the Ceniza river valley to the SW. Several pyroclastic flows descended the flanks and ashfall was reported in villages to the W, SW, and S. CONRED raised the Alert Level to Orange (level 3 on a scale of 1-4) in surrounding communities on 8 August, based on a later report from INSIVUMEH.

On 9 August, there was a substantial decrease in vigor of the Strombolian eruption. Explosions produced plumes to altitudes of 4.4-4.8 km (14,400-15,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW. A lava flow traveled 1.5 km SW down the Ceniza river valley and landslides of incandescent blocks were observed. INSIVUMEH issued a report later that day stating that the activity had further decreased to normal levels. A few explosions produced plumes to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW.

On 10 August, CONRED decreased the Alert Level to Yellow. INSIVUMEH reported that the lava flows that were active during 8-9 August were no longer visible. On 10 and 13 August, small explosions produced plumes to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED)


1 August-7 August 2007

INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego expelled incandescent material 50-75 m above the crater on 1 August. Incandescent avalanches traveled 500-700 m down the S and W flanks. Rumbling noises and shock waves were noted at nearby locations. On 2 August, a moderate eruption produced pyroclastic flows that traveled approximately 2 km SSW down the Ceniza River valley. A resultant ash plume rose to an altitude of 5.3 km (17,400 ft) a.s.l. and produced ashfall in areas to the S, SW, and W for several minutes.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


18 July-24 July 2007

INSIVUMEH reported that during 17-18 July, gas plumes from Fuego rose to an altitude of 3.9 km (12,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW. On 18 July, a hot lahar, 20 m wide and 1.5 m high, carried blocks 1-1.5 m in diameter to the W down the Santa Teresa ravine. On 20 July, the seismic network recorded 21 explosions. Associated ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4.1-4.7 km (13,500-15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and SW. Rumbling noises were reported.

CONRED raised the Alert Level to Yellow in surrounding communities on 22 July, based on a report from INSIVUMEH. INSIVUMEH reported that Vulcanian explosions produced ash plumes to altitudes of 4.1-5.2 km (13,500-17,100 ft) a.s.l. and expelled incandescent material 75-250 m above the crater. The explosions were accompanied by rumbling noises and shock waves that rattled ceilings and windows within a 25 km radius. Ashfall was reported from areas approximately 7-8 km to the SW, and incandescent avalanches of blocks rolled 500-800 m down the S flanks towards areas of vegetation. A new lava flow that initiated from an area 100 m below the S edge of the central crater traveled about 100 m.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED)


27 June-3 July 2007

INSIVUMEH reported that on 27 June, a new 100-m-long lava flow from Fuego was observed that somewhat paralleled the previous flow from March/April 2007. The older lava flow on the S flank continued to advance and produce incandescent blocks that rolled W into the Taniluyá River valley. On 29 June, pyroclastic explosions propelled material about 75 m above the crater. Seven explosions produced whitish plumes to an altitude of about 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S.

According to CONRED, INSIVUMEH reported on 1 July that during a Strombolian eruption, lava was propelled 200-300 m above the summit. Resulting lava flows traveled about 800 and 1,300 m to the W. Rumbling sounds were heard and shockwaves rattled windows in near by villages. Ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.9 km (12,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. Multiple pyroclastic flows traveled 1.3-2 km to the W. Based on the report, CONRED raised the Alert Level to Orange in surrounding communities.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED)


23 May-29 May 2007

On 25 May, CONRED reported that the Alert Level for Fuego was lowered from Yellow to Green based on recent communication with nearby communities and monitoring by scientists at INSIVUMEH. During 28-29 May, INSIVUMEH reported that the lava flow on the S flank continued to advance and produce incandescent blocks that rolled W into the Taniluyá River valley. Low rumbling noises were heard during 26-27 May and occasionally accompanied pyroclastic explosions. Additional explosions produced plumes to an altitude of 4.1 km (13,500 ft) a.s.l. and expelled incandescent material about 100 m above the crater. Avalanches of blocks were observed on the S and SW flank. Gray plumes drifted S. Steam-and-gas plumes rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,100 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED)


18 April-24 April 2007

INSIVUMEH reported that on 20 and 23 April, Strombolian activity was observed at Fuego; incandescent material was ejected about 50-75 m above the summit and blocks descended 300 m down the S and W flanks. On 20 April, sounds resembling locomotives accompanied the eruption, and lava overflowed the crater on the S flank and traveled 100 m. The Washington VAAC reported that an intense hotspot seen on satellite imagery on 21 April was likely caused by a lava flow to the SW, according to information from INSIVUMEH. A plume drifting SW was also visible on satellite imagery and may have been a result of fires started by lava flows; the plume may have also contained light ash and gas. On 23 April, INSIVUMEH reported that pyroclastic flows and incandescent avalanches traveled down SE and SW ravines. Ash explosions caused light ashfall in areas S of the volcano and fumarolic and gas plumes rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 March-27 March 2007

Based on satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that a small plume from Fuego drifted E on 21 March. During 21-22, 24, and 26-27 March, INSIVUMEH reported that explosions produced gas-and-ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.7-5.1 km (15,400-16,700 ft) a.s.l. Ashfall was reported from areas 5-8 km SSE and 9 km W. On 24 March, explosions were followed by lava blocks rolling down the W flank toward the Taniluyá River valley and gas emissions. Resultant plumes drifted 15 km SW. Similar activity on 26 March caused ashfall in areas 10-25 km away to the W and SE. On 27 March, the Washington VAAC reported that another small plume was visible on satellite imagery drifting W.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


14 March-20 March 2007

INSIVUMEH reported that incandescent material from Fuego was ejected 200 m above the summit on 15 March. The activity was accompanied by rumbling noises and shockwaves that vibrated windows several kilometers away. Two lava flows were observed; one traveled about 1,500 m W toward the Taniluyá River valley. An ash plume drifted S and SW. On 16 March, Strombolian activity propelled material 300 m above the summit and shockwaves were felt as far as 15 km away. The lava flows from 15 March advanced and three more flows were observed in different ravines on 16 March. Ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.4 km (17,799 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S, SW, and E. Two pyroclastic flows traveled about 800 m; one NW and another W and SW.

Based on pilot reports, INSIVUMEH reports, and satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that ash plumes reached altitudes of 4.1-6.1 km (13,500-20,000 ft) a.s.l. during 15-16 March. A hotspot was visible on satellite imagery both days.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 March-13 March 2007

INSIVUMEH reported on 9 and 13 March that explosions from Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-4.2 km (13,000-13,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE. Rumbling noises were heard from surrounding villages. Lava flows extended ~100-150 m W toward the Taniluyá River valley and avalanches occurred from the lava-flow fronts. On 12 March, incandescent material was ejected about 15-20 m above the central crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


24 January-30 January 2007

Based on a pilot report and information from INSIVUMEH, the Washington VAAC reported that a diffuse plume from Fuego reached an altitude of 4 km (13,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE. A hotspot over the crater was visible on satellite imagery. INSIVUMEH reported that approximately during 21-29 January, incandescent material was propelled up to 100 m above the summit and incandescent blocks rolled about 500 m S and SW down the flanks. During 26 and 29 January, incandescent blocks broke away from lava-flow fronts and rolled S towards the source of the Ceniza River.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 January-16 January 2007

INSIVUMEH reported that explosions from Fuego produced white and gray plumes that rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW on 12 January. Incandescent material was propelled up to 75 m above the summit and incandescent blocks rolled W towards the Taniluyá and Santa Teresa ravines on 12 January and S towards the Ceniza ravine on 12 and 16 January. Based on information from the Tegucigalpa MWO and satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that a faint plume was seen on 12 January drifting W.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


3 January-9 January 2007

INSIVUMEH reported that during 4-5 January, constant avalanches of incandescent material from Fuego's central crater and lateral crater (about 70 m from the S edge of the central crater) descended SW towards the Taniluyá River ravine. Several explosions produced shock waves and gas-and-ash clouds that reached altitudes of 4.2-4.8 km (13,800-15,700) a.s.l. Fine ashfall was noted in areas S and about 9-15 km SW of the summit.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


15 November-21 November 2006

INSIVUMEH reported that on 15 November lava flows from Fuego traveled about 150 m SW and avalanches occurred from the lava-flow fronts. On 17 November, three out of seven explosions propelled incandescent material 100 m above the central crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


27 September-3 October 2006

INSIVUMEH reports noted that frequent explosions at Fuego during 14-29 September sent incandescent lava 75-100 m above the crater rim and generated hot avalanches SW towards the Taniluyá River.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


16 August-22 August 2006

Ash explosions from Fuego reached 300-800 m above the summit (13,300-15,000 ft a.s.l.) on 16 and 21 August. Explosions of incandescent material on 16, 18, and 21 August produced avalanches that descended 300-500 m SW towards the Ceniza, Taniluyá, and Santa Teresa river valleys.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


28 June-4 July 2006

On 29 June, INSIVUMEH reported that pyroclastic flows from Fuego traveled mainly SW along the Ceniza River and a lesser number moved SW along the Taniluyá River. According to a news report, on 29 June an ash plume reached a height of 2.2 km above the summit (19,500 ft a.s.l.) and drifted W. On 3 July, explosions propelled incandescent material hundreds of meters above the central crater (~13,000 ft a.s.l.). Avalanches traveled ~300-500 m SW along the Ceniza River.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Associated Press


24 May-30 May 2006

On 29 May, INSIVUMEH reported that fumarolic emissions from Fuego reached a height of ~125 m above the volcano (~12,750 ft a.s.l.). Lava flows extended ~400 m SW toward the Ceniza River. Avalanches occurred from the lava-flow fronts. Incandescent material was propelled from the crater tens of meters. Plumes reached heights of 200 m above the crater (13,000 ft a.s.l.) and dispersed W and NW.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


17 May-23 May 2006

On 17 May, INSIVUMEH reported that fumarolic emissions reached ~600 m above the volcano (14,300 ft a.s.l.). and drifted E and W. Active lava flows reached ~100 m SW toward the Taniluyá River and ~500 m SW toward the Ceniza River. Avalanches occurred from lava-flow fronts. The Washington VAAC reported a short low-level plume on 18 May that drifted N from the volcano.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


12 April-18 April 2006

On 17 April, explosions at Fuego ejected incandescent material ~50-75 m high, and gas plumes to ~150-200 m above the volcano (12,800-13,000 ft a.s.l.). Incandescent landslides traveled down the volcano's S and W flanks. Lava flowed ~400 m S towards Taniluyá ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


22 March-28 March 2006

During 22-28 March, several explosions at Fuego ejected incandescent material ~50-75 m high and gas plumes to ~300 m above the volcano (13,300 ft a.s.l.). Short pyroclastic avalanches occurred on the upper flanks. On 28 March, lava flowed ~450 m S and avalanches occurred from the lava-flow fronts.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


1 March-7 March 2006

On 6 and 7 March, small ash emissions from Fuego were visible on satellite imagery and reached a maximum height of 4.6 km (~15,000 ft) a.s.l.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


1 February-7 February 2006

During 1-3 February, weak-to-moderate explosions occurred at Fuego. Shock waves from the explosions were sometimes felt in villages near the volcano. Small avalanches of volcanic material traveled down Fuego's S and W flanks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


18 January-24 January 2006

Weak to moderate explosions continued at Fuego during 18-24 January 2006, sending dark gray ash plumes as high as 800 m (2,600 feet) above the crater. Explosion noises could be heard 25-30 km away. Incandescent lava ejections rising 100 m above the crater were seen on the night of 22-23 January that resulted in block avalanches down the SW flank.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


11 January-17 January 2006

During 11-16 January, moderate-to-strong explosions at Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to ~1.5 km above the volcano (or 4,900 ft a.s.l.). Incandescent lava was hurled ~40 m high.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Craig Chesner (Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, Illinois, USA), Sid Halsor, Wilkes Barre University


4 January-10 January 2006

During 4-9 January, moderate-to-strong explosions at Fuego produced ash plumes that rose to ~1 km above the volcano (or 15,600 ft a.s.l.). The explosions were accompanied by rumbling sounds and acoustic waves that shook windows and doors in villages near the volcano. Avalanches of volcanic material traveled down the volcano's SW flank.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


28 December-3 January 2006

An eruption began at Fuego on 27 December around 0545 and produced lava flows that traveled down Taniluya (SW) and Seca (W) ravines, initially extending ~800 m and 1,200 m, respectively. At 0602 a pyroclastic flow descended Seca Ravine, producing a S-drifting column of ash that rose to a height of ~2 km above the volcano (or 18,900 ft a.s.l.). Ash fell to the S of the volcano in the port of San Jose. Later that day, the lava flows reached lengths of 1.2 and 1.3 km, and pyroclastic flows traveled 1.8 and 2 km down the Taniluya and Seca ravines, respectively. Lava flows also traveled W toward Santa Teresa ravine, and SE towards Jute and Lajas ravines. A small amount of ash fell W and SW of the volcano in the villages of Panimaché (~7 km SSW), Morelia, Santa Sofía, and Los Tarros.

Volcanic activity continued through 28 December, with incandescent lava clots hurled ~75 m high, lava flows traveling down the volcano's flanks, and a dark gas-and-ash plume rising to ~1 km above the volcano (or 15,600 ft a.s.l.). Avalanches of volcanic material spalled from lava-flow fronts. On the 29th, lava only flowed in Santa Teresa ravine, reaching ~600 m. Moderate explosions continued through 3 January, depositing small amounts of ash in Panimaché village. According to a news article, none of the ~250,000 residents from the 78 communities near the volcano were evacuated.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Reuters


21 December-27 December 2005

On 27 December an eruption at Fuego produced an ash plume to a height of ~7.6 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. that extended SSW and SSE of the volcano. The higher level ash (~7.6 km a.s.l.) drifted W to Honduras, while ash below ~6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. drifted E to the Pacific coast. According to news articles, two lava flows that were both ~2 km long traveled down the volcano's flanks, but posed no threat to inhabited areas. Articles also reported that about 25,000 local residents were put on alert, and emergency teams said that there was no immediate need for evacuations.

Sources: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Reuters


14 December-20 December 2005

On 13 December, two lava flows from Fuego reached 200-300 m W and SW of the central crater. Small landslides of incandescent blocks spalled off of the lava flows.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


16 November-22 November 2005

During 17-21 November, lava flows from Fuego continued to travel towards the Ceniza (to the S), Taniluyá (to the S), and Santa Teresa (to the W) ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


9 November-15 November 2005

During 11-14 November, three lava flows were emitted from Fuego. On the 14th, two of the lava flows traveled from the S edge of the central crater 150 m toward the Ceniza ravine, and 400 m toward the Taniluyá ravine, and the third traveled 600 m W toward the Santa Teresa ravine. Avalanches of volcanic material spalled from the fronts of the lava flows.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


2 November-8 November 2005

During 2-7 November, several weak explosions occurred at Fuego, producing ash plumes that rose to low levels. Lava flows traveled down the volcano's S and SW flanks, extending 600 m towards the Taniluya ravine, and 300 m towards the Cenizas ravine. Avalanches of incandescent material occurred from the lava-flow fronts.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


7 September-13 September 2005

A small eruption at Fuego on 17 July during 1715-1945 produced an ash plume that rose 3.5-4 km above the volcano's crater (or 23,800-25,500 ft a.s.l.). The eruption was accompanied by small pyroclastic flows that traveled SW down Santa Teresa and Taniluyá ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


13 July-19 July 2005

A small eruption at Fuego on 17 July during 1715-1945 produced an ash plume to a height of 3.5-4 km above the volcano's crater (23,800-25,500 ft a.s.l.). The eruption was accompanied by small pyroclastic flows that traveled down Santa Teresa and Taniluyá ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


6 July-12 July 2005

During 6-11 July, several explosions at Fuego produced low-level plumes. Small avalanches of volcanic material traveled down the S and W sides of the central crater, and from the front of a lava flow.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


22 June-28 June 2005

From 22-24 June, small incandescent lava expulsions reached ~50 m high and columns of grayish smoke rose ~300 m above the vent (13,300 ft a.s.l.) and drifted W. Weak rumbling and short avalanches of incandescent material accompanied these expulsions. On 27 June a lava flow was observed on the South flank extending approximately 300 m.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


1 June-7 June 2005

During 1-6 June, several explosions at Fuego produced low-level plumes. Small avalanches of volcanic material occurred on the S and W sides of the central crater. A lava flow, which began on 18 May on the volcano's W flank, extended ~1 km down the volcano's flank. On 2 June, a new lava flow was emitted that traveled ~120 m down Fuego's S flank.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


18 May-24 May 2005

During 17-20 May, lava flows continued to travel down Fuego's flanks, extending ~400 m W and ~500 m SW of the summit. Short avalanches originated from the lava-flow fronts. Also, explosions sent ash and incandescent volcanic material to low altitudes.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


11 May-17 May 2005

Small white plumes to ~200 m height were again observed during 11-17 May. Lava flows down the Santa Teresa and Taniluya ravines reached 700 and 500 m long, respectively, with avalanches originating from their fronts.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


4 May-10 May 2005

A lava flow on 9 May extended ~100 m towards the S flank during almost 4 hours of emission. Small plumes 200-300 m high that same day were associated with 29 episodes of weak rumbling noises.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


20 April-26 April 2005

During 21-25 April, explosions at Fuego generated small lava avalanches to the W and SW. Also, lava flows traveled ~400 m W and ~250 m SW. Blocks of lava spalled from the front of the lava flows.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


2 March-8 March 2005

During 2-8 March, several explosions at Fuego produced plumes to a maximum height of 1 km above the volcano. Some explosions were accompanied by avalanches of volcanic material that traveled towards the Taniluyá (to the SW) and Santa Teresa ravines. Around 4 March, a lava flow traveled ~200 m down Fuego's SW flank. Blocks of lava spalled from the front of the lava flow.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


19 January-25 January 2005

During 24-25 January, several weak-to-moderate explosions at Fuego produced ash plumes to a maximum height of 1.5 km above the volcano. The eruptions were accompanied by avalanches of incandescent volcanic blocks towards several ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


22 December-28 December 2004

On 22 December a narrow lava flow on Fuego's S flank reached a distance of ~200 m from the central crater. Many small block-lava avalanches traveled SW towards the Taniluyá River. The Washington VAAC reported that steam-and-ash emissions on 23 December rose to ~4.5 km a.s.l.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


15 December-21 December 2004

During 15-21 December, several small incandescent avalanches of volcanic material at Fuego traveled mainly SW toward the Taniluyá ravine. Around 20 December a narrow lava flow began to be emitted from the S edge of the volcano's central crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


8 December-14 December 2004

Several small explosions occurred at Fuego during 8-14 December, producing plumes that rose to ~600 m above the volcano. During the report period, small avalanches of volcanic blocks traveled towards Taniluyá, Ceniza, and Santa Teresa ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


1 December-7 December 2004

There were several small explosions at Fuego during 1-7 December. During the report period, small avalanches of volcanic blocks traveled in the direction of Taniluyá and Santa Teresa ravines. On the evening of 2 December, a thin lava flow traveled about 100 m SSW of the central crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


24 November-30 November 2004

During 24-26 November there were several explosions at Fuego. On 25 and 26 November ash plumes from these explosions rose to low levels above the volcano. Incandescent lava was hurled ~100 m above the volcano and avalanches of block lava traveled towards the Taniluyá and Ceniza ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


17 November-23 November 2004

During the report period, avalanches of incandescent volcanic material continued towards the Lajas and Taniluyá ravines on the volcano's SE and SW flanks. Small and moderate explosions expelled abundant incandescent lava to heights ~150 m above the crater. Some explosions generated rumblings, shock waves, and fine ash that was deposited on the skirts of the volcano. Near the end of the report period, the energy level of the eruption lowered, especially the flow of lava towards the Lajas ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


10 November-16 November 2004

During 10-15 November, avalanches of incandescent volcanic material continued towards the major ravines on the volcano's flanks. Avalanches occurred from the fronts of the lava flows. Sounds like that of a locomotive or airplane turbine were heard emanating from the active crater. Small explosions expelled incandescent lava to heights of 75-100 m above the crater. Steam plumes from fumarolic activity reach heights of ~500-600 m above the crater, extending ~4-7 km to the S and SW.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


3 November-9 November 2004

During 3-5 November, avalanches of incandescent volcanic material traveled 600-800 m towards the Taniluyá and Ceniza ravines on the volcano's flanks. The avalanches originated from two areas about 20 m below the S edge of Fuego's crater. A few explosions produced low-level plumes. During an eruptive pulse beginning around 0026 on 7 November two lava flows were emitted. Avalanches occurred from the fronts of the lava flows. A ~30-m-high scoria cone was formed in the SW part of the central crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


27 October-2 November 2004

During 28-29 October, several weak explosions at Fuego sent plumes to a maximum height of 300 m above the volcano and volcanic bombs were sometimes thrown ~75 m above the volcano's crater. In addition, avalanches of incandescent volcanic material traveled ~600 m towards the ravine of the Ceniza River.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


20 October-26 October 2004

During 21-22 October, several weak explosions at Fuego sent plumes to a maximum height of ~300 m above the volcano. In addition, avalanches of incandescent volcanic material traveled towards the ravines of Taniluyá and Ceniza on the volcano's flanks. The avalanches originated from two areas about 20 m below the S edge of Fuego's crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


13 October-19 October 2004

During 14-18 October, several weak explosions at Fuego sent plumes to a maximum height of 800 m above the volcano and volcanic bombs were sometimes thrown 75-100 m above the volcano's crater. In addition, avalanches of incandescent volcanic material traveled towards the ravines of Taniluyá, Ceniza, and Trinidad on the volcano's flanks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


6 October-12 October 2004

During the evening of 9 October, a narrow lava flow traveled ~800 m down Fuego's SSW flank towards the head of the Taniluyá River. A small sustained lava fountain reached ~75 m above the volcano during the evening of 10 October. On 12 October, a narrow lava flow traveled ~400 m from an area about 20 m below the S edge of the crater. Small avalanches occurred from the lava-flow fronts. Six explosions produced plumes to ~600 m above the volcano's summit. A small lahar traveled towards the Zanjón Barranca Seca Ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


29 September-5 October 2004

During 30 September to 4 October several explosions occurred at Fuego, producing ash plumes to a maximum height of 2 km above the volcano. On 30 September, lava avalanches traveled towards Santa Teresa and Taniluya ravines. On 1 October, incandescent lava bombs were hurled ~100 m above the volcano.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


22 September-28 September 2004

Weak explosions at Fuego on 21 September produced white plumes to ~200 m above the volcano. During 25-26 September, several moderate explosions emitted incandescent lava bombs to heights of ~150 m and plumes to 600-900 m above the volcano. The explosions were accompanied by avalanches of volcanic material that traveled W to the head of Santa Teresa Ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


15 September-21 September 2004

Ten explosions on 16 September sent ash columns ~400-600 m high; three ejected incandescent lava and caused block avalanches. White fumarolic plumes typically rose 300-500 m. Similar activity was observed through the 20th. Overnight on 19-20 September weak incandescence was seen from the crater. The highest plume during this period rose ~900 m.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


8 September-14 September 2004

During 8-13 September, small explosions at Fuego produced low-level plumes and avalanches of volcanic blocks traveled down the volcano's flanks. On 12 September a small lahar occurred down the volcano's flank.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


1 September-7 September 2004

During 2-3 September, small explosions at Fuego produced low-level plumes and avalanches of volcanic blocks traveled down the volcano's flanks. On 4 September a small lahar flowed down the volcano's S flank, partially blocking a road.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


25 August-31 August 2004

During 30 August to 1 September, several small explosions at Fuego produced plumes to low levels.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


18 August-24 August 2004

During 18-23 August, many weak-to-moderate explosions occurred at Fuego. The explosions expelled lava blocks to ~100 m above the crater and plumes rose to a maximum height of 0.5 km above the crater. Avalanches of incandescent volcanic material traveled to the mouths of several ravines on the volcano's flanks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


11 August-17 August 2004

During 11-16 August, dozens of weak-to-moderate explosions occurred at Fuego. The explosions expelled lava blocks to ~75 m above the crater and plumes rose to a maximum height of 1.2 km above the crater. Avalanches of incandescent volcanic material traveled to the mouths of several ravines on the volcano's flanks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


21 July-27 July 2004

A series of strong explosions at Fuego on 21 July during 0630-0950 produced ash plumes to a height of ~2 km above the volcano. Plumes traveled W, SW, and S, depositing ash in several villages near the volcano. Small incandescent avalanches of volcanic material traveled to the mouths of several ravines. Ash emissions and avalanches continued through 27 July.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


14 July-20 July 2004

During 14-19 July, explosions at Fuego produced plumes to a maximum height of ~1.5 km a.s.l. and avalanches of volcanic material traveled down several ravines flanking the volcano.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


7 July-13 July 2004

On 7 July, an explosion from Fuego generated an avalanche of lava fragments near the headwaters of Santa Teresa ravine. Forty-three weak to moderate explosions were observed during 10-11 July; the explosions produced ashy plumes less than 2 km above the ground that were blown west-southwest at least 20 km from the volcano.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


30 June-6 July 2004

During 1-6 July, small explosions at Fuego produced plumes to ~1.4 km above the volcano that predominately drifted SW. Occasional avalanches of volcanic material traveled down ravines flanking the volcano.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


23 June-29 June 2004

On 28 and 29 June, small explosions at Fuego produced plumes to ~0.8 km above the volcano that predominately drifted SW. Incandescence was visible in the crater at night.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


2 June-8 June 2004

On 1 June, five moderately strong explosions occurred at Fuego with gas-and-ash plumes rising up to 2 km above the summit. Incandescent avalanches of material from these explosions occurred in the Santa Teresa and Río Taniluyá ravines. This pulse of activity was preceded by half an hour and followed by two hours of explosions producing steam plumes rising up to ~0.5 km above the summit. On 6 June, frequent small explosions produced gas plumes that rose to ~0.5 km above the summit and less frequent explosions produced gas-and-ash plumes that rose to ~1.0 km above the summit. Incandescent avalanches from these explosions occurred in the Santa Teresa and Ceniza ravines. A hot lahar, followed 45 minutes later by a smaller lahar, occurred in the Zanjón Barranca Seca ravine on 6 June. Moderate explosions continued on 7 June, producing small gas-and-ash plumes to ~0.5 km above the summit.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


26 May-1 June 2004

During 31 May to 1 June moderate volcanic and seismic activity continued at Fuego, with several explosions producing ash plumes. The highest rising plume reached ~1.5 km above the volcano on 31 May. This explosion also produced avalanches of volcanic material down the ravines of Taniluyá and Santa Teresa.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


19 May-25 May 2004

During 18-21 May, moderate volcanic activity continued at Fuego. Several explosions produced ash plumes, with the highest one reaching ~1.2 km above the volcano on 20 May. On 21 May, avalanches of incandescent volcanic material traveled toward the ravines of Seca (to the W) and Taniluya (to the SW).

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


12 May-18 May 2004

During 10-17 May, moderate volcanic activity continued at Fuego. Several explosions produced ash plumes, with the highest one reaching ~1.8 km above the volcano on 13 May. Explosions on 13 May at 0411 and 0618 emitted incandescent volcanic material ~150 m. In addition, a lahar traveled W toward Seca Ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


5 May-11 May 2004

During 5-7 May, explosions at Fuego produced gas-and-ash clouds. On 5 May a small lahar travel W down Seca Ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


28 April-4 May 2004

During 28 April to 4 May, explosions at Fuego produced gas-and-ash clouds. On 28 April, an explosion produced an ash plume to ~1.5 km above the volcano, and ash was deposited ~4 km SW of the volcano in the villages of Panimaché I and Panimaché II. In addition, a small avalanche of volcanic material traveled W toward Santa Teresa Ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


21 April-27 April 2004

During 22-27 April, weak explosions at Fuego produced gas-and-steam clouds to ~1 km above the volcano. In addition, small avalanches of volcanic material occasionally traveled W toward Santa Teresa Ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


14 April-20 April 2004

On 16 April, a 5.5-km-wide gas-and-ash plume from Fuego rose to ~6 km a.s.l. and was dispersed to the S. During 18-19 April, small eruptions hurled incandescent material up to 50 m above the vent.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 April-13 April 2004

On 12 April weak-to-moderate explosions at Fuego produced plumes to 0.3-1 km above the volcano. Lava flowed 75-100 m from the central crater and avalanches of volcanic material traveled as far as 400 m towards Santa Teresa and Taniluyá ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


31 March-6 April 2004

During 31 March to 6 April, weak-to-moderate explosions continued at Fuego. The highest rising ash plume produced from the explosions reached ~1.2 km above the volcano on 5 April and drifted SSE. Lahars flowed down Seca Ravine on 30 March, and near the village of Sangre de Cristo on 3 April. During the report period, incandescent avalanches of volcanic material traveled down several ravines, including Santa Teresa, Ceniza, and Taniluyá.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


24 March-30 March 2004

During 24-30 March, sporadic weak explosions and three strong explosions were recorded at Fuego. On 26 March a strong explosion produced an ash plume that reached ~1 km above the vent and caused incandescent avalanches in the Zanjón Barranca Seca and Trinidad ravines. On 29 March two explosions within 7 minutes produced gas-and-ash plumes that reached heights of ~1 km above the vent. A lahar occurred on 29 March in the Zanjón Barranca Seca ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


17 March-23 March 2004

During 16-23 March moderate-to-strong explosions continued at Fuego, producing ash plumes to a maximum height of 1.3 km above the volcano. On 16 March ash fell in the village of Morelia. Explosions during 17-19 March produced incandescent avalanches of volcanic material that traveled down the Seca Ravine. During the report period, ash fell in the village of Sangre de Cristo.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


10 March-16 March 2004

During 9-15 March, moderate-to-strong explosions continued at Fuego, producing ash plumes to a maximum height of 1.7 km above the volcano. Incandescent avalanches of volcanic material traveled as far as 600 m down ravines on the volcano's W, SW, and S flanks and ash fell in villages from Sangre de Cristo to Panimaché.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


3 March-9 March 2004

During 4-8 March, moderate-to-strong explosions at Fuego produced plumes to ~1.5 km above the volcano. On 5, 7, and 8 March avalanches of incandescent volcanic material traveled as far as 1.5 km down several ravines, including Seca, Taniluyá, Ceniza, and Trinidad. Explosions on the 7th and 8th deposited ash 6-10 km from the volcano, including in the villages of Sangre de Cristo and Panimaché.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


25 February-2 March 2004

During 25 February to 2 March weak-to-moderate explosions continued at Fuego, producing plumes to ~1.7 km above the crater. Avalanches of volcanic material traveled down several ravines, including Trinidad, Ceniza, Santa Teresa, and Taniluyá (to the W). Explosions on 28 February deposited small amounts of fine ash in the village of Sangre de Cristo, and explosions on 29 February deposited ash W and SW of the volcano in the villages of Yepocapa and La Cruz.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 February-24 February 2004

During 18-19 February, several moderate-to-strong explosions at Fuego produced ash plumes to 0.8-1.5 km above the crater. The explosions also produced landslides of incandescent volcanic material that traveled down several ravines: Seca (to the SW), Taniluyá (to the W), Trinidad, Ceniza, and sometimes towards Las Lajas-El Jute. Small amounts of fine ash were deposited to the W in the village of Sangre de Cristo. On 22 and 23 February explosions continued, sending plumes to 1.8 km above the crater. Ash fell in the communities of La Rochela, Ceilán, El Zapote, and Guadalupe.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Siglo XXI News, Prensa Libre


11 February-17 February 2004

INSIVUMEH reported that during 11-16 February several moderate-to-strong explosions occurred at Fuego, producing gas-and-ash plumes to 1.6 km above the crater. Incandescent avalanches traveled a maximum distance of 1 km down several ravines, including Trinidad and Taniluyá to the SW, Seca to the W, Ceniza, and Lajas. During 11-12 February, ash fell in the villages of Panimaché and Sangre de Cristo. According to the Washington VAAC, on 14 February ash was visible on satellite imagery at a height of ~3.5 km above the volcano.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 February-10 February 2004

Explosions at Fuego on 8 February produced incandescent avalanches that traveled toward the Seca (to the W), Trinidad, and Taniluyá (to the SW) ravines. Several moderate-to-strong explosions on 9 February produced ash-and-gas plumes that rose to heights of 800-1,500 m above the volcano and drifted W and S. Ash fell as far as 15 km from the volcano, including in the town of Sangre de Cristo and in several ranches (locally termed fincas) in the area. According to the Washington VAAC, on 9 and 10 February small ash plumes were visible on satellite imagery.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


28 January-3 February 2004

During 28 January to 2 February, small-to-moderate explosions occurred at Fuego. The highest rising ash plume was produced from an explosion on 29 January. The plume reached ~1.1 km above the crater and was accompanied by avalanches of volcanic material down Barranca Seca. A small amount of ash fell in Panimaché village and possibly in Santa Sofía. On 31 January two small collapses in the S edge of the central crater produced small avalanches of lava blocks.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


21 January-27 January 2004

On the evening of 22 January two strong explosions at Fuego sent incandescent avalanches a maximum distance of 1 km toward Zanjón Barranca Seca, La Trinidad, and Río Ceniza ravines. The resultant plume rose ~1.5 km above the crater and drifted SSW. No ash fell in populated regions. During the rest of 21-27 January, weak-to-moderate explosions occurred, sending plumes to ~700 m above the crater.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


7 January-13 January 2004

An ash emission from Fuego on 8 January around 1500 rose to ~3 km above the volcano. According to news reports, 25-30 explosions occurred per minute and were accompanied by loud rumbling noises. No evacuations were ordered. Plumes and a relatively strong hotspot were visible on satellite imagery.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Prensa Libre, Associated Press


31 December-6 January 2004

During 1-5 January, lava emitted from Fuego flowed 70-100 m from the crater. Avalanches from the lava-flow fronts traveled W toward Santa Teresa ravine and toward Trinidad ravine. Seismic stations on the volcano recorded almost continuous harmonic tremor with moderate frequency and amplitude.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


24 December-30 December 2003

On 30 December, small-to-moderate explosions produced plumes containing little ash that rose to low levels above Fuego. Ash from the explosions was deposited around the volcano's edifice. Small avalanches of volcanic material traveled W toward Santa Teresa ravine and toward Trinidad ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


17 December-23 December 2003

During 18-22 December, moderate explosions at Fuego produced low-level ash plumes that drifted SE and W. Avalanches of volcanic material traveled down the volcano's W and SW flanks toward Taniluya and Santa Teresa ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


10 December-16 December 2003

During 10-16 December, weak explosions at Fuego continued to produce ash clouds that rose 200-1,000 m above the volcano. Explosions and avalanches on 16 December sent volcanic material W and SW towards Taniluya and Santa Teresa ravines. Civil Aeronautics recommended that airplanes avoid the area near the volcano due to ash in the atmosphere.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


3 December-9 December 2003

During 7-9 December, moderate to strong explosions at Fuego expelled ash up to 0.5 km above the crater. The ash was distributed to the N. Incandescent avalanches were observed in the Santa Teresa and Taniluyá ravines.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


26 November-2 December 2003

During 28 November to 1 December, moderate-to-weak explosions at Fuego produced gas-and-ash plumes to heights of 700-900 m above the volcano. The explosions were accompanied by avalanches of volcanic material that traveled towards Teresa, Taniluyá, and Trinidad ravines. On the evening of 1 December, incandescence was seen in the ravines and in the active central crater. During the report period, continuous harmonic tremor was recorded.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


19 November-25 November 2003

Small explosive eruptions at Fuego produced gas-and-ash plumes up to 1.2 km above the crater. During the night of 18-19 November moderate-sized avalanches were observed in the upper Santa Teresa and Trinidad ravines. Night-time incandescence at the summit was common during the week. Periods of harmonic tremor, lasting between 0.5-3 hours, were recorded on 23 November, and almost continuous harmonic tremor was recorded for a period of 21 hours on 24 November.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


5 November-11 November 2003

On the night of 4 November observers saw crater glow and incandescent avalanches. Some incandescent avalanches descended into local valleys. Earlier that day moderate exposions prevailed, throwing material 150 m above the crater's rim. The explosions generated shock waves audible at distance.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


15 October-21 October 2003

A 33-minute-long explosive eruption began at Fuego on 17 October at 0007, producing a gas-and-ash plume to ~1.5 km above the crater. This eruption was preceded and followed by small explosions and seismicity. During one of these earthquakes a small incandescent avalanche descended the Santa Teresa ravine.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


8 October-14 October 2003

On 9 October a pilot saw ash emitted from Fuego that reached a height of ~4.6 a.s.l. No ash was visible on satellite imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 September-30 September 2003

Ash plumes emitted from Fuego were visible on satellite imagery on 28 September. The first emission occurred around 0500 and produced an ash plume that covered an area of 5 x 5 km and drifted S. It was no longer visible by 0800. A second ash emission between 0815 and 0832 rose to ~ 6 km a.s.l. Ash was no longer visible on satellite imagery by 1445.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


9 July-15 July 2003

INSIVUMEH reported to the Washington VAAC that on 9 July at 0530 Fuego's lava dome collapsed, producing pyroclastic flows. After the collapse, strong explosions sent ash to ~2 km above the volcano's summit. Ash clouds drifted W and ash fell in communities W and SE of the summit. An ash cloud was visible on satellite imagery.

Sources: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Prensa Libre


2 July-8 July 2003

INSIVUMEH reported that the eruption at Fuego on 29 June during 1745-2200 consisted mainly of lava flows and avalanches of volcanic material traveling down the volcano's E flank. Incandescence was visible from the city of Antigua and the S coast. Ash fell in villages W and SE of the volcano, including San Pedro Yepocapa. Explosions and tremor were recorded by a seismic station. After the eruption, weak-to-moderate explosions at Fuego produced ash clouds to ~900 m above the volcano and seismographs mainly recorded tremor. Pyroclastic-flow material extended ~1.5 km down the volcano's W flank. Fuego was at Alert Level Yellow and pilots were advised to avoid flying near the volcano.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


25 June-1 July 2003

Based on information from INSIVUMEH, the Washington VAAC reported that a moderate eruption began at Fuego on 29 June at 1700. Lava flows were seen, and ash fell S and SW of the volcano. As of 30 June lava flows were still visible, an ash plume was W of the summit, and seismicity was at low levels. Both days a hot spot was visible on satellite imagery, but an ash cloud could not be distinguished from abundant meteorological clouds in the area.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


30 April-6 May 2003

At the end of April U.S. Air Force meteorologists used GOES-12 imagery to describe a thin plume of Fuego's ash that rose to ~7 km a.s.l. and blew SW at 20-30 km/hour. The ash plume was visible for over an hour. On 2 May the Washington VAAC reported that Fuego discharged small eruptions, with most ash remaining near the summit and little if any ash clearly visible on satellite imagery.

Sources: US Air Force Weather Agency, Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 April-29 April 2003

The Washington VAAC reported that on 28 April Fuego produced intermittent ash eruptions. One cloud was observed at ~ 7 km a.s.l., traveling SW at 19-29 km per hour. Although remote sensing was complicated by poor visibility due to high cirrus clouds and smoke from fires, some eruptive puffs remained recognizable when they blew over the coast.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


15 January-21 January 2003

INSIVUMEH reported that as of 19 January moderate eruptions continued at Fuego that produced ash clouds to 2 km above the summit. Ash drifted to the S and SW, depositing fine ash in the areas of Rocela, Panimache, and Palo Verde. In addition, incandescent avalanches traveled down canyons on the volcano's flanks.

Sources: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


8 January-14 January 2003

The Washington VAAC reported that an eruption began at Fuego on 8 January around 0500. According to INSIVUMEH, as of 1100 that day the eruption continued with ash explosions and lava flow emission. A steam-and-ash column rose 5.7 km a.s.l. and drifted to the W. In addition, two small-to-moderate pyroclastic flows traveled down the drainage of the Santa Teresa River Valley. CONRED stated that the Alert Level was raised to Orange and several people were evacuated from the town of Sangre de Cristo. According to a news report volcanism decreased the following day, so the Alert Level was lowered from Orange to Yellow.

Sources: Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED), Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), EFE News Service, Prensa Libre


24 December-30 December 2002

An explosive eruption and partial crater collapse occurred at Fuego on 26 December around 0905. An ash cloud was generated that reached ~2 km above the volcano and drifted W toward the Yepocapa region. Neither damage nor injuries were reported.

Sources: EFE News Service, Prensa Libre, Siglo XXI News


14 August-20 August 2002

A new cycle of eruptive activity began at Fuego on 16 July that consisted of an increase in Strombolian explosions and the occurrence of high-frequency volcanic tremor for 24 hours. On 28 July a thick gray ash cloud extended 10-15 km in length and drifted to the W. Ash was deposited in the areas of Rochela, Panimaché, Morelia, Santa Sofía, Yepocàpa, and Chimaltenango. This activity was associated with the collapse of the front of a lava flow, which began on 23 January. On 29 July an increase in seismic activity was recorded, the energy of explosions in the crater increased, and there was a 2- to 3-km-long lava flow. On 2 August explosions changed from Strombolian to Vulcanian, ash columns rose 800-1,400 m above the crater, and avalanches of volcanic blocks traveled down the volcano's flanks. The same day, gas emission from the crater decreased significantly, and the SE lava flow did not travel as quickly as it had previously.

Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)


13 February-19 February 2002

Volcanism increased at Fuego on 12 February, with a ~2-km-long lava flow streaming down its flank towards an unpopulated area. Several shelters have been set up in case lava flows travel towards populated areas or volcanism increases. The volcano remained at Alert Level Yellow.

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)


30 January-5 February 2002

Based on information from INSIVUMEH, the Washington VAAC reported that on 1 February at 0930 ash, steam, and lava were emitted from Fuego. An ash-and-steam cloud rose to ~4.5 km a.s.l. and drifted to the SW. No ash was seen on satellite imagery, but a hotspot was visible on infrared imagery.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 January-29 January 2002

Observations in late January revealed that Fuego was erupting a lava flow down its E flank. The flow stretched several hundred meters below the summit before falling apart on steep slopes. The toe of the flow calved off about once a minute, but the volume of material was not sufficient to generate pyroclastic flows. No explosive activity was observed and only low-level tremor was recorded. Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED) and INSIVUMEH are monitoring the situation at the volcano.

Source: US Geological Survey


9 January-15 January 2002

An eruption began at Fuego on 4 January during 0200-0300. A probable explosion was followed by Strombolian-type ejections and continuous tremor. No lava flows were visible. Until at least 9 January intermittent mild-to-moderate explosions produced ash clouds that rose 400-600 m above the cone.

Source: US Geological Survey


6 December-12 December 2000

The Washington VAAC reported that a small eruption at approximately 1645 on 9 December sent ash to ~ 4 km a.s.l. (near-summit level). The small ash cloud drifted to the W and NW, was initially dense, and rapidly dissipated so that it was no longer visible on satellite imagery by 2345. Throughout the day, occasional strong hot spots were visible on GOES-8 multi-spectral imagery. According to the Washington VAAC, on the evening of 9 December a volcanologist with INSIVUMEH in Guatemala stated that Fuego had shown increased instability with several explosions. The last reported eruption of Fuego sent ash to ~4 km a.s.l on 29 August 2000.

Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2002 Jan 4 2013 Jul 9 (continuing) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1999 May 21 2000 Dec 9 (in or after) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1987 Jan 5 ± 4 days 1987 Feb (?) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1977 Sep 11 1979 Aug 8 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1977 Mar 3 1977 Apr 19 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1975 May 28 1975 Oct 21 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1974 Oct 10 1974 Dec 4 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
1973 Feb 23 1973 Mar 23 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1971 Sep 14 1971 Sep 15 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1967 Apr 22 1967 Apr 24 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1966 Aug 12 1966 Aug 13 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1966 Feb 7 1966 May 1 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1963 Sep 28 1963 Sep 30 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1962 Aug 4 1962 Nov 9 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1957 Feb 19 1957 Feb 21 (in or after) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1955 Jul 26 ± 5 days Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1953 Apr 9 1953 Apr 13 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1949 Nov Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1947 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1944 Dec 1 ± 30 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1932 Jan 21 1932 Jan 22 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
1896 Jan 10 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1880 Jun 28 1880 Aug 20 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
[ 1867 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1861 Nov 21 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1860 Aug 18 1860 Sep 23 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1857 Sep 17 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1857 Jan 15 1857 Feb 17 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
1856 Sep 29 1856 Sep 30 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1856 Jan 9 1856 Mar 7 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1855 Sep 29 1855 Sep 30 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1852 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1850 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1829 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1826 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1799 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
[ 1773 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1765 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1751 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1737 Aug 27 1737 Sep 24 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
1732 May Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1730 Sep Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1717 Aug 27 1717 Dec 26 ± 5 days Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
1710 Oct 14 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1709 Oct 14 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1706 Oct 4 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1705 Jan 31 1705 Feb 2 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1702 Aug 4 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1699 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1689 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1686 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1685 Sep Unknown Confirmed 2 Unknown
[ 1679 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1629 1632 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1623 Jan Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1620 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1617 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1614 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1587 Jul 24 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1586 Jun 3 ± 2 days 1586 Dec Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1585 Jan 15 1585 Jul Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1581 Dec 5 1582 Jan 15 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
[ 1577 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1576 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1575 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1571 Dec 25 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1565 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1559 Jan 16 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1557 Jan 15 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1551 1552 Mar 31 (in or after) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1542 Jan 14 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
1541 Unknown Confirmed   Unknown
1531 Dec 31 ± 30 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1526 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1524 Apr 30 ± 30 days 1524 Jul 15 ± 45 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
0970 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0900 ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0590 ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
1580 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Carr M J, 1984. Symmetrical and segmented variation of physical and geochemical characterisitics of the Central American volcanic front. J Volc Geotherm Res, 20: 231-252.

Chesner C A, Halsor S, 1997. Geochemical trends of sequential lava flows from Meseta Volcano, Guatemala. J Volc Geotherm Res, 78: 221-237.

Chesner C A, Halsor S P, 2006. The Escuintla and La Democracia debris avalanche deposits, Guatemala: constraining their sources. In: Rose W I, Bluth G J S, Carr M J, Ewert J W, Patino L C, Vallance J W (eds), Volcanic hazards in Central America, {Geol Soc Amer Spec Pap}, 412: 105-120.

Chesner C A, Rose W I, 1984. Geochemistry and evolution of the Fuego volcanic complex, Guatemala. J Volc Geotherm Res, 21: 25-44.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Lyons J J, Waite G P, Rose W I, Chigna G, 2010. Patterns in open vent, strombolian behavior at Fuego volcano, Guatemala, 2005-2007. Bull Volc, 72: 1-15.

Martin D P, Rose W I, 1981. Behavioral patterns of Fuego volcano, Guatemala. J Volc Geotherm Res, 10: 67-81.

Mooser F, Meyer-Abich H, McBirney A R, 1958. Central America. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 6: 1-146.

Rodriquez L A, Watson M W, Rose W I, Branan Y K, Bluth G J S, Chigna G, Matias O, Escobar D, Carn S A, Fischer T P, 2004. SO2 emissions to the atmosphere from active volcanoes in Guatemala and El Salvador, 1999-2002. J Volc Geotherm Res, 138: 325-344.

Rose W I, Self S, Murrow P J, Bonadonna C, Durant A J, Ernst G G J, 2008. Nature and significance of small volume fall deposits at composite volcanoes: insights from the October 14, 1974 Fuego eruption, Guatemala. Bull Volc, 70: 1043-1067.

Sapper K, 1925. The Volcanoes of Central America. Halle: Verlag Max Niemeyer, 144 p.

Siebert L, Alvarado G E, Vallance J W, van Wyk de Vries B, 2006. Large-volume volcanic edifice failures in Central America and associated hazards. In: Rose W I, Bluth G J S, Carr M J, Ewert J W, Patino L C, Vallance J W (eds), Volcanic hazards in Central America, {Geol Soc Amer Spec Pap}, 412: 1-26.

Vallance J W, Schilling S P, Matias O, Rose W I, Howell M M, 2001. Volcano hazards at Fuego and Agua, Guatemala. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 01-431: 1-23.

Vallance J W, Siebert L, Rose W I, Giron J R, Banks N G, 1995. Edifice collapse and related hazards in Guatemala. J Volc Geotherm Res, 66: 337-355.

Yuan A, McNutt S R, Harlow D H, 1984. Seismicity and eruptive activity at Fuego Volcano, Guatemala; February 1975 - January 1977. J Volc Geotherm Res, 21: 277-296.

Volcán Fuego, one of Central America's most active volcanoes, is one of three large stratovolcanoes overlooking Guatemala's former capital, Antigua. The scarp of an older edifice, Meseta, lies between 3763-m-high Fuego and its twin volcano to the north, Acatenango. Construction of Meseta volcano dates back to about 230,000 years and continued until the late Pleistocene or early Holocene. Collapse of Meseta volcano may have produced the massive Escuintla debris-avalanche deposit, which extends about 50 km onto the Pacific coastal plain. Growth of the modern Fuego volcano followed, continuing the southward migration of volcanism that began at Acatenango. In contrast to the mostly andesitic Acatenango volcano, eruptions at Fuego have become more mafic with time, and most historical activity has produced basaltic rocks. Frequent vigorous historical eruptions have been recorded at Fuego since the onset of the Spanish era in 1524, and have produced major ashfalls, along with occasional pyroclastic flows and lava flows.