Antipodes Island

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 49.68°S
  • 178.77°E

  • 402 m
    1319 ft

  • 335010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Antipodes Island.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Antipodes Island.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Antipodes Island. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Cullen D J, 1969. Quaternary volcanism at the Antipodes Islands: its bearing on structural interpretation of the southwest Pacific. J Geophys Res, 74: 4213-4220.

LeMasurier W E, Thomson J W (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. Washington, D C: Amer Geophys Union, 487 p.

Warham J, Johns P M, 1975. The University of Canterbury Antipodes Island Expedition 1969. J Roy Soc New Zeal, 5: 103-131.

The isolated, uninhabited Antipodes Islands are located in the south Pacific, 770 km SE of New Zealand. Volcanism has been dominantly pyroclastic, and the presence of well-preserved scoria cones suggests a Holocene age (LeMasurier and Thomson, 1990). The most recent eruptions occurred on the cone forming Mount Galloway and Mount Waterhouse at the center of 4-km-wide Antipodes Island. Marine erosion has exposed sections through tuff cones at Perpendicular Head and Albatross Point at the NE and SE tips of the island, respectively. Radiometric dates indicated basalts that are younger than 1 million years, and Mullen (1969) also noted that volcanism may have continued until Recent times.