Southern EPR-Segment I

Photo of this volcano
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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 18.53°S
  • 113.42°W

  • -2600 m
    -8528 ft

  • 334140
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Southern EPR-Segment I.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Southern EPR-Segment I.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Southern EPR-Segment I.

The narrow axial crest of Segment I of the Southern East Pacific Rise in some places is less than 50 m wide. An axial dome is located along the southern part of the segment. The largest lava flow field in this EPR segment is the Animal Farm flow, named after a thriving low-temperature hydrothermal site discovered during a submersible expedition in 1993. The Animal Farm lava flow was dated by magnetic paleointensity measurements at about 1880-1950 AD, and older flows were dated by similar techniques to the 17th and 19th centuries.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1915 ± 40 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Magnetism Animal Farm lava flow
1860 (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Magnetism Southern South Hump lava flow
1620 (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Magnetism Northern South Hump lava flow

The Global Volcanism Program has no synonyms or subfeatures listed for Southern EPR-Segment I.

"Black smoker" vents (low chlorinity fluids, 374 deg C) were photographed at the "RM28" site at 18 deg 26 min S on Segment I of the Southern East Pacific Rise in November 1994 from the Japanese submersible Shinkai 6500. The narrow axial crest of Segment I of the Southern East Pacific Rise in some places is less than 50 m wide. The largest lava flow field in this EPR segment is the Animal Farm flow, named after a thriving low-temperature hydrothermal site discovered during a submersible expedition in 1993.

Image courtesy of NOAA Vents Program, 1994 (www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/chemistry/images/).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Bowles J, Gee J S, Kent D V, Bergmanis E, Sinton J, 2005. Cooling rate effects on paleointensity estimates in submarine basaltic glass and implications for dating young flows. Geochem Geophys Geosyst, 6: Q07002, doi:10.1029/2004GC000900.

Carlut J, Kent D V, 2000. Paleointensity record in zero-age submarine basalt glasses: testing a new dating technique for recent MORBs. Earth Planet Sci Lett, 183: 389-401.

Sinton J M, Smaglik S M, Mahoney J J, Macdonald K C, 1991. Magmatic processes at superfast spreading Mid-Ocean Ridges: glass compositional variations along the East Pacific Rise 13°-23° S. J Geophys Res, 96: 6133-6155.

Sinton J, Bergmanis E, Rubin K, Batiza R, Gregg T K P, Gronvold K, Macdonald K C, White S M, 2002. Volcanic eruptions on mid-ocean ridges: new evidence from the superfast spreading East Pacific Rise, 17°-19° S. J Geophys Res, 107: 2115, doi:10.1029/2000JB000090.

Volcano Types

Submarine
Fissure vent(s)

Tectonic Setting

Rift zone
Oceanic crust (< 15 km)

Rock Types

Major
Basalt / Picro-Basalt

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
0
0
0
0

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Southern EPR-Segment I Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.