Hood

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 45.374°N
  • 121.695°W

  • 3426 m
    11237 ft

  • 322010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

26 June-2 July 2002

CVO reported that the strongest earthquake in the Mount Hood area in decades occurred on 29 June at 0736. The widely felt M 4.5 event was located ~4.5 km S of the summit at a depth of 6 km. Hundreds of aftershocks followed, including two greater than M 3. Typically, several earthquake swarms occur each year at Mount Hood.

Sources: US Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO), Associated Press



 Available Weekly Reports


2002: June
2001: January | September


26 June-2 July 2002

CVO reported that the strongest earthquake in the Mount Hood area in decades occurred on 29 June at 0736. The widely felt M 4.5 event was located ~4.5 km S of the summit at a depth of 6 km. Hundreds of aftershocks followed, including two greater than M 3. Typically, several earthquake swarms occur each year at Mount Hood.

Sources: US Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO), Associated Press


12 September-18 September 2001

The USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory reported that a minor earthquake swarm occurred at Mount Hood from 9 September until at least 14 September. About 25 events were detected, with a maximum magnitude of 2.9. The epicenters of the earthquakes were ~8 km SSW of the volcano's summit at depths of 1-7 km. These types of swarms occur once or twice per year at Mount Hood.

Source: US Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO)


17 January-23 January 2001

The Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) reported that during 10-20 January a swarm of 13 earthquakes with magnitudes ranging from 0.2-2.0 occurred in an area about 4-8 km SSE of the summit at a depth of 4-7 km. This activity is not abnormal; Mount Hood averages one to two small swarms a year, with the last swarm occurring in May 2000. The current swarm consisted of fewer and smaller events than is typical, but it may not have yet ended.

Sources: US Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO), Associated Press


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1907 Aug 28 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain     Upper SW flank (Crater Rock)
[ 1869 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1865 Sep 21 1866 Jan (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1859 Aug 15 1859 Aug 17 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1854 Aug ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1853 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1795 ± 5 years 1805 ± 5 years Confirmed   Dendrochronology Upper SW flank (Crater Rock)
1765 ± 5 years Unknown Confirmed   Dendrochronology Upper SW flank (Crater Rock)
1390 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Upper SW flank (Crater Rock)
0510 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Upper SW flank (Crater Rock)
0300 ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Upper SW flank (Crater Rock)
4940 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Lower NE flank (SSW of Parkdale)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Cameron K A, Pringle P T, 1987. A detailed chronology of the most recent major eruptive period at Mount Hood, Oregon. Geol Soc Amer Bull, 99: 845-851.

Cameron K A, Pringle P T, 1991. Prehistoric buried forests of Mount Hood. Oregon Geol, 53: 34-43.

Crandell D R, 1980. Recent eruptive history of Mount Hood, Oregon, and potential hazards from future eruptions. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1492: 1-81.

Cribb J W, Barton M, 1997. Significance of crustal and source region processes on the evolution of compositionally similar calc-alkaline lavas, Mt. Hood, Oregon. J Volc Geotherm Res, 76: 229-249.

Harris S L, 1988. Fire Mountains of the West: the Cascade and Mono Lake Volcanoes. Missoula, MT: Mountain Press, 379 p.

Hildreth W E, 2007. Quaternary magmatism in the Cascades--geologic perpectives. U S Geol Surv Prof Pap, 1744: 1-125.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

Sherrod D R, Smith J G, 1990. Quaternary extrusion rates of the Cascade Range, northwestern United States and southern British Columbia. J Geophys Res, 95: 19,465-19,474.

Wise W S, 1969. Geology and petrology of the Mount Hood area: a study of High Cascades volcanism. Geol Soc Amer Bull, 80: 969-1006.

Wise W S, 1968. Geology of the Mount Hood volcano. Oregon Dept Geol Min Ind Bull, 62: 81-98.

Wood C A, Kienle J (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge, England: Cambridge Univ Press, 354 p.

Mount Hood, Oregon's highest peak, forms a prominent backdrop to the state's largest city, Portland. The eroded summit area of Mount Hood consists of several andesitic or dacitic lava domes. Major Pleistocene edifice collapse produced a debris avalanche and lahar that traveled north down the Hood River valley and crossed the Columbia River. The glacially eroded volcano has had at least four major eruptive periods during the past 15,000 years. The last three occurred within the past 1800 years from vents high on the SW flank and produced deposits that were distributed primarily to the south and west along the Sandy and Zigzag rivers. The last eruptive period took place around 170-220 years ago, when growth of the Crater Rock lava dome was accompanied by pyroclastic flows and lahars down the White and Sandy rivers. The Sandy River lahar deposits extended to the west as far as the Columbia River and were observed by members of the 1804-1805 Lewis and Clark expedition within a few years of their emplacement. Minor 19th-century eruptions were witnessed from Portland.