Nazko

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  • Canada
  • Canada
  • Cinder cone(s)
  • 5220 BCE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 52.9°N
  • 123.73°W

  • 1230 m
    4034 ft

  • 320140
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Nazko.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Nazko.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
5220 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Hickson C J, Edwards B R, 2001. Volcanoes and Volcanic Hazards in Canada. In; Brooks G R (ed) {A Synthesis of Geological Hazards in Canada}, Geol Surv Can Bull, 548: 1-248.

Hickson C J, Soos A, Wright R, 1994. Catalogue of Canadian volcanoes. Geol Surv Canada Open-File Rpt.

Holland S S, 1976. Landforms of British Columbia, a physiographic outline. Brit Columbia Dept Mines Petrol Resour Bull, 48: 1-138 (2nd printing).

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Souther J G, Clague J J, Mathewes R W, 1987. Nazko cone: a Quaternary volcano in the eastern Anahim belt. Can J Earth Sci, 24: 2477-2485.

Tipper H W, 1959. Quesnel Cariboo District, British Columbia. Geol Surv Can Map, 12-1959.

Wood C A, Kienle J (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge, England: Cambridge Univ Press, 354 p.

Nazko Cone, the easternmost and youngest volcano of the Anahim volcanic belt in the Chilcotin-Nechako Plateau, central British Columbia, rests on glacial till. It was formed in three episodes of activity, the first of which took place during a Pleistocene interglacial stage about 0.34 million years ago (Souther et al., 1987). The second stage produced a large hyaloclastite scoria mound erupted beneath the Cordilleran ice sheet during the late Pleistocene. The final activity occurred about 7200 years ago, forming a compound subaerial basanitic cinder cone that overtopped the hyaloclastite mound and produced two small lava flows that traveled about 1 km to the west. An airfall tephra blanket extends several km to the north and east of the cone.