Edziza

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
  Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 57.72°N
  • 130.63°W

  • 2786 m
    9138 ft

  • 320060
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Edziza.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Edziza.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Edziza.

The composite felsic stratovolcano Mount Edziza and associated satellitic lava domes and pyroclastic cones were constructed over the past 7.5 million years during five magmatic cycles beginning with eruption of alkali basalts and ending with felsic and basaltic eruptions as late about 1000 years ago. The 7.5 million-year-old (Ma) Armadillo Peak stratovolcano at the south end of the complex is overlapped by the Ice Peak central volcano, which was formed during the early Pleistocene, and contains a caldera largely destroyed by glaciers. The Mount Edziza stratovolcano on the north was formed about 1.0-0.9 Ma. A 2-km-wide, ice-filled caldera truncates its summit; lava domes were subsequently emplaced around its periphery and lava lakes ponded within the caldera and overflowed its rim. Numerous ice-contact features and products of subglacial eruptions are found in the Mount Edziza complex. More than 30 Holocene pyroclastic cones, primarily of basaltic composition, are located on Mount Edziza and the adjacent Spectrum Range, some of which are younger than about 1300 years before present. Large areas of Holocene lava flows of the postglacial Big Raven Formation are located north of Mount Edziza, forming the Desolation Lava Field, and south and SW of Ice Peak, forming the Snowshoe Lava Field.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0950 ± 6000 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Fission track SW flank of Ice Peak
0610 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) NNE flank (Williams Cone)
0750 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology
6520 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) North flank?

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Cones

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Armadillo Peak Stratovolcano 2194 m 57° 32' 0" N 130° 33' 0" W
Cache Hill Shield volcano 2110 m 57° 32' 0" N 130° 40' 0" W
Camp Hill Shield volcano 1880 m 57° 35' 0" N 130° 47' 0" W
Cinder Cliff Cone 1800 m 57° 45' 0" N 130° 34' 0" W
Desolation Lava Field Vent 2165 m 57° 49' 0" N 130° 37' 0" W
Eve Pyroclastic cone 1740 m 57° 49' 0" N 130° 40' 0" W
Ice Peak Stratovolcano 2500 m 57° 42' 0" N 130° 38' 0" W
Icefall Cone 2285 m 57° 42' 0" N 130° 36' 0" W
Kana Cone 1100 m 57° 54' 0" N 130° 37' 0" W
Kena Cone 1980 m 57° 36' 0" N 130° 41' 0" W
Klastline Cone 1400 m 57° 47' 0" N 130° 30' 0" W
Moraine Cone 2135 m 57° 46' 0" N 130° 37' 0" W
Neck, the Cone 1830 m 57° 40' 0" N 130° 35' 0" W
Pillow Ridge Vent 2400 m 57° 46' 0" N 130° 38' 0" W
Ridge Cone 2285 m 57° 41' 0" N 130° 37' 0" W
Saucer, the Cone 1920 m 57° 38' 0" N 130° 38' 0" W
Sidas Cone 1540 m 57° 52' 0" N 130° 38' 0" W
Sleet Cone 1783 m 57° 47' 0" N 130° 33' 0" W
Snowshoe Lava Field Vent 2350 m 57° 39' 0" N 130° 40' 0" W
Storm Cone 2135 m 57° 46' 0" N 130° 38' 0" W
Tennena Cone 2350 m 57° 41' 0" N 130° 40' 0" W
Triplex Cone 1785 m 57° 48' 0" N 130° 37' 0" W
Tsekone Ridge Vent 1920 m 57° 46' 0" N 130° 41' 0" W
Twin Cone 1430 m 57° 48' 0" N 130° 32' 0" W
Walkout Creek Cone 1550 m 57° 35' 0" N 130° 45' 0" W
Williams Pyroclastic cone 2100 m 57° 47' 0" N 130° 36' 0" W

Craters

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Cocoa Crater - Cone 2117 m 57° 39' 0" N 130° 42' 0" W
Coffee Crater - Cone 2000 m 57° 38' 0" N 130° 40' 0" W

Domes

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Glacier Dome 2225 m 57° 46' 0" N 130° 35' 0" W
Nanook Dome 2710 m 57° 43' 0" N 130° 36' 0" W
Pharaoh Dome 2200 m 57° 39' 0" N 130° 36' 0" W
Pyramid Dome 2199 m 57° 46' 0" N 130° 34' 0" W
Sphinx Dome 2380 m 57° 45' 0" N 130° 35' 0" W
Triangle Dome 2680 m 57° 43' 0" N 130° 39' 0" W

Thermal

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Elwyn Hot Springs Hot Spring 1440 m 57° 46' 0" N 130° 45' 0" W
Taweh Hot Springs Hot Spring 1310 m 57° 41' 0" N 130° 46' 0" W
The Mount Edziza complex, seen here from the east along the Cassiar-Stewart Highway, is part of a large volcanic plateau that is the centerpiece of Mount Ediziza Provincial Park, one of the largest in British Columbia. The complex was constructed over the past 7.5 million years during five magmatic cycles beginning with eruption of alkali basalts and ending with felsic and basaltic eruptions as late about 1000 years ago. Numerous ice-contact features and products of subglacial eruptions are found in the Mount Edziza complex.

Photo by Ben Edwards, 1995 (Dickinson College, Pennsylvania).
The central ice-covered summit complex of Mount Edziza is seen here from the SW rising above the Kitsu and Big Raven plateaus. Late-Tertiary lava flows form the foreground. The low conical hills at the base of the icecap are Quaternary volcanic cones. Mount Edziza contains a 2-km-wide, ice-filled caldera that truncates its summit, and numerous ice-contact features and products of subglacial eruptions are found. The complex contains numerous Holocene pyroclastic cones, some of which are younger than about 1300 years.

Photo by Jack Souther, 1992 (Geological Survey of Canada).
The snow-covered mountains at the right-center, lying between the Mess Creek (left) and Little Iskut River (right) drainages, are in the Spectrum Range, one of four large composite volcanoes making up the Mount Edziza-Spectrum Range volcanic complex. Holocene pyroclastic cones and lava flows are found on the NW and SW sides of the Spectrum Range. The Mount Edziza complex appears at the top of this image (with north to the upper left), west of snow-covered Nuttlude and Kakiddi lakes. Elongated Kinaskan Lake is at the upper right.

NASA Space Shuttle image STS039-90-110, 1991 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Cinder cones, such as Eve Cone on the flanks of Edziza volcano, are formed by the explosive ejection of fragmental material, which accumulates around the vent. This symmetrical cone is part of the Desolation Lava Field on the northern flank of Edziza and is one of the youngest features of the volcano. Basaltic lava flows issued from the base of the cone, which rises about 150 m and has a symmetrical, 45-m-deep crater.

Photo by Ben Edwards, 1995 (Dickinson College, Pennsylvania).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Hickson C J, Edwards B R, 2001. Volcanoes and Volcanic Hazards in Canada. In; Brooks G R (ed) {A Synthesis of Geological Hazards in Canada}, Geol Surv Can Bull, 548: 1-248.

Hickson C J, Soos A, Wright R, 1994. Catalogue of Canadian volcanoes. Geol Surv Canada Open-File Rpt.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Souther J G, 1967. Cordilleran volcanic project. Geol Surv Can Pap, 68-1A: 42-43.

Souther J G, 1970. Volcanism and its relationship to recent crustal movements in the Canadian Cordillera. Can J Earth Sci, 7: 553-568.

Souther J G, 1992. The late Cenozoic Mount Edziza volcanic complex, British Columbia. Geol Surv Can Mem, 420: 1-320.

Souther J G, Symons D T A, 1974. Stratigraphy and paleomagnetism of Mount Edziza volcanic complex, northwestern British Columbia. Geol Surv Can Pap, 73-32: 1-48.

Wood C A, Kienle J (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge, England: Cambridge Univ Press, 354 p.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Lava dome(s)
Pyroclastic cone(s)

Tectonic Setting

Intraplate
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Trachyte / Trachyandesite
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Trachybasalt / Tephrite Basanite
Rhyolite
Minor
Trachyandesite / Basaltic trachy-andesite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
0
0
0
898

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Edziza Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.