Imuruk Lake

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 65.6°N
  • 163.92°W

  • 610 m
    2001 ft

  • 314060
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Imuruk Lake.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Imuruk Lake.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0300 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Lost Jim Cone

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Smith R L, Shaw H R, 1975. Igneous-related geothermal systems. U S Geol Surv Circ, 726: 58-83.

Wood C A, Kienle J (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge, England: Cambridge Univ Press, 354 p.

The Oligocene-to-Holocene Imuruk monogenetic volcanic field in the central Seward Peninsula north of the Bendeleben Mountains contains around 75 small basaltic vents surrounded by voluminous lava flows. The largest and most recent vent is the Lost Jim cone, a 30-m-high cinder cone near Imuruk Lake that produced the only Holocene lava flow of the Imuruk field. The massive Lost Jim lava flow, erupted about 1655 years ago, extends 35 km west and 9 km north of the vent and covers about 230 sq km. The next youngest flow, the late-Pleistocene Camille lava flow, traveled 39 km from its vent.