Nunivak Island

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 60.02°N
  • 166.33°W

  • 511 m
    1676 ft

  • 314020
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Nunivak Island.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Nunivak Island.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Nunivak Island. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Hoare J M, Condon W H, Cox A, Dalrymple G B, 1968. Geology, paleomagnetism and potassium-argon ages of basalts [Nunivak Island]. Geol Soc Amer Mem, 116: 377-414.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Smith R L, Shaw H R, Luedke R G, Russell S L, 1978. Comprehensive tables giving physical data and thermal energy estimates for young igneous systems of the United States. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 78-925: 1-25.

Wood C A, Kienle J (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge, England: Cambridge Univ Press, 354 p.

Nunivak Island contains about 60 cinder cones and four maars; the surface of the island consists dominantly of thin pahoehoe lava flows that form a carapace over Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. The 110-km-wide permafrost-covered island lies about 30 km off the coast of SW Alaska. The widespread, thin pahoehoe lava flows originate from small shield volcanoes and cover much of the island, which is dotted throughout by cinder cones and other vents. Two of the maars have about 200 m of relief, with floors near sea level. Eruptions occurred during 5 broad periods of activity that began 6.1 million years ago and continued into the Holocene. The bulk of the >427 cu km volcanic field was formed during two Pleistocene eruptive periods that ended about 300,000 years ago. The most recent eruptions at Nunivak produced a series of alkalic basalt lava flows and ash deposits from cinder cones and maars along an E-W zone in the southern part of the island.