Mageik

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 58.195°N
  • 155.253°W

  • 2165 m
    7101 ft

  • 312150
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Mageik.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Mageik.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1946 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1936 Jul 4 ] [ 1936 Jul 5 ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1929 Aug 19 ] [ 1929 Dec ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1927 Aug 26 ± 5 days ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
0500 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Between East and Central Mageik
0550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) East Mageik
0650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) East Mageik
1650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) East Mageik
1950 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) East Mageik, ODLF tephra
4400 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) East Mageik
7380 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) East Mageik
8670 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) East Mageik

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Coats R R, 1950. Volcanic activity in the Aleutian Arc. U S Geol Surv Bull, 974-B: 35-47.

Fenner C N, 1930. Mount Katmai and Mount Mageik. Zeit Vulk, 13: 1-24.

Fierstein J, 2007. Explosive eruptive record in the Katmai region, Alaska Peninsula: an overview. Bull Volc, 69: 469-509.

Henning R A, Rosenthal C H, Olds B, Reading E (eds), 1976. Alaska's volcanoes, northern link in the ring of fire. Alaska Geog, 4: 1-88.

Hildreth W, 1987. New perspectives on the eruption of 1912 in the Valley of Ten Tousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska. Bull Volc, 49: 680-693.

Hildreth W, Fierstein J, 2000. Katmai volcanic cluster and the great eruption of 1912. Geol Soc Amer Bull, 112: 1594-1620.

Hildreth W, Fierstein J, Lanphere M A, Siems D F, 2000. Mount Mageik: a compound stratovolcano in Katmai National Park. In: Kelly K D, Gough L P (eds), Geologic Studies in Alaska by the U. S. Geological Survey, 1998 {U S Geol Surv Prof Pap}, 1615: 23-41.

Hildreth W, Lanphere M A, Fierstein J, 2003b. Geochronology and eruptive history of the Katmai volcanic cluster, Alaska Peninsula. Earth Planet Sci Lett, 214: 93-114.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Miller T P, McGimsey R G, Richter D H, Riehle J R, Nye C J, Yount M E, Dumoulin J A, 1998. Catalogue of the historically active volcanoes of Alaska. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 98-582: 1-104.

Motyka R J, Liss S A, Nye C J, Moorman M A, 1993. Geothermal resources of the Aleutian arc. Alaska Div Geol Geophys Surv, Prof Rpt, no 114, 17 p and 4 map sheets.

Smith R L, Shaw H R, Luedke R G, Russell S L, 1978. Comprehensive tables giving physical data and thermal energy estimates for young igneous systems of the United States. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 78-925: 1-25.

Wood C A, Kienle J (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge, England: Cambridge Univ Press, 354 p.

Mount Mageik is a broad ice-capped stratovolcano at the head of the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes across Katmai Pass from Trident volcano. Four small overlapping peaks form the broad summit, three of which lie along a NE-SW trend south of the northern peak. The central summit consists of a lava dome, while the east, SW, and north volcanoes are capped by fragmental cones with ice-filled craters. The three westernmost summits are glaciated and of primarily Pleistocene age, but the East Mageik summit cone was the source of at least six Holocene eruptive episodes and fed Holocene lava flows that descended toward Katmai Pass and blanket the NE-to-SE flanks of the volcano. A young, 300-m-wide explosion crater between the east and central summits that formed about 2400-2500 years ago contains a shallow, acidic lake and many superheated fumarole jets. Three Holocene debris avalanches from south-flank failures descended into the Martin Creek drainages, one perhaps reaching the coast. Reports of historical eruptions from Mageik were questioned by Miller et al. (1998) and Hildreth and Fierstein (2000).