Martin

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 58.172°N
  • 155.361°W

  • 1863 m
    6111 ft

  • 312140
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

11 January-17 January 2006

Increased seismicity occurred at Martin during 8 January until at least 15 January. About 300 earthquakes were recorded during 2 days, in contrast to the background rate of ~25 earthquakes per month since the seismic network was installed in 1996. AVO increased the Concern Color Code to Yellow. AVO reported that swarms of earthquakes of this nature are common at volcanoes such as Martin, and do not suggest that eruptive activity is imminent. Satellite data showed nothing unusual, although steaming is frequently observed at the volcano.

Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)



 Available Weekly Reports


2006: January


11 January-17 January 2006

Increased seismicity occurred at Martin during 8 January until at least 15 January. About 300 earthquakes were recorded during 2 days, in contrast to the background rate of ~25 earthquakes per month since the seismic network was installed in 1996. AVO increased the Concern Color Code to Yellow. AVO reported that swarms of earthquakes of this nature are common at volcanoes such as Martin, and do not suggest that eruptive activity is imminent. Satellite data showed nothing unusual, although steaming is frequently observed at the volcano.

Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1953 Feb 17 Unknown Confirmed   Unknown
1951 Jul 22 Unknown Confirmed   Unknown
0800 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
1750 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Fierstein J, 2007. Explosive eruptive record in the Katmai region, Alaska Peninsula: an overview. Bull Volc, 69: 469-509.

Hildreth W, Fierstein J, 2000. Katmai volcanic cluster and the great eruption of 1912. Geol Soc Amer Bull, 112: 1594-1620.

Hildreth W, Fierstein J, Lanphere M A, Siems D F, 1999. Alogogshak volcano: a Pleistocene andesite-dacite stratovolcano in Katmai National Park. In: Kelly K D (ed), Geologic Studies in Alaska by the U. S. Geological Survey, 1997 {U S Geol Surv Prof Pap}, 1614: 105-113.

Hildreth W, Lanphere M A, Fierstein J, 2003b. Geochronology and eruptive history of the Katmai volcanic cluster, Alaska Peninsula. Earth Planet Sci Lett, 214: 93-114.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Keller A S, Reiser H N, 1959. Geology of the Mt. Katmai Area, Alaska.. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1058-G: 264-268.

Miller T P, McGimsey R G, Richter D H, Riehle J R, Nye C J, Yount M E, Dumoulin J A, 1998. Catalogue of the historically active volcanoes of Alaska. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 98-582: 1-104.

Motyka R J, Liss S A, Nye C J, Moorman M A, 1993. Geothermal resources of the Aleutian arc. Alaska Div Geol Geophys Surv, Prof Rpt, no 114, 17 p and 4 map sheets.

Smith R L, Shaw H R, Luedke R G, Russell S L, 1978. Comprehensive tables giving physical data and thermal energy estimates for young igneous systems of the United States. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 78-925: 1-25.

The mostly ice-covered Mount Martin stratovolcano lies at the SW end of the Katmai volcano cluster in Katmai National Park. The volcano was named for George C. Martin, the first person to visit and describe the Katmai area after the 1912 eruption. Mount Martin is capped by a 300-m-wide summit crater, which is ice-free because of an almost-constant steam plume and contains a shallow acidic lake. The edifice overlies glaciated lava flows of the adjacent mid- to late-Pleistocene Alagoshak volcano on the WSW and was constructed entirely during the Holocene. Mount Martin consists of a small fragmental cone that was the source of ten thick overlapping blocky dacitic lava flows, largely uneroded by glaciers, that descend 10 km to the NW, cover 31 sq km, and form about 95% of the eruptive volume of the volcano. Two reports of historical eruptions that originated from uncertain sources were attributed by Muller et al. (1954) to Martin.