Stepovak Bay 3

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 55.929°N
  • 160.002°W

  • 1555 m
    5100 ft

  • 312052
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Stepovak Bay 3.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Stepovak Bay 3.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Stepovak Bay 3. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Alaska Volcano Observatory, 2005-. Volcanoes. http://www.avo.alaska.edu/volcanoes.php.

Wilson F H, 1989. Geologic setting, petrology, and age of Pliocene to Holocene volcanoes of the Stepovak Bay Area, Western Alaska Peninsula. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1903: 84-95.

Wood C A, Kienle J (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge, England: Cambridge Univ Press, 354 p.

Yount M E, Wilson F H, Miller J W, 1985. Newly discovered Holocene volcanic vents, Port Moller and Stepovak Bay quadrangles. In: Bartsch-Winkler S, Reed K M (eds), The United States Geological Survey in Alaska: Accomplishments in 1983, {U S Geol Surv Circ}, 945: 60-62.

A group of four late-Pleistocene to Holocene volcanoes is located along a NE-trending line SW of Kupreanof volcano. Stepovak Bay 3 cinder cone, located 3.5 km to the NE of Stepovak 2 cone, has a thick Holocene lava flow that originated from an indistinct, ice-filled 300-m-wide crater and entered the same valley as the lava flow from Stepovak Bay 2 (Wilson, 1989). Elsewhere (in Wood and Kienle, 1990), Wilson noted uncertainty about Holocene activity from Stepovak Bay 3.