Emmons Lake

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 55.341°N
  • 162.079°W

  • 1436 m
    4710 ft

  • 312020
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Emmons Lake.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Emmons Lake.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Emmons Lake. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Kennedy G C, Waldron H H, 1955. Geology of Pavlof volcano and vicinity Alaska. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1028-A: 1-18.

Motyka R J, Liss S A, Nye C J, Moorman M A, 1993. Geothermal resources of the Aleutian arc. Alaska Div Geol Geophys Surv, Prof Rpt, no 114, 17 p and 4 map sheets.

Newhall C G, Dzurisin D, 1988. Historical unrest at large calderas of the world. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1855: 1108 p, 2 vol.

Smith R L, Shaw H R, Luedke R G, Russell S L, 1978. Comprehensive tables giving physical data and thermal energy estimates for young igneous systems of the United States. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 78-925: 1-25.

Smithsonian Institution-GVN, 1990-. [Monthly event reports]. Bull Global Volc Network, v 15-33.

Waythomas C F, Miller T P, Mangan M T, 2006. Preliminary volcano hazard assessment for the Emmons Lake volcanic center, Alaska. U S Geol Surv, Sci Invest Rpt, 2006-5248: 1-33.

Wood C A, Kienle J (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge, England: Cambridge Univ Press, 354 p.

The massive Emmons Lake stratovolcano, located north of Volcano Bay and SW of Pavlof volcano, is truncated by one of the largest calderas of the Aleutian arc. The 11 x 18 km caldera contains a narrow elongated lake at its SW end that drains through a breach in the SE caldera rim to the Pacific Ocean. The compound caldera was formed during six voluminous dacitic-to-rhyolitic eruptions between about 294,000 and 26,000 years ago that produced extensive ashflow tuffs. Mount Emmons, Mount Hague, and Double Crater are post-caldera cones of dominantly basaltic composition that were constructed along the SW-NE trend of the elongated caldera, which is up to 1150 m deep. Some young Holocene flows have moved through a gap in the southern caldera rim to within 3 km of the Pacific Ocean. A large fumarolic area is located on the south side of Mount Hague, and the only reported historical activity from Emmons Lake volcano was the emission of steam plumes from Hague in 1990 and 1991.