Dutton

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 55.168°N
  • 162.272°W

  • 1506 m
    4940 ft

  • 312011
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Dutton.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Dutton.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Dutton. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Miller T P, Chertkoff D G, Eichelberger J C, Coombs M L, 1999. Mount Dutton volcano, Alaska: Aleutian arc analog to Unzen volcano, Japan. J Volc Geotherm Res, 89: 275-301.

Miller T P, McGimsey R G, Richter D H, Riehle J R, Nye C J, Yount M E, Dumoulin J A, 1998. Catalogue of the historically active volcanoes of Alaska. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 98-582: 1-104.

Motyka R J, Liss S A, Nye C J, Moorman M A, 1993. Geothermal resources of the Aleutian arc. Alaska Div Geol Geophys Surv, Prof Rpt, no 114, 17 p and 4 map sheets.

Smithsonian Institution-SEAN, 1975-89. [Monthly event reports]. Bull Scientific Event Alert Network (SEAN), v 1-14.

Wood C A, Kienle J (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge, England: Cambridge Univ Press, 354 p.

The Mount Dutton volcanic center east of Cold Bay near the tip of the Alaska Peninsula consists of a glacier-covered, 1506-m-high central lava dome complex. Early andesitic lava flows and late-stage dacitic lava domes have been partially removed by one or more Holocene edifice collapses about 5100-6800 years ago. This created debris avalanches that traveled to the west and to the south, reaching Belkofski Bay. The important regional fishing center of King Cove lies less than 15 km from the volcano, and the village's airstrip is built on top of the southern avalanche deposit. A steep-sided complex of lava domes forms the summit of the volcano, and young block-and-ash flow deposits extend to the east. Two small unglaciated lava domes on the NE flank 3.5 km from the summit are also of Holocene age. Major earthquake swarms near the volcano were recorded in 1984-85 and 1988.