Korovin

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  • United States
  • Alaska
  • Stratovolcano(es)
  • 2007 CE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 52.381°N
  • 174.154°W

  • 1533 m
    5028 ft

  • 311161
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Korovin.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Korovin.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Korovin.

Korovin, the most frequently active volcano of the large volcanic complex at the NE tip of Atka Island, contains a 1533-m-high double summit with two craters located along a NW-SE line. The NW summit has a small crater, but the 1-km-wide crater of the SE cone has an unusual, open cylindrical vent of widely variable depth that sometimes contains a crater lake or a high magma column. A fresh-looking cinder cone lies on the flank of partially dissected Konia volcano, located on the SE flank of Korovin. The volcano is dominantly basaltic in composition, although some late-stage dacitic lava flows are present on both Korovin and Konia.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2006 Nov 25 ± 5 days 2007 Mar 3 (in or before) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2005 Feb 23 2005 May 5 ± 4 days Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2004 Jul 4 (in or before) Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2002 Jul (in or before) Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1998 May 8 ± 1 days 1998 Jul 8 (?) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
[ 1996 Jun 29 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
1987 Mar 4 (?) 1987 Mar 19 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1986 May 23 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 1  
[ 1976 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1973 Aug 25 ± 2 days Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
[ 1953 ] [ 1954 ] Uncertain    
[ 1951 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1907 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
[ 1844 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1829 ] [ 1830 ] Uncertain    

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.



Synonyms
Korowinsky


Cones
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Konia Stratovolcano 1125 m 52° 21' 37" N 174° 7' 45" W
The 200 cu km Atka volcanic complex at the NE tip of Atka Island is the largest volcanic center in the central Aleutians. A central shield volcano and caldera is ringed by 7 or 8 satellitic volcanoes. This view, from the south near Atka village, shows 1533-m-high Korovin volcano, the highest and northernmost of three Holocene stratovolcanoes of the Atka volcanic complex. Korovin has been the most active during historical time, but Sarichef and Kliuchef volcanoes may also have had historical eruptions.

Photo by James Dickson, 1986 (courtesy of John Reeder, Alaska Div. Geology Geophysical Surveys).
An unusually clear view from the NE in June 1986 shows steam rising from the summit crater of Korovin volcano, north of the Atka volcanic center. Korovin has been reported to have an unusual, open cylindrical vent of greatly variable depth. Pilots overflying the crater have reported that it sometimes contains a crater lake and at other times a high magma column.

Photo by Harold Wilson (Peninsula Airways), 1986 (courtesy of John Reeder, Alaska Div. Geology & Geophysical Surveys).
A steam plume, possibly containing minor amounts of ash, rises above the summit of Korovin volcano on March 4, 1987. This view of Korovin, north of the Atka volcanic center, was taken from the south. A satellite image on March 18 showed 3 distinct plumes, originating from Korovin and 2 vents to the south, that extended 95 km to the south. Pilots observed ash clouds and "flames" from Korovin and two vents that appeared to be on the SW flank of Kliuchev volcano.

Photo by Harold Wilson (Peninsula Airways), 1987 (courtesy of John Reeder, Alaska Div. Geology Geophysical Surveys).
Korovin volcano is seen from the south, with the satellitic cone of Konia on its SE flank to the left of the person at the right. Korovin is the most frequently active volcano of the large volcanic complex at the NE tip of Atka Island, and contains a 1533-m-high double summit with two craters located along a NW-SE line. The NW summit has a small crater, but the 1-km-wide crater of the SE cone has an unusual, open cylindrical vent of widely variable depth that sometimes contains a crater lake or a high magma column.

Photo by Jim Myers, 1997 (University of Wyoming; courtesy of Alaska Volcano Observatory).
A satellite image on July 4, 2004 showed fresh ash deposits on the upper east flank of Korovin, probably from minor phreatic eruptions through a hot, roiling lake in the south summit crater of Korovin. This photo, taken from the SE, show debris mantling the upper slopes of Korovin's SE crater.

Photo by Game McGimsey, 2004 (Alaska Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey).
A telephoto view on March 3, 2007 shows a light-gray layer ash covering the west flank of Korovin volcano. In late November, 2006, satellite information showed a light dusting of ash on the E flank of the main crater along with several plumes and/or their shadows visible along the N side of the crater. On December 11 and 21, 2006, Atka residents again witnessed steam plumes, on the latter date possibly containing ash.

Photo by Kerry Moore, 2007 (courtesy of Alaska Volcano Observatory).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Coats R R, 1950. Volcanic activity in the Aleutian Arc. U S Geol Surv Bull, 974-B: 35-47.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Miller T P, McGimsey R G, Richter D H, Riehle J R, Nye C J, Yount M E, Dumoulin J A, 1998. Catalogue of the historically active volcanoes of Alaska. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 98-582: 1-104.

Motyka R J, Liss S A, Nye C J, Moorman M A, 1993. Geothermal resources of the Aleutian arc. Alaska Div Geol Geophys Surv, Prof Rpt, no 114, 17 p and 4 map sheets.

Myers J D, 1994. The Geology, Geochemistry and Petrology of the recent Magmatic Phase of the Central and Western Aleutian Arc. Unpublished manuscript, unpaginated.

Myers J D, March B D, Sinha A K, 1985. Strontium isotopic and selected trace element variations between two Aleutian volcanic centers (Adak and Atka): implications for the development of arc volcanic plumbing systems. Contr Mineral Petr, 91: 221-234.

Myers J D, Marsh B D, Frost C D, Linton J A, 2002. Petrologic constraints on the spatial distribution of crustal magma chambers, Atka volcanic center, central Aleutian arc. Contr Mineral Petr, 143: 567-586.

Smith R L, Shaw H R, Luedke R G, Russell S L, 1978. Comprehensive tables giving physical data and thermal energy estimates for young igneous systems of the United States. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 78-925: 1-25.

Wood C A, Kienle J (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge, England: Cambridge Univ Press, 354 p.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano(es)
Cinder cone

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite
Dacite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
0
0
205
205

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Korovin Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.