Segula

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 52.015°N
  • 178.136°E

  • 1160 m
    3805 ft

  • 311030
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Segula.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Segula.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Segula. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Coats R R, 1956c. Reconnaissance geology of some western Aleutian islands, Alaska.. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1028-E: 83-100.

Coombs M L, White S M, Scholl D W, 2007b. Massive edifice failure at Aleutian arc volcanoes. Earth Planet Sci Lett, 256: 403-418.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Motyka R J, Liss S A, Nye C J, Moorman M A, 1993. Geothermal resources of the Aleutian arc. Alaska Div Geol Geophys Surv, Prof Rpt, no 114, 17 p and 4 map sheets.

Nelson W H, 1959. Geology of Segula, Davidof, and Khvostof Islands, Alaska. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1028-K: 257-266.

Smith R L, Shaw H R, Luedke R G, Russell S L, 1978. Comprehensive tables giving physical data and thermal energy estimates for young igneous systems of the United States. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 78-925: 1-25.

The 6 x 7 km island of Segula east of Kiska volcano consists of a conical stratovolcano cut by a prominent NNW-SSE-trending fissure that extends to sea level at both ends of the island. The northern end of the fissure is flooded by the sea to produce a long, narrow cove. Segula was constructed above a 100-m-deep submarine platform that extends eastward to Khvostof and Davidof islands. A submarine debris-avalanche deposit extends up to 18 km offshore to the north. The summit of Segula contains a small, poorly defined caldera that is partly overtopped on the south by a cinder cone that forms the 1153 m high point of the island and on the north by extensive lava flows that reach the NE coast along a broad front. Another lava field on the SE coast originated from a cinder cone at 300 m altitude on the SE flank. No historical eruptions are known from Segula, but Nelson (1959) considered fresh lava flows on the north flank to possibly be only a few hundred years old.