Vitim Plateau

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 53.7°N
  • 113.3°E

  • 1250 m
    4100 ft

  • 302040
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Vitim Plateau.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Vitim Plateau.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Vitim Plateau. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Hasenaka T, Litasov Y, Taniguchi H, Miyamoto T, Fujimaki H, 1999. Cenozoic volcanism in Siberia: a review. Center for Northeast Asian Studies, Tohoku Univ, no 3, p 249-272.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Johnson J S, Gibson S A, Thompson R N, Nowell G M, 2005. Volcanism in the Vitim volcanic field, Siberia: geochemical evidence for a mantle plume beneath the Baikal Rift Zone. J Petr, 46: 1309-1344.

Rasskazov S V, Kunk M J, Luhr J F, Bowring S A, Brandt I S, Brandt S B, Ivanov A V, 1996. Episodes of eruptions and composition variations of the Quaternary lavas in the Baikal Rift System (Ar-Ar and K-Ar dating of volcanism in the Dzhida River area). Russian Geol Geophys, 37(6): 1-12.

Whitford-Stark J L, 1987. A survey of Cenozoic volcanism on mainland Asia. Geol Soc Amer Spec Pap, 213: 1-74.

Volcanism in the Vitim Plateau dates back to the Miocene and covers an area of nearly 10,000 sq km east of the northern part of Lake Baikal. The most voluminous activity at the Vitim volcanic field took place from the Miocene to Pleistocene, but a second phase occurred during the Pleistocene and Holocene. The latest dated eruption was at about 810,000 years ago. Most of the volcanic centers are located in the NW part of the volcanic field, parallel to the axial part of the Baikal Rift Zone, which lies about 200 km to the west. Mantle zenoliths are found in several locations.