Shiveluch

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 56.653°N
  • 161.36°E

  • 3283 m
    10768 ft

  • 300270
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

16 April-22 April 2014

KVERT reported that during 4-11 April lava-dome extrusion onto Shiveluch’s SE flank was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, and fumarolic activity. Satellite images showed a bright thermal anomaly daily, and ash plumes that drifted SE at an altitude of 4 km (13,000 ft) a.s.l. during 16-17 April. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)



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16 April-22 April 2014

KVERT reported that during 4-11 April lava-dome extrusion onto Shiveluch’s SE flank was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, and fumarolic activity. Satellite images showed a bright thermal anomaly daily, and ash plumes that drifted SE at an altitude of 4 km (13,000 ft) a.s.l. during 16-17 April. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 April-15 April 2014

KVERT reported that during 4-11 April lava-dome extrusion onto Shiveluch’s SE flank was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, and fumarolic activity. A bright thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 April-8 April 2014

KVERT reported that during 28 March-4 April lava-dome extrusion at Shiveluch was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, and fumarolic activity. A bright thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 March-1 April 2014

KVERT reported that during 21-28 March lava-dome extrusion at Shiveluch was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, and fumarolic activity. A bright thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 March-25 March 2014

KVERT reported that during 14-21 March lava-dome extrusion at Shiveluch was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, and fumarolic activity. A bright thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 March-18 March 2014

KVERT reported that during 7-14 March lava-dome extrusion at Shiveluch was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, and fumarolic activity. A bright thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 March-11 March 2014

KVERT reported that during 28 February-7 March lava-dome extrusion at Shiveluch was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, and fumarolic activity. A bright thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 February-4 March 2014

KVERT reported that during 21-28 February lava-dome extrusion at Shiveluch was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, and fumarolic activity. A bright thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images, and a gas-and-steam plume containing small amounts of ash drifted 135 km SE on 25 February. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 February-25 February 2014

KVERT reported that during 14-21 February lava-dome extrusion at Shiveluch was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. On 19 February a gas-and-steam plume containing small amounts of ash rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted about 50 km SSE. On 25 February satellite images detected ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-4.5 km (13,100-14,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 February-18 February 2014

KVERT reported that during 7-14 February lava-dome extrusion at Shiveluch was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected in satellite images on 9 and 12 February; cloud cover prevented views on the other days. Pyroclastic flow deposits on the SW flank from the 6 February were observed to be 12 km long. On 17 February at 1108 video data showed an ash plume rising to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 February-11 February 2014

KVERT reported that during 31 January-7 February a newer lava dome continued to extrude onto the NW part of Shiveluch's older lava dome. Lava-dome extrusion was accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected in satellite images during 3-4 February. Based on interpretation of seismic data, a large explosion that started at 1245 on 6 February and ended at 0440 on 7 February generated an ash plume that rose to altitudes of 9-10 km (29,500-32,800) a.s.l. A satellite image acquired at 0705 on 7 February showed a large ash cloud (240 x 180 km) over the Sea of Okhotsk 320 km WNW at an altitude of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 January-4 February 2014

KVERT reported that during 24-31 January a newer lava dome continued to extrude onto the NW part of Shiveluch's older lava dome. Lava-dome extrusion was accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images, and ash plumes rose to altitudes of 7-8 km (23,000-26,200 ft) a.s.l. on 23 January and drifted N. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 January-28 January 2014

KVERT reported that during 17-24 January a newer lava dome continued to extrude onto the NW part of Shiveluch's older lava dome. Lava-dome extrusion was accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Moderate ash explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400) a.s.l. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images, and ash plumes rose to altitudes of 7-8 km (23,000-26,200 ft) a.s.l. during 20-21 January and drifted 300 km WNW during 20-22 January. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 January-21 January 2014

KVERT reported that during 10-17 January a newer lava dome continued to extrude onto the NW part of Shiveluch's older lava dome. Lava-dome extrusion was accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Moderate ash explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400) a.s.l. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images, and ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700) a.s.l. drifted 110 km ENE on 10 January. Explosions on 12 January generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 8-9 km (26,200-29,500 ft) a.s.l., and drifted 400 km SW during 12-13 January. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


8 January-14 January 2014

KVERT reported that during 3-10 January a newer lava dome continued to extrude onto the NW part of Shiveluch's older lava dome. Lava-dome extrusion was accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Moderate ash explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400) a.s.l. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images, and ash plumes drifted 360 km SW and 278 km WNW on 7 and 9 January, respectively. On 12 January strong explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 7-8 km (23,000-26,200 ft) a.s.l. and drifted ESE. The next day a video camera recorded an ash plume from an explosion that again rose to altitudes of 7-8 km (23,000-26,200 ft) a.s.l. The ash plume drifted 50 km WSW. According to a news report minor amounts of ash fell in Klyuchi Village, 50 km SW. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), RIA Novosti


1 January-7 January 2014

KVERT reported that during 27 December 2013-2 January 2014 a newer lava dome extruded onto the NW part of Shiveluch's older lava dome. Lava-dome extrusion was accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Moderate ash explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400) a.s.l. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 December-31 December 2013

KVERT reported that during 20-27 December a newer lava dome extruded onto the NW part of Shiveluch's older lava dome. Lava-dome extrusion was accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Moderate ash explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400) a.s.l. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 December-24 December 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 13-20 December a new lava dome extruded onto the NW part of Shiveluch's older lava dome. Moderate explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400) a.s.l. Lava-dome extrusion was accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. Several strong explosions on 17 December generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 5.5-6 km (18,000-19,700 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 December-17 December 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 6-13 December a new lava dome extruded onto the NW part of Shiveluch's older lava dome. Moderate ash explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400) a.s.l. Lava-dome extrusion was accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. On 17 December satellite images showed an ash plume drifting 50 km NW at altitudes of 4.5-5 km (14,800-16,400 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 December-10 December 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 29 November-6 December a new lava dome extruded onto the NW part of Shiveluch's older lava dome. Moderate ash explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400) a.s.l. Lava-dome extrusion was accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 November-3 December 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 22-29 November a new lava dome extruded onto the NW part of Shiveluch's older lava dome. Moderate ash explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400) a.s.l. Lava-dome extrusion was accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. On 3 December activity increased and hot avalanches occurred continuously. Video data showed ash plumes rising to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400) a.s.l. and drifting 20 km NW. A strong explosive event began at 1325 and generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 8-9 km (26,200-29,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW. Pyroclastic flows descended the SW and NW flanks. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Red. Later that day KVERT noted that the strong explosive phase had ended; the Aviation Color Code was lowered back to Orange. An ash plume observed in satellite images was 200 km long and extended N. Ashfall was reported in Ivashka Village.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 November-26 November 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 15-22 November a viscous lava flow effused onto the N and NE flanks of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, ash explosions, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. Explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 November-19 November 2013

KVERT reported that during 8-15 November several strong explosions from Shiveluch generated ash plumes that rose to a maximum altitude of 7 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. Viscous lava continued to effuse onto the N and NE flanks of the lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, ash explosions, and fumarolic activity. A daily thermal anomaly was detected in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 November-12 November 2013

KVERT reported that during 1-8 November several strong explosions from Shiveluch generated ash plumes that rose to an maximum altitude of 7 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. Ash plumes drifted more than 290 km SE. Viscous lava continued to effuse onto the N and NE flanks of the lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, ash explosions, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 October-5 November 2013

KVERT reported that the current eruption continued through the week and included several strong ash eruptions that sent plumes to altitudes of 7-10 km (~22,000-33,000 ft) and drifted more than 200 km to the NE. Visual and satellite observations determined that lava extrusion continued on the NE and N flanks of the lava dome. This viscous block lava generated moderate ash explosions; fumarolic activity, hot avalanches, and incandescence at the summit also continued. A thermal anomaly was detected in daily satellite images.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 October-29 October 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 19-25 October a viscous lava flow effused onto the N and NE flanks of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, ash explosions, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 October-22 October 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 11-18 October a viscous lava flow effused onto the N and NE flanks of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, ash explosions, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images.

At 1528 on 18 October video data showed ash plumes rising to altitudes of 9-10 km (29,500-32,800 ft) a.s.l. Several explosions during 1506-1528 generated ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Red. Video images showed ash plumes rising to 6-7 km (19,700-23,000 ft) a.s.l. at 1634, to altitudes of 7-7.5 km (23,000-24,600 ft) a.s.l. at 1708 and 1722, and to altitudes of 9 km (29,500 ft) a.s.l. at 1753 and 1759. KVERT announced that the Aviation Color Code was lowered to Orange at 2038. Continuous ash emissions produced plumes that rose 3-3.5 km (9,800-11.500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S. The lava dome continued to grow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 September-24 September 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 13-20 September a viscous lava flow effused onto the N and NW flanks of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, ash explosions, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected in satellite images during 15-16 September; clouds obscured views on the other days. Video data showed that at 1454 on 20 September an ash plume rose to altitudes of 5-5.5 km (16,400-18,000) a.s.l. and drifted 20 km NE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 September-17 September 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 6-13 September a viscous lava flow effused onto the N and NW flanks of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. At 1128 on 12 September video data showed an ash plume that rose to altitudes of 5-5.5 km (16,400-18,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 30 km SE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 September-10 September 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 30 August-6 September a viscous lava flow effused onto the N and NW flanks of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 August-3 September 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 23-30 August a viscous lava flow effused onto the N and NW flanks of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. A thermal anomaly was detected daily in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 August-27 August 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 16-23 August a viscous lava flow effused onto the N and NW flanks of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 3.5-4.5 km (11,500-14,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and NE. A thermal anomaly was detected in satellite images during 16-18 and 20-23 August; cloud cover obscured views on 19 August. On 27 August video images showed an ash plume rising 3.5-4 km (11,500-13,100 ft) a.sl. and drifting 30 km SE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 August-20 August 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 9-17 August a viscous lava flow effused onto the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly during 9-12, 14, and 16-17 August; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. Explosions generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 5-7 km (16,400-23,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and NE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 August-13 August 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 2-9 August a viscous lava flow effused on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly during 3-6, 8, and 10-11 August. Explosions during 4-5 August generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 5-7 km (16,400-23,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SSE. A video camera recorded ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 7-7.5 km (23,000-24,600 ft) a.s.l. during 10-11 August. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


31 July-6 August 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 26 July-2 August a viscous lava flow effused on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite images detected a daily thermal anomaly.

A strong explosion at 2255 on 26 July generated ash plumes that rose as high as 10 km (23,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 520 km SE. Pyroclastic flows traveled 5 km. An ash cloud 15 x 7 km was observed in satellite images about 60 km SE of the volcano on 29 July. At 1707 on 4 August video images showed an ash plume rising to altitudes of 4.5-5 km (14,800-16,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifting 50 km E. The next day the seismic network detected an explosion at 1604; video images showed an ash plume rising to altitudes of 6.5-7 km (21,300-23,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifting 50 km ESE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 July-30 July 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 19-26 July a viscous lava flow effused on the N flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite images detected a daily thermal anomaly. Based on analyses of satellite images, the Tokyo VAAC reported a possible eruption on 27 July. Ash was detected in images the next day. The VAAC also noted that, according to the Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Services (KBGS; Russian Academy of Sciences), ash plumes rose to altitudes of 6.1-6.4 km (20,000-21,000 ft) a.s.l. on 27 and 29 July. KVERT reported that at 1317 on 29 July an explosion was observed by a web camera. An ash cloud detected in satellite images rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 60 km ESE; the cloud was 15 km long and 7 km wide. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 July-23 July 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 12-19 July a viscous lava flow effused on the N flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Based on notices from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP), the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 15 July an ash plume rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. KVERT noted that satellite images detected a thermal anomaly on 15, 17, and 18 July; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 July-16 July 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 5-12 July a viscous lava flow effused on the N flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Ash plumes as high as 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. were observed during 5-6 July. Satellite images detected a daily thermal anomaly. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 July-9 July 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 28 June-5 July a viscous lava flow effused on the N flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Ash plumes as high as 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. were observed during 27-28 June and 3 July. Satellite images detected a daily thermal anomaly, and ash plumes that drifted 35 km SE on 3 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 June-2 July 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 21-28 June a viscous lava flow effused on the N flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity.

The seismic network detected a strong explosive eruption that occurred on 27 June from 0710 to 0800. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Red. Ash plumes drifted SE and SW, likely at altitudes of 10-12 km (33,000-39,400 ft) a.s.l. About 2 mm of red ash fell in Klyuchi Village, 50 km SW; ashfall was also reported in Lazo Village. Later that day the Alert Level was lowered back to Orange. Two ash explosions that occurred on 28 June at 0506 and 1001 produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 7 and 6 km (23,000 and 19,700 ft) a.s.l., respectively.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, notices from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP), and the Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Services (KBGS; Russian Academy of Sciences), the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 29-30 June an ash plume rose to an altitude of 5.5-6.4 km (18,000-21,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and SE.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 June-25 June 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 14-21 June a viscous lava flow effused on the N flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. On 22 June an explosion was detected by the seismic network at 1246 and lasted about four minutes. A second explosion at 1310 produced an ash plume observed with the web camera that rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 June-18 June 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 7-14 June a viscous lava flow effused on the N flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. Based on notices from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP), the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 14 and 16 June ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


5 June-11 June 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 31 May-7 June a viscous lava flow effused on the N flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. On 10 June the seismic network detected an explosive event at 0902 that lasted 6.5 minutes, and indicated that an ash plume possibly rose to altitudes of 7-8 km (23,000-26,200 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 May-4 June 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 24-31 May a viscous lava flow effused on the N flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 May-28 May 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 17-24 May a viscous lava flow effused on the N flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 May-21 May 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 10-16 May a viscous lava flow effused on the N flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery and notices from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP), the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 18 May ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


8 May-14 May 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 3-10 May a viscous lava flow effused on the NW and NE flanks of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


1 May-7 May 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 26 April-3 May a viscous lava flow effused on the NW and NE flanks of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery and notices from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP), the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 5 May an ash plume rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 April-30 April 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 19-26 April a viscous lava flow effused on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 April-23 April 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 12-19 April a viscous lava flow effused on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 22 April ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE. Subsequent images that day showed that the ash had dissipated. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 April-16 April 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 5-12 April a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 April-9 April 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 29 March-5 April a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. An explosion on 5 April observed by video generated an ash plume that rose to altitudes of 5.5-6 km (16,400-19,700 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 March-2 April 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 22-29 March a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 March-26 March 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 15-22 March a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 March-19 March 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 8-15 March a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 March-12 March 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 28 February-7 March a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. A single explosion on 4 March produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. Collapses of hot material on 6 March generated ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 200 km SE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 February-5 March 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 22 February-2 March a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. Based on video images, KVERT reported that explosions produced a gas-and-ash plume that rose to an altitude of 9 km (29,500 ft) a.s.l. on 4 March, and an ash plume rose 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 20 km SE on 6 March. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 February-26 February 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 15-22 February a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 February-19 February 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 8-15 February a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 February-12 February 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 1-8 February a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 January-5 February 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 25 January-1 February a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 January-29 January 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 18-25 January a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 January-22 January 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 11-18 January a viscous lava flow effused on the E flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 January-15 January 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 4-11 January a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 January-8 January 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 28 December-4 January a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 December-1 January 2013

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 21-28 December a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 December-25 December 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 14-21 December a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 December-18 December 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 7-14 December a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 December-11 December 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 30 November-7 December a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 29 November and 3-6 December; cloud cover obscured views on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 November-4 December 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 23-30 November a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 23-26 and 29 November; cloud cover obscured views on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 November-27 November 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 16-23 November a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches, incandescence, and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 17-18 and 20-22 November; cloud cover obscured views on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 November-20 November 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 9-16 November a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 November-13 November 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 2-9 November a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. During 10-12 November weak seismicity was registered and satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly. Video images recorded gas-and-steam activity, which contained ash on 12 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery and notices from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP), the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 12 November ash plumes rose to altitudes of 3-4.3 km (10,000-14,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


31 October-6 November 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 26 October-2 November a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 October-30 October 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 19-26 October a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 20-23 October; clouds prevented views on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 October-23 October 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 12-19 October a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 12-16 October; clouds prevented views on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 October-16 October 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 5-12 October a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed ash plumes drifting 360 km SE during 4-6 October, and a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 5-7 October. A plume detected by the seismic network and observed rose to altitudes of 6-7 km (19,700-23,000 ft) a.s.l. on 6 October. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 October-9 October 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 28 September-5 October a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome on 28 September and during 1-3 October. Based on analyses of satellite imagery, notices from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP), and information from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 5 October ash plumes rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE. The next day ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l and again drifted SE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


26 September-2 October 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 21-28 September a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, accompanied by hot avalanches and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome on 21, 23, and 27 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 September-25 September 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 14-21 September a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, and was accompanied by hot avalanches and fumarolic activity. A strong explosion on 18 September generated an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 8 km (26,300 ft) a.s.l. An ash plume rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. on 20 September. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome on 14 and 19 September, and an ash plume drifting 2,000 km SE during 17-20 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 September-18 September 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 7-14 September a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NW flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, and was accompanied by hot avalanches and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly over the lava dome on 9, 11, and 13 September; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days, and during 15-16 September. Seismicity increased on 18 September. At 1119 observers noted that an ash plume rose to an altitude of 8 km (26,200 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 137 km SE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 September-11 September 2012

Based on visual observations and analyses of satellite data, KVERT reported that during 31 August-7 September a viscous lava flow continued to effuse on the NE flank of Shiveluch's lava dome, and was accompanied by hot avalanches and fumarolic activity. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly over the lava dome during 31 August and 4-5 September; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 August-4 September 2012

KVERT reported that during 24-31 August a viscous lava flow was active on the NE flank of Shiveluch's lava dome and was accompanied by hot avalanches. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly over the lava dome during 24-26 August; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 August-28 August 2012

KVERT reported that during 17-24 August a viscous lava flow was active on the NE flank of Shiveluch's lava dome and was accompanied by hot avalanches. The summit of the dome was incandescent; satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly over the area during 17-24 August. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 August-21 August 2012

KVERT reported that during 10-18 August weak seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch. Observers noted gas-and-steam activity during 15-17 August; weather conditions prevented observations of the volcano on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 10, 12-13, and 18-19 August. Seismic activity increased to moderate levels and hot avalanches were observed during 19-20 August. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


8 August-14 August 2012

KVERT reported that during 3-10 August weak seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch. Cloud cover prevented ground-based observations; however, a thermal anomaly on the volcano was detected daily in satellite imagery. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


1 August-7 August 2012

KVERT reported that during 27 July-6 August explosive activity was detected at Shiveluch; a strong explosion detected on 27 July possibly produced an ash plume that rose 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. Observers noted gas-and-steam activity during 28-29 and 21 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 July-31 July 2012

KVERT reported that during 20-29 July explosive activity was detected at Shiveluch and observers noted gas-and-steam activity. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 20, 22-26, and 28-29 July. Based on information from KEMSD and analyses of satellite images, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 27 July an eruption produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 10.1 km (33,000 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 July-24 July 2012

KVERT reported that during 13-21 July explosive activity at Shiveluch continued. Observers noted gas-and-steam activity during 12-13, 15-18, 21, and 23 July; weather conditions prevented observations of the volcano on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 13-20 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 July-17 July 2012

KVERT reported that during 6-13 July explosive activity at Shiveluch continued and seismic data indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,700 ft) a.s.l. Observers noted gas-and-steam activity on 11 and 16 July; weather conditions prevented observations of the volcano on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 7-12 and 14-16 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 July-10 July 2012

KVERT reported that during 29 June-6 July explosive activity at Shiveluch continued and seismic data indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.7 km (15,400 ft) a.s.l. Observers noted ash plumes rising to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. on 29 June; weather conditions prevented observations of the volcano on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 28-30 June and 7-10 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 June-3 July 2012

KVERT reported that during 22-29 June explosive activity at Shiveluch continued and seismic data indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 9.5 km (31,100 ft) a.s.l. Observers indicated strong gas-and-steam activity on 22 June and noted ash plumes rising to an altitude of 5.3 km (17,400 ft) a.s.l. during 24-26 June. Weather conditions prevented observations of the volcano on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome, and gas-and-steam plumes that drifted 152 km SE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 June-26 June 2012

KVERT reported that during 15-22 June explosive activity at Shiveluch continued. Visual observations revealed strong gas-and-steam activity on 15, 17, and 21 June; weather conditions prevented observations on the other days. A thermal anomaly on the lava dome was detected in satellite imagery during 15-17, 21, and 24 June. On 24 June video data showed ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 5.3 km (17,400 ft) a.s.l. Based on information from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP) and KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that ash plumes rose to altitudes of 5.2-9.8 km (17,000-32,000 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 June-19 June 2012

KVERT reported that during 8-15 June explosive activity at Shiveluch continued. During 11-13 June a thermal anomaly on the lava dome was detected in satellite imagery and ground-based observers noted strong gas-and-steam activity. Seismic data indicated that a possible ash plume rose to an altitude of 8 km (26,200 ft) a.s.l. Meteorological cloud cover prevented observations of the volcano on the other days. Based on analyses of seismic data and information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption on 15 June produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 8.2 km (27,000 ft) a.s.l. Ash was not detected in satellite images. Based on analysis of seismic data, KVERT reported that on 18 June possible ash plumes rose to altitudes of 3.4-4 km (11,200-13,100 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 June-12 June 2012

KVERT reported that during 1-8 June explosive activity at Shiveluch continued. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the active crater, accompanied by fumarolic activity. Observers noted that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8.5 km (28,000 ft) a.s.l. on 2 June. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly over the lava dome during 31 May and 1-4 June, and ash plumes drifting 152 km S and 250 km S and ENE during 2-3 June. Seismic data indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8 km (26,200 ft) a.s.l. on 5 June. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on analyses of seismic data, the Tokyo VAAC reported that a possible eruption on 6 June produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 8.2 km (27,000 ft) a.s.l. Ash was not detected in satellite images.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


30 May-5 June 2012

KVERT reported that during 25 May-1 June explosive activity at Shiveluch continued. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the active crater, and was accompanied by fumarolic activity and lava-dome incandescence. Observers noted that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 9 km (29,500 ft) a.s.l. on 25 and 27 May, and to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. during 29-30 May. Satellite imagery showed ash plumes drifting 555 km SW, SE, and E during 25-30 May, and a thermal anomaly over the lava dome during 26-29 May. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on analyses of satellite images, the Tokyo VAAC reported that a possible eruption on 2 June produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 9.1 km (30,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S. Subsequent images during 2-3 June showed ash.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 May-29 May 2012

KVERT reported that during 18-25 May explosive activity at Shiveluch continued and a thermal anomaly was observed daily in satellite imagery. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the active crater, and was accompanied by fumarolic activity and lava-dome incandescence. On 19 May seismic data indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 9.5 km (31,200 ft) a.s.l. On 20 May observers noted ash plumes rising to altitudes of 8-9 km (26,200-29,500 ft) a.s.l.; satellite images showed ash plumes drifting 410 km SW. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KVERT and KEMSD, and analyses of satellite images, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 26-29 May ash plumes from eruptions and possible eruptions rose to altitudes of 7-9.1 km (23,000-30,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE, W, and SW.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


16 May-22 May 2012

KVERT reported that explosive activity at Shiveluch continued during 11-18 May. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the active crater, and was accompanied by fumarolic activity and lava-dome incandescence. Satellite imagery during 10-12 and 15-16 May showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome. On 12 May observers reported that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8 km (26,200 ft) a.s.l. and satellite imagery showed an ash plume drifting more than 800 km E.

Based on information from KVERT and analyses of satellite images, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 20 May an ash plume rose to an altitude of 9.1 km (30,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW. Images the next day showed that the ash had dissipated.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


9 May-15 May 2012

KVERT reported that explosive activity at Shiveluch continued during 4-11 May. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the active crater and was accompanied by fumarolic activity. Seismic data and visual observations showed that ash plumes rose to altitudes of 10 and 5 km (32,800 and 16,400 ft) a.s.l. on 5 May and during 6-8 May, respectively. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 4-5 and 8-10 May. Ash plumes drifted 800 km SE on 5 May, and an ash cloud 95 km SE of the volcano was observed on 7 May.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 May-8 May 2012

KVERT reported that explosive activity at Shiveluch continued during 27 April-4 May. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption and was accompanied by fumarolic activity. Seismic data and visual observations showed that ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4 and 5.4 km (13,200 and 17,800 ft) a.s.l. on 26 April and 1 May, respectively. Satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 28-29 April and on 1 and 3 May. Explosions on 1 May produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l.; an ash cloud was observed in satellite imagery drifting 270 km NE that same day.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 April-1 May 2012

KVERT reported that explosive activity at Shiveluch continued during 20-27 April. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption and was accompanied by fumarolic activity. Seismic data and visual observations showed that ash plumes rose to an altitude greater than 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. on 24 April and were slight on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 20-22 April, and ash plumes that drifted 396 km NE on 24 April. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 April-24 April 2012

KVERT reported that explosive activity at Shiveluch continued during 13-20 April. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption and was accompanied by fumarolic activity. Observers reported that ash plumes rose to altitudes of 6.5-7.5 km (21,300-24,600 ft) a.s.l. during 16-17 April and to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400 ft) a.s.l. on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly daily on the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted 120 km N, NE, and E during 14-15 and 17-18 April. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 April-17 April 2012

KVERT reported that explosive activity at Shiveluch continued during 7-13 April. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. Satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly daily on the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted 210 km SW and SE on 6, 8, and 11 April. Seismic data indicated that ash plumes potentially rose to an altitude of 7.7 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. during 7-8 and 10-12 April, and to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. on the other days. Observers confirmed that an ash plume rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. on 8 April. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 April-10 April 2012

KVERT reported that explosive activity at Shiveluch continued during 29 March-6 April. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. Visual observations revealed that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on 30 March and 3 April. Seismic data indicated that ash plumes potentially rose to an altitude of 6.6 km (21,600 ft) a.s.l. every day. Satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 29-31 March and 3 April, and ash plumes that drifted 114 km W, E, and NE during 29-30 March and 3 April. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 March-3 April 2012

KVERT reported that explosive activity at Shiveluch continued during 23-30 March. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. During 25-26 and 28 March ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly daily on the volcano and ash plumes that drifted 192 km E and SE during 25-28 March. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 March-27 March 2012

KVERT reported that explosive activity at Shiveluch continued during 16-23 March. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. During 15-21 March ash plumes rose to altitudes of 5-6 km (16,400-19,700 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed plumes drifting 194 km E and SE during 16-18 March and a weak thermal anomaly on the volcano during 16-18 and 20 March. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 March-20 March 2012

KVERT reported that activity at Shiveluch increased on 10 March and during 10-14 March daily explosions produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 3-5 km (10,000-16,400 ft) a.s.l. During 10-16 March ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the volcano and ash plumes that drifted 64 km NE and SE during 10-11 and 13 March. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP) and satellite images, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an ash plume rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 March-13 March 2012

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was low during 2-9 March. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 2 and 5-8 March; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly over the lava dome during 3, 5, and 7-8 March. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 10 March an ash plume rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE. Yelizovo Airport (UHPP) reported that an ash plume rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 February-6 March 2012

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was low during 23 February-2 March. Ground-based observers and satellite imagery indicated that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. Seismic activity increased on 28 February and hot avalanches likely occurred at the lava dome. Satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly over the lava dome during 23-26 February. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 1-2 March; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 February-28 February 2012

KVERT reported that during 17-24 February low levels of seismic activity were detected at Shiveluch and satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly. According to visual and satellite observations, a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater that was formed during a 2010 eruption. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 19-23 February; clouds prevented observations on the other days of the week. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 February-21 February 2012

KVERT reported that low levels of seismic activity were detected at Shiveluch during 10-17 February. Satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly during 10-11 and 15-16 February. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater that was formed during a 2010 eruption. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed on 14 February; clouds prevented observations on the other days of the week. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


8 February-14 February 2012

KVERT reported that low levels of seismic activity were detected at Shiveluch 3-10 February. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater that was formed during a 2010 eruption. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome and occasional hot avalanches were observed all week. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


1 February-7 February 2012

KVERT reported that low levels of seismic activity were detected at Shiveluch during 26 January-3 February. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater that was formed during a 2010 eruption. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome and occasional hot avalanches were observed all week. Weak ash explosions from the lava dome were reported from the SE flank on 26 January. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 January-31 January 2012

KVERT reported that mostly low levels of seismic activity were detected at Shiveluch during 20-27 January, though seismicity was higher during 22-23 January. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater that was formed during a 2010 eruption. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome and occasional hot avalanches were observed during 25-26 January; clouds prevented observations on the other days of the week. Ash plumes rose to altitudes of 5-6 km (16,400-19,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 174 km NE on 23 January. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 January-24 January 2012

KVERT reported that low levels of seismic activity were detected at Shiveluch during 13-20 January, and on 14 January ash plumes were observed. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly over the lava dome every day except on 16 January. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater that was formed during a 2010 eruption and hot avalanches from the lava flow were occasionally observed at night with a web camera. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 13-14 and 17-18 January. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on satellite observations, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 22 January a possible eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW; subsequent satellite images showed that ash was present. Based on information from satellite images and KVERT, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. on 23 January and dissipated the next day.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 January-17 January 2012

KVERT reported that low levels of seismic activity were detected at Shiveluch during 6-13 January. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater that was formed during a 2010 eruption and hot avalanches from the lava flow were observed at night with a web camera. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed all week except on 10 January. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 January-10 January 2012

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 30 December-6 January. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater that was formed during a 2010 eruption. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 30-31 December and on 2 and 4 January; clouds prevented observations on the other days of the week. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 December-3 January 2012

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 23-30 December. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome and gas-and-steam plumes drifting 30 km N and SE on 24 and 27 December, respectively. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 22-24 December; clouds prevented observations on the other days of the week. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 December-27 December 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 16-23 December and a large thermal anomaly over the volcano was observed in satellite imagery. Seismic data suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5 km (17,400 ft) a.s.l. Gas-and-steam plumes containing ash drifted 250 km S during 19-20 December. Explosions produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 19 December. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 18-21 December; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 December-20 December 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 9-16 December. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 10-11 and 13-15 December; clouds prevented observations on the other days of the week. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP) and satellite images, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 19 December an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. On 20 December an ash plume drifted SE at an altitude of 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 December-13 December 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 2-9 December, and satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 3-6 December; clouds prevented observations on the other days of the week. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 November-6 December 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 25 November-2 December, and satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. A gas-and-steam plume detected in satellite imagery drifted 22 km NW on 26 November. Moderate fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 28-29 November; clouds prevented observations on the other days of the week. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 November-29 November 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 18-25 November, and satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. An ash plume detected in satellite imagery drifted 21 km W on 18 November. Strong fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed on 18, 21, and 24 November; clouds prevented observations on the other days of the week. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 November-22 November 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 11-18 November, and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to a maximum altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. Strong fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 13-14 November; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly over the lava dome during 11-14 and 17 November and gas-and-steam plumes containing ash drifted 100 km E on 14 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 November-15 November 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 4-11 November, and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to a maximum altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Ground-based observers noted that a viscous lava flow continued to effuse in the crater formed during a 2010 eruption. Strong fumarolic activity at the lava dome was observed during 2-3 and 5-9 November; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome and gas-and-steam plumes containing small amounts of ash that drifted 25 km E on 5 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 14 November an ash plume drifted E at an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


2 November-8 November 2011

KVERT reported strong seismic activity at Shiveluch during 28 October-4 November, and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7.8 km (25,600 ft) a.s.l. on 29 October and to lower altitudes on other days. Ground-based observers noted strong fumarolic activity at the lava dome during 29 October-1 November; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome and gas-and-steam plumes containing small amounts of ash that drifted 150 km E and SE during 31 October and 1-2 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 October-1 November 2011

KVERT reported strong seismic activity at Shiveluch during 21-23 October and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to altitudes of 7.1-10.6 km (23,300-34,800 ft) a.s.l. Technical reasons prevented seismic data collection during 24-28 October. Ground-based observers noted hot avalanches in the lava dome area during 23-26 October; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome and gas-and-steam plumes that drifted 170 km SE on 24 and 25 October. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP), the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 31 October an ash plume rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


19 October-25 October 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 13-18 October and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to altitudes of 8-10.5 km (26,200-34,400 ft) a.s.l. Technical reasons prevented seismic data collection during 19-21 October. Ground-based observers noted hot avalanches in the lava dome area during 13-16 October, and that plumes from those avalanches rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome and ash plumes that drifted 75 km E on 14 and 16 October. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 23 October an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 7.3 km (24,000 ft) a.s.l. The altitude was based on seismic analysis. An eruption on 24 October noted by KVERT produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


12 October-18 October 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 7-14 October. Ground-based observers noted hot avalanches from the lava dome and that plumes from those avalanches rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. An ash explosion on 8 October produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome and ash plumes that drifted 160 km E on 6 and 8 October. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 15-18 October eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 6.4-10.4 km (21,000-34,000 ft) a.s.l. An eruption on 16 October noted by KVERT produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


5 October-11 October 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 30 September-7 October. Ash plumes rose to altitudes of 6-9 km (19,700-30,000 ft) a.s.l. during 3-5 October, followed by new lava-dome extrusion. Seismicity indicated that possible ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4.5-5 km (14,800-16,400 ft) a.s.l. during 5-6 October; ground-based observers noted that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. on those same days. Satellite imagery showed a large and bright thermal anomaly on the lava dome on 5 October and ash plumes that drifted 100 km NE on 6 October. The Aviation Color Code was lowered to Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 8 October an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. Subsequent satellite images that day showed that ash was present and then had dissipated. An eruption on 10 October produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 7.3 km (24,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


28 September-4 October 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 23-30 September, and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,100 ft) a.s.l. during 23 and 26-27 September. Ground-based observers noted that ash plumes rose to altitudes of 5.5 and 4.5 km (18,000 and 14,800 ft) a.s.l. on 23 and 27 September, respectively. Ash plumes observed in satellite imagery during 23-24 September drifted 45 km E. Seismicity increased on 3 October. Ash plumes rose to altitudes of 6-9 km (19,700-29,500 ft) a.s.l. during 3-5 October. Ground-based observers noted on 5 October a brightly incandescent lava dome, which was also detected as a large and bright thermal anomaly in satellite imagery. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Red.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 September-27 September 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 16-23 September. A thermal anomaly on the volcano was also observed in satellite imagery on 15 and 18 September. Ground-based observers noted fumarolic activity during 18-20 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 24 September an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 6.4 km (21,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. Subsequent images that day showed that the ash had dissipated.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


14 September-20 September 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 9-15 September, and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to altitudes of 6.5 km (14,100 ft) and 10.3 km (33,800 ft) a.s.l. on 9 and 11 September, respectively. Ground-based observers noted ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4.7 km (15,400 ft) a.s.l. on 9 September and fumarolic activity on 9 and 14 September. A thermal anomaly on the volcano was also observed in satellite imagery on 9 and 13 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 September-13 September 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 2-9 September, and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,100 ft) a.s.l. during 2-3 September. Ground-based observers noted fumarolic activity during the week, and an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 4 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 3 September. Also on 3 September an ash cloud 19 by 11 km was observed in satellite imagery drifting 20 km E. A thermal anomaly on the volcano was also observed in satellite imagery on 5 and 7 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 10 September an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


31 August-6 September 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 26 August-1 September, and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8.6 km (28,200 ft) a.s.l. on 28 August. Ground-based observers noted fumarolic activity during 26, 28, and 30-31 August, and an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 28 August. A thermal anomaly on the volcano was observed in satellite imagery on 29 and 31 August. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP) and KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 3 September an ash plume rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE. Subsequent images that day showed that the ash had dissipated.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 August-30 August 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 19-26 August, and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8.2 km (26,900 ft) a.s.l. on 23 August. A thermal anomaly on the volcano was observed in satellite imagery on 18, 21, and 25 August. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD and analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 29 August an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. Subsequent images that day showed that continuing ash emissions had later dissipated. According to a news article, international flights were re-routed that day due to ash plumes that reportedly rose to an altitude of 8.6 km (28,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), IOL News


17 August-23 August 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 12-19 August, and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.8 km (22,300 ft) a.s.l. on 13 August and to an altitude of 7.8 km (25,600 ft) a.s.l. on 15 August. Ash plumes may have risen to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. on the other days. Gas-and-steam plumes containing ash observed in satellite imagery drifted 30 km SW on 12 August. Ground-based observers noted that an ash plume rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. on 16 August. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 August-16 August 2011

KVERT reported that seismicity at Shiveluch was moderate during 5-12 August. Seismic data indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. on 8 August, to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 10 August, and to altitudes of 4-5.5 km (13,100-18,000 ft) a.s.l. on other days. Ground-based observers indicated that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. on 6 August. Satellite imagery showed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted 60 and 20 km SE on 6 and 10 August, respectively. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 13 August a possible eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. Ash was seen in subsequent satellite images that same day. An eruption on 15 August produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 7.9 km (26,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


3 August-9 August 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 29 July-5 August. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 30 July and 1-3 August. Ground-based observers indicated that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. on 1 August and 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on 2 August. Satellite images from 1 August showed an ash plume drifting 24 km S. A strong dust storm at the volcano was observed on 3 August; a dust plume detected in satellite imagery drifted 160 km SE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 6 August an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. Ash was seen in subsequent satellite images that same day. An eruption on 9 August produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


27 July-2 August 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 22-29 July and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.7 km (15,400 ft) a.s.l. during 23 and 25-27 July. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome on 22 July; cloud cover prevented observations on other days. Ground-based observers noted fumarolic activity on 24 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 1 August an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. Ash was seen in subsequent satellite images that same day.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 July-26 July 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 15-22 July and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. during 14-15 and 20 July. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 14-15 and 18-19 July. Ash plumes drifted 13 km SW on 15 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 July-19 July 2011

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was moderate during 8-15 July and indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 10-11 and 14 July and a gas-and-steam plume that drifted 38 km SE on 10 July. Ground-based observers noted that ash plumes from explosions rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 11 and 14 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 July-12 July 2011

KVERT reported moderate seismic activity at Shiveluch during 1-8 July. Seismic data indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. on 4 and 6 July. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 2-5 July and gas-and-ash plumes that drifted 78 km NE during 4-5 July. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 June-5 July 2011

KVERT reported moderate seismic activity at Shiveluch during 24 June-1 July. Ground-based observers noted that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome on 23 and 24 June and ash plumes that drifted 107 km NW on 24 June. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 5 July a possible eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 3.4 km (11,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. A subsequent notice that day stated that ash had dissipated.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 June-28 June 2011

KVERT reported moderate seismic activity at Shiveluch during 17-24 June. Seismic data indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. on 19 June and to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 18 and 21 June. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome on 18 and 20 June and ash plumes drifting 176 km in multiple directions during 20-21 June. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 June-21 June 2011

KVERT reported moderate seismic activity at Shiveluch during 10-16 June and that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. on 15 June. Satellite imagery showed a gas-and-steam plume drifting 26 km NW on 10 June and a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 10 and 12-13 June. Meteorological clouds prevented observations on the other days. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KVERT and analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruptions on 20 June produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 6.7-10.1 km (22,000-33,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


8 June-14 June 2011

KVERT reported that during 3-10 June seismic activity at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 9 km (29,500 ft) a.s.l. on 5 June and to altitudes of 5-7 km (16,400-22,960 ft) a.s.l. during 4-6 and 8 June. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 3-4 June, and ash plumes that drifted 734 km SE on 4 June and 377 km NE during 5-6 June. Based on information from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP), the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 10 June an ash plume rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


1 June-7 June 2011

KVERT reported that during 27 May-3 June seismic activity at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4.7-9 km (15,400-29,500 ft) a.s.l. During 29-30 May satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Those same two days, ground-based observers noted that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S. Clouds prevented observations on the other days. During 30-31 May long ash clouds drifted 1,000 km SW and approached Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KVERT and analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 4 June an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. According to KEMSD, eruptions during 5-6 June produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 6.1-9.1 km (20,000-30,000 ft) a.s.l. Plumes drifted E on 5 June.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 May-31 May 2011

KVERT reported that during 20-27 May seismic activity at Shiveluch did not exceed background levels. Strong gas-and-steam activity was observed on 21 May; cloud cover prevented ground-based observations on the other days. Satellite imagery showed ash plumes drifting 58 km SW on 20 May and a thermal anomaly over the lava dome during 19-21 and 24 May. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 30-31 May eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 7.6-8.2 km (25,000-27,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S. According to news articles, ash plumes caused authorities to reroute a number of international flights in the region.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), BNO News, Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 May-24 May 2011

KVERT reported that during 15-16 May seismic data at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.4 km (11,200 ft) a.s.l. According to ground-based observations ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 15 May and to 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on 16 May. Satellite imagery showed ash plumes drifting 58 km SE on 15 May and a thermal anomaly over the lava dome during 15-16 and 19 May. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 May-17 May 2011

KVERT reported that during 5-7 May seismic data at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.9 km (12,800 ft) a.s.l. According to ground-based observations ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. on 7 May and to altitudes of 3-4 km (9,800-13,100 ft) a.s.l. during 5-6 and 8 May. Satellite imagery showed ash plumes drifting 196 km N during 5-6 May. On 7 May small ash clouds drifted S and SE, and gas-and-steam plumes drifted 230 km E. A thermal anomaly was detected during 7-8 May. KVERT noted that the Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 15 May an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 May-10 May 2011

KVERT reported that during 29 April-6 May a thermal anomaly on Shiveluch was detected in satellite imagery. According to ground-based observations during 28-29 April ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. On 1 May ash plumes observed in satellite imagery drifted 124 km NE. Seismic data indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 29 April and 2 May. KVERT noted that the Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 7 May a possible eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. Subsequent notices that day stated that ash had dissipated.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


27 April-3 May 2011

KVERT reported that during 22-29 April seismic data at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly daily on the lava dome. According to ground-based observations during 22 and 25-27 April ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N and SE. Satellite imagery showed ash plumes drifting 153 km N on 22 April and as far as 400 km SE during 23-24 and 27 April. KVERT noted that the Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 1 May an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 April-26 April 2011

KVERT reported that during 15-22 April seismic data at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.2 km (10,500 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 15-18 and 20 April, and ash plumes that drifted 55 km NE on 17 April. Based on information from KEMSD and information from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP), the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 22 April an eruption produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.3-7.3 km (14,000-24,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and NW. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 April-19 April 2011

KVERT reported that during 1-7 April seismic data at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,100 ft) a.s.l. On 8 April gas-and-steam plumes were observed from the ground and a thermal anomaly over the lava dome was observed in satellite imagery. Ash plumes drifted 33 km NW on 11 April. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 April-12 April 2011

KVERT reported that during 1-7 April seismic data at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. Ground-based observations during 1-2 April indicated that gas-and-steam plumes containing ash rose to an altitude of 2.7 km (8,800 ft) a.s.l. A thermal anomaly on the lava dome was observed in satellite imagery those same two days. Ash plumes drifted in different directions as far as 187 km during 1-3 and 5 April. The Tokyo VAAC reported that on 7 April a possible eruption detected in satellite imagery produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,000 ft) a.s.l. Subsequent notices that day stated that ash continued to be detected, and then dissipated. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


30 March-5 April 2011

KVERT reported that during 25 March-1 April seismic data at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,100 ft) a.s.l. A thermal anomaly on the lava dome was observed in satellite imagery during 25-29 March, and ash plumes drifted 57 km SE on 26 March. Ground-based observers noted that ash-and-gas plumes rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. during 25-30 March.

Based on information from KEMSD and analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 5 April an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 7.6 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N. A possible eruption detected in satellite imagery the next day produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 March-29 March 2011

KVERT reported that during 18-25 March seismic data at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l. A thermal anomaly on the lava dome was observed daily in satellite imagery, and ash plumes drifted 373 km SE and N during 18-20 March. Ground-based observers noted that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 22 March. The Tokyo VAAC reported that on 23 March an eruption detected in satellite imagery and reported by KEMSD produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. Subsequent notices that day stated that ash then dissipated. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


16 March-22 March 2011

KVERT reported that during 11-18 March seismic data at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to altitudes of 3.8-8 km (12,500-26,200 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed ash plumes drifting 312 km W and NW on 10 and 16 March, and thermal anomalies on the lava dome during 12-13 and 15-16 March. According to ground-based observations, an ash plume rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. on 16 March. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. The Tokyo VAAC reported that on 19 March a possible eruption detected in satellite imagery produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. Subsequent notices that day stated that ash continued to be detected, and then dissipated.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


9 March-15 March 2011

KVERT reported that during 4-11 March seismic data at Shiveluch indicated that possible ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4-7.5 km (13,100-24,600 ft) a.s.l. A thermal anomaly over the lava dome was observed in satellite imagery during 5-7 March.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 March-8 March 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 25 February-4 March. Gas-and-steam activity was observed during 24-25 February; cloud cover prevented observations on the other days. A thermal anomaly over the lava dome was observed in satellite imagery during 25-26 February, and 2 March. Ash plumes drifted over 140 km N during 26-27 February. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 February-1 March 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 18-25 February. A thermal anomaly over the lava dome was observed daily in satellite imagery. Gas and steam activity was observed during 21-24 February and ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. during 22-23 February. Ash plumes observed in satellite imagery drifted more than 220 km SE at altitudes below 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. during 23-24 February. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 February-22 February 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 11-18 February. A thermal anomaly over the lava dome was observed daily in satellite imagery. Gas and steam activity was observed on 13 and 16 February. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. The Tokyo VAAC reported that on 22 February a possible eruption detected in satellite imagery produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 3.4 km (11,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE. Subsequent notices that day stated that ash had dissipated.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


9 February-15 February 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was recorded at Shiveluch during 4-11 February and many volcanic earthquakes were detected. A thermal anomaly over the lava dome was observed in satellite imagery. Ash plumes observed from the ground rose to an altitude of 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. on 4 February. That same day ash plumes detected in satellite imagery drifted 120 km E. Gas-and-steam activity was observed during 4 and 6-7 February. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 February-8 February 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity was detected at Shiveluch during 28 January-4 February and many volcanic earthquakes were detected. A thermal anomaly over the lava dome was observed in satellite imagery. Gas and steam activity was occasionally observed. Ash plumes were seen rising to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 30 January and 3 February. Ash plumes observed in satellite imagery drifted 120 km NE during 31 Janaury-1 February, and rose to altitudes of 6-8 km (19,700-26,200 ft) a.s.l. on 1 February. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

The Tokyo VAAC reported that on 8 February a possible eruption detected in satellite imagery produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. Subsequent notices that day stated that ash had dissipated.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


26 January-1 February 2011

KVERT reported that during 21-28 January moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was recorded, and an intense thermal anomaly over the volcano was detected in satellite imagery. Gas-and-steam emissions were visually observed during 23-26 January and an ash plume was observed rising to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on 26 January. Satellite imagery showed an ash plume drifting 54 km S on 26 January. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

The Tokyo VAAC reported that on 31 January and 1 February possible eruptions detected in satellite imagery produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 3.4-3.7 km (11,000-12,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE. Subsequent notices on both days stated that ash had dissipated.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


19 January-25 January 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was recorded during 14-21 January. Moderate gas-and-steam activity was visually observed during 17-20 January, and on 18 January an ash plume was observed rising to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. A bright thermal anomaly over the volcano was detected in satellite imagery during 13-15 and 18-20 January. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 January-18 January 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 7-13 January. A bright thermal anomaly over the lava dome was observed in satellite imagery during 7-11 January. Visual observations during 7-9 and 13 January, when the weather did not obscure the volcano, showed steam-and-gas activity. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 18 January an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


5 January-11 January 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 31 December-7 January. A bright thermal anomaly over the volcano was observed daily in satellite imagery. Seismic data showed that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. on 2 January. That same day an explosion generated ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 8 km (26,000 ft) a.s.l. and were observed in satellite imagery drifting 92 km S. Moderate gas-and-steam activity was visually observed during 2 and 5-6 January. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 December-4 January 2011

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 24-30 December. Ash explosions on 24 December produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes as high as 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. A bright thermal anomaly over the volcano was observed in satellite imagery during 24 and 27-28 December. Moderate gas-and-steam activity was visually observed on 24 and 28 December. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 December-28 December 2010

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 17-24 December. A bright thermal anomaly over the volcano was observed in satellite imagery. Moderate gas-and-steam activity was visually observed during 19-20 and 23 December. Ash explosions on 23 December produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes as high as 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 December-21 December 2010

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 10-17 December and a bright thermal anomaly was observed in satellite imagery. Seismic data analysis suggested that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,100 ft) a.s.l. Strong gas-and-steam activity was observed during 9 and 11-14 December. On 14 December, an ash explosion produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. and a 2-km-long pyroclastic flow. Satellite imagery showed an ash plume that drifted 230 km NE. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


8 December-14 December 2010

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 3-10 December. A bright thermal anomaly over the volcano was observed in satellite imagery. Plumes composed of either gas and steam or ash were seen in satellite imagery drifting 322 km SE on 3 December. Seismic data analyses on 6 December suggested that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. Gas-and-steam activity was observed visually during 3, 6, and 8-9 December. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery and information from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 14 December an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


1 December-7 December 2010

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 26 November-3 December. A bright thermal anomaly over the volcano was observed in satellite imagery. Strong gas-and-steam activity was observed on 26 and 29 November. Satellite images showed ash plumes drifting 153 km N and NE during 29-30 November, as well as several ash clouds (as large as 81 by 16 km) at distances as far as 351 km N and NE. Seismic data analysis suggested that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. on 1 December. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 November-30 November 2010

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 19-26 November, suggesting that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.8 km (12,500 ft) a.s.l. A bright thermal anomaly over the volcano was observed in satellite imagery. Ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l. and strong gas-and-steam activity were observed on 19, 20, 22, and 24 November. Ash plumes observed in satellite imagery drifted 408 km E and S during 19-20 and 23-24 November. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 30 November an eruption produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 November-23 November 2010

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 12-19 November, suggesting that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. Two distinct thermal anomalies over the volcano observed in satellite imagery showed the hot lava dome and recent pyroclastic flow deposits from an eruption on 27 October. During 11-14 November, satellite imagery showed ash plumes drifting 100 km N and E, and ash clouds with dimensions as large as 60 by 32 km. Gas-and-steam activity was observed during 16-18 November; cloud cover prevented visual observations the other days. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery and information from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 19-21 and 23 November eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.6-5.2 km (15,000-17,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE, E, and SE

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 November-16 November 2010

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 5-12 November and a large thermal anomaly over the volcano was observed in satellite imagery. Seismic data suggested that possible ash plumes rose to altitudes of 6.5 and 7 km (21,300 and 23,000 ft) a.s.l. on 6 and 8 November, respectively. Ash plumes were detected in satellite imagery during 7-9 November drifting 150 km SE. An ash plume observed on 10 November rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. KVERT noted that growth of the lava dome continued. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

During 13-14 November, the Tokyo VAAC reported that ash plumes from eruptions were observed in satellite imagery drifting E at altitudes of 4.6-5.2 km (15,000-17,000 ft) a.s.l. A possible eruption on 16 November produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


3 November-9 November 2010

KVERT reported that moderate seismic activity from Shiveluch was detected during 29 October-5 November and a thermal anomaly over the volcano was observed in satellite imagery. Seismic data on 31 October, and 1 and 4 November suggested that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed ash plumes drifting 400 km SE on 31 October and 1 November. Fumarolic activity was seen during 1-2 November. Cloud cover prevented observations the other days.

On 1 November, pyroclastic flow deposits from the large explosive eruption on 27 October were detected in satellite imagery on the ESE flank, and had traveled 15 km. Volcanologists inspected the deposits the next day and found that the pyroclastic flow had annihilated a forest in the Bekesh River valley. More than half of the lava dome edifice was destroyed during the eruption. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

During 4-9 November, the Tokyo VAAC reported that ash plumes from possible eruptions were observed in satellite imagery drifting N, SE, and S at altitudes of km (15,000-25,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


27 October-2 November 2010

KVERT reported that seismic activity from Shiveluch began to increase on 27 October. The magnitude of volcanic tremor then sharply increased on 28 October, indicating a strong explosive eruption. Cloud cover prevented observations of the volcano, but ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. Ash fell in Ust-Kamchatsk, 85 km SE, a few hours later. The road from Ust-Kamchatsk to Kliuchi, 50 km SW, closed due to poor visibility and darkness. Satellite images indicated that the ash plume rose to an altitude of 12 km (39,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. The Aviation Color Code level was raised to Red. According to news articles, ash from Shiveluch and Kliuchevskoi caused area flight diversions.

On 29 October satellite imagery showed the ash plume drifting 2,500 km E; ash continued to fall in Ust-Kamchatsk. Ash explosions continued on 30 October. Seismic data suggested that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE. The Aviation Color Code level was lowered to Orange. Based on analyses of satellite imagery and information from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that possible eruptions on 31 October and during 1-2 November produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 3.7-6.7 km (12,000-22,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE and E. Subsequent notices on 31 October and 1 November stated that ash had dissipated.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Associated Press


20 October-26 October 2010

KVERT reported that seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels during 14-16 October and at background levels during 17-22 October. Seismic data on 14 October suggested that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.8 km (12,500 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery analyses showed a daily thermal anomaly on the volcano and ash plumes that drifted 72 km SE on 15 and 16 October. Gas-and-steam plumes sometimes containing ash were observed during 15-18 October. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 October-19 October 2010

KVERT reported that during 8-15 October seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, suggesting that possible ash plumes rose to altitudes of 5.2-6 km (17,100-19,700 ft) a.s.l. Gas-and-steam plumes sometimes containing ash were periodically observed. Satellite imagery analyses showed a daily thermal anomaly on the volcano and ash plumes that drifted 130 km SE during 9-10 October. Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported a possible eruption on 16 October. Subsequent notices stated that ash was present, but had dissipated. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 October-12 October 2010

KVERT reported that during 1-8 October seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, suggesting that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. during 5-7 October. Satellite imagery analysis showed a thermal anomaly on the volcano and gas-and-steam plumes that drifted 190 km SE on 2 and 3 October. Gas-and-steam plumes sometimes containing ash were visually observed during 3-7 October. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 September-5 October 2010

KVERT reported that during 24 September-1 October seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes rose from the volcano. Gas-and-steam plumes were observed during 23, 25, and 28-29 September. Satellite imagery analyses showed a daily thermal anomaly on the volcano and gas-and-steam plumes that drifted 70 km SE on 29 September. Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported a possible eruption on 3 October; a subsequent notice stated that ash had dissipated. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 September-28 September 2010

KVERT reported that during 17-24 September seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery analysis showed a thermal anomaly on the volcano. Gas-and-ash plumes were observed on 21 September, and satellite imagery showed ash plumes drifting 16 km SE the same day. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 September-21 September 2010

KVERT reported that during 10-17 September seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery analysis showed a thermal anomaly on the volcano. Gas-and-ash plumes were observed during 12-15 September; clouds prevented observations on the other days. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


8 September-14 September 2010

KVERT reported that during 3-10 September seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. during 3-4 September. Gas-and-ash plumes were observed on 6 and 7 September; clouds prevented observations on the other days. Satellite imagery analysis showed a thermal anomaly on the volcano during the week. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


1 September-7 September 2010

KVERT reported that during 27 August-3 September seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, suggesting that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery analysis showed a thermal anomaly on the volcano. Gas-and-ash plumes were observed during 27-30 August. Based on information from KEMSD and satellite imagery analyses, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 2-3 September eruptions produced plumes that rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 August-31 August 2010

KVERT reported that during 20-27 August seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, suggesting that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8.5 km (27,900 ft) a.s.l. during 20-24 August. Gas-and-ash plumes were observed on 20 and 21 August. Satellite imagery analysis showed a thermal anomaly on the volcano during 20-22 and 24 August. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 August-24 August 2010

KVERT reported that during 13-20 August seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and gas-and-steam plumes were seen during 14-16 August. A daily thermal anomaly was seen in satellite imagery. Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 22-23 August eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 6.4-8.5 km (21,000-28,000 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 August-17 August 2010

KVERT reported that during 6-13 August seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, suggesting that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. on 9 August and to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. the other days. Cloud cover prevented visual observations. Satellite imagery analysis showed a daily thermal anomaly on the volcano and an ash plume that drifted 55 km NW on 10 August. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 August-10 August 2010

KVERT reported that during 30 July-6 August seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Gas-and-steam plumes were seen rising to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. during 29-31 July. Cloud cover prevented observations the other days. Satellite imagery analysis showed a large daily thermal anomaly on the volcano. Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption on 9 August produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


28 July-3 August 2010

KVERT reported that during 23-30 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and a daily thermal anomaly was detected in satellite imagery. Possible ash plumes from hot avalanches and explosions on 28 and 29 July rose to altitudes of 4-6.5 km (13,100-21,300 ft) a.s.l. Gas-and-steam plumes were seen rising to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on 23 and 24 July. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 July-27 July 2010

KVERT reported that during 16-23 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating weak ash explosions from the lava dome. According to visual observations, gas-and-steam plumes rose daily to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,100 ft) a.s.l. and ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. on 20 and 21 July. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome and ash plumes that drifted 50 km NE on 21 July. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 July-20 July 2010

KVERT reported that during 9-16 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (12,100 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Gas-and-steam plumes were seen rising to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,100 ft) a.s.l. during 9 and 11-14 July. Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported a possible eruption on 19 July. Ash was seen in subsequent satellite images and then later dissipated. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 July-13 July 2010

KVERT reported that during 2-9 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that on most days possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7 km (22,900 ft) a.s.l. On 5 July ash plumes from hot avalanches rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. and strong fumarolic activity was noted. Ashfall was observed around the volcano. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome and an ash plume that drifted 20 km S on 7 July. Tokyo VAAC reported that satellite imagery analyses indicated a possible eruption on 10 July. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


30 June-6 July 2010

KVERT reported that during 24 June-2 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes occasionally rose to an altitude of 6.6 km (21,600 ft) a.s.l. On 24 and 29 June ash plumes from hot avalanches rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Strong fumarolic activity was also noted on these days. On 1 July, seismicity increased and may have indicated ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8 km (26,200 ft) a.s.l. Ashfall was reported in Klyuchi village, 50 km SW. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from Yelizovo Airport (UHPP), the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 3 July an ash plume rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N. Satellite imagery showed a possible eruption the next day. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 June-29 June 2010

KVERT reported that during 18-25 June seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.1 km (16,700 ft) a.s.l. Strong fumarolic activity and hot avalanches were observed during 21-23 June. An ash plume was seen rising to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. on 23 June. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome and an ash cloud 5 x 5 km in dimension 30 km SE on 23 June. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 June-22 June 2010

KVERT reported that during 11-18 June seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,100 ft) a.s.l. Strong fumarolic activity and hot avalanches were seen on most days. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome, and a small anomaly near the lava dome on 15 June. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 June-15 June 2010

KVERT reported that during 4-11 June seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and hot avalanches were seen at night. The seismic data suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.1 km (13,400 ft) a.s.l. during 3-4 and 6 June. Ash plumes were seen during 4-6 and 9 June rising to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted 100 km SE on 4 June. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 June-8 June 2010

KVERT reported that during 28 May-4 June seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, suggesting that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. Strong fumarolic activity was also noted and, at night, hot avalanches were seen. Ash plumes observed throughout the reporting period rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly. Gas-and-steam plumes seen in imagery drifted 30 km W on 29 May, and an ash cloud 20 by 6 km in dimension was detected about 15 km N on 31 May. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 May-1 June 2010

KVERT reported that during 21-28 May seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, suggesting that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.7 km (15,400 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery showed a large daily thermal anomaly, and an ash plume that drifted 10 km NE on 23 May. Observations revealed fumarolic activity, and ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. on 24 and 25 May. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 May-25 May 2010

KVERT reported that during 14-21 May seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, suggesting that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.1 km (16,700 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. An ash plume drifted about 40 km SE on 15 May and gas-and-steam plumes drifted the same distance NE on 18 May. Based on information from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 24 May an ash plume rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


12 May-18 May 2010

KVERT reported that during 7-14 May seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8.3 km (27,200 ft) a.s.l. on most days. Gas-and-steam plumes were sometimes seen rising to an altitude of 3.2 km (10,500 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 May-11 May 2010

KVERT reported that during 30 April-7 May seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted about 18 km W on 3 May. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 April-4 May 2010

KVERT reported that during 23-30 April seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and suggested that possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.7 km (18,700 ft) a.s.l. During 22-25 April ash plumes from hot avalanches rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and fumarolic activity from the lava dome was noted. Satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted about 60 km SE on 28 April. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 April-27 April 2010

KVERT reported that during 16-23 April seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and ash plumes from hot avalanches rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. Seismic data suggested that ash plumes rose 4-6.9 km (13,100-22,600 ft) a.s.l. during 15-17 and 20-21 April. An ash explosion on 18 April generated an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted about 50-220 km SE on 18, 20, and 21 April. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 April-20 April 2010

KVERT reported that during 9-15 April seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Seismic data suggested that ash plumes rose to about 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. on 8 April and up to 5.6 km (18,400 ft) a.s.l. the other days of the week. Ash plumes from hot avalanches were seen rising to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,100 ft) a.s.l. during 9-13 April. Satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome and a gas-and-steam plume that drifted about 75 km E on 13 April. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 April-13 April 2010

KVERT reported that during 2-9 April seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Ash plumes from hot avalanches rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. on 5 and 8 April. Satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted about 100 km SE on 5 April. The Tokyo VAAC reported that on 10 April ash plumes were seen in satellite imagery. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


31 March-6 April 2010

KVERT reported that during 26 March-2 April seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 4.7 km (15,400 ft) a.s.l. Hot avalanches from the lava dome were seen at night. Satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted about 40 km SE on 29 March. Based on information from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 5 April an ash plume rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 March-30 March 2010

KVERT reported that during 19-29 March seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 4.2 km (13,800 ft) a.s.l. Hot avalanches from the lava dome were seen at night. On 22 March, seismic signals detected an explosion that may have produced an ash plume rising to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. Satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the volcano, and ash plumes that drifted over 40 km NE on 21 March. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 March-23 March 2010

KVERT reported that during 12-19 March seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. Hot avalanches were seen at night. Gas-and-steam plumes sometimes containing ash were seen on 12, 13, 15, and 16 March; plumes seen in satellite imagery on 13 and 16 March drifted 90 km E and SE. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. Based on information from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 21 March an ash plume rose to an altitude of 2.7 km (9,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 March-16 March 2010

KVERT reported that during 5-12 March seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 6.4 km (21,000 ft) a.s.l. Gas-and-steam plumes sometimes containing ash were seen daily, rising to altitudes of 2.5-3.5 km (8,200-11,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifting 130 km ESE; an ash plume rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. on 10 March. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 March-9 March 2010

KVERT reported that during 26 February-5 March seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was occasionally observed. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted 30 km NE on 26 February and 130 km SE on 28 February. Ash fell in Klyuchi, 50 km SW, on 26 February. On 3 March, a second thermal anomaly on the S flank was noted. Based on information from KVERT and analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 5 and 8-9 March ash plumes rose to an altitude of 2.7 km (9,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and SE. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 February-2 March 2010

KVERT reported that during 19-26 February seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was occasionally observed. Ash and snow fell simultaneously in Klyuchi, 50 km SW, on 21 February. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted 30 km to the N and E on 23 and 25 February, respectively. Gas-and-steam plumes drifted 60 km N during 18 and 22-25 February. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange. Based on information from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 26 February an ash plume rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 February-23 February 2010

KVERT reported that during 12-19 February seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 5.1 km (16,700 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was occasionally observed. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome and ash plumes that drifted over 70 km in northern directions on 11, 13, and 17 February. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange. Based on information from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 23 February an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 February-16 February 2010

KVERT reported that during 5-12 February seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,100 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was occasionally observed. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 February-9 February 2010

KVERT reported that during 29 January-5 February seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 5.7 km (18,700 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was observed on 1 February; cloud cover prevented observations on other days. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 January-2 February 2010

KVERT reported that during 22-29 January seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,100 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was occasionally observed. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 29-30 January eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.9-5.8 km (16,000-19,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 January-26 January 2010

KVERT reported that during 15-22 January seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 4.7 km (15,400 ft) a.s.l. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 23-24 and 26 January eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 3-4.6 km (10,000-15,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 January-19 January 2010

KVERT reported that during 8-15 January seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 6.2 km (20,300 ft) a.s.l. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome and an ash plume that drifted 8 km SW on 13 January. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 18 January an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 January-12 January 2010

KVERT reported that during 1-8 January seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was occasionally seen when the weather was clear. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome and a gas-and-steam plume that drifted 40 km SW on 6 January. Ashfall was reported in Klyuchi (about 45 km SW) on 4 January. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD and analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 6-11 January eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.3-6.4 km (14,000-21,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


30 December-5 January 2010

KVERT reported that during 24-31 December seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was occasionally seen when the weather was clear. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome and an ash plume that drifted 15 km W on 28 December. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD and KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 30 December-3 January eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.3-7.6 km (14,000-25,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 December-29 December 2009

KVERT reported that during 18-25 December seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 4.1 km (13,500 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was occasionally seen when the weather was clear. A video camera recorded an ash plume on 22 December. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 27-29 December eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.9-5.2 km (16,000-17,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


16 December-22 December 2009

KVERT reported that during 11-21 December seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 December-15 December 2009

KVERT reported that during 4-11 December seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating ash plumes rising to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was seen with a video camera. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome and an ash plume drifting 85 km SE on 6 December. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 13 December an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


2 December-8 December 2009

KVERT reported that during 27 November-4 December seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was seen with a video camera. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome and gas-and-steam plumes, possibly with ash, drifting 70 km E on 27, 28, and 30 November. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 4 December an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 November-1 December 2009

KVERT reported that during 20-27 November seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,100 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was seen using a video camera. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 November-24 November 2009

KVERT reported that during 13-20 November seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.3 km (17,400 ft) a.s.l. According to video camera data, fumarolic activity and hot avalanches were noted on 14 and 15 November. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 18 November an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 November-17 November 2009

KVERT reported that during 6-13 November seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels, possibly indicating that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. According to video camera data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.2 km (13,800 ft) a.s.l. on 5 November and hot avalanches were noted during 10-12 November. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and ash plumes that drifted 320 km E on 11 November. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD and analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 14 November an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 November-10 November 2009

KVERT reported that during 30 October-6 November seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and possibly indicated that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.7 km (15,400 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was noted and analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large thermal anomaly over the lava dome. According to video camera data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8 km (26,400 ft) a.s.l. on 30 October. Ash plumes seen on satellite imagery drifted 130-255 km E on 30 October, and 1 and 5 November. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 October-3 November 2009

KVERT reported that during 23-30 October seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and possibly indicated that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,100 ft) a.s.l. and to an altitude of 6.9 km (22,600 ft) a.s.l. on 29 October. Fumarolic activity was occasionally seen. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large thermal anomaly over the lava dome during 22-27 October and an ash plume that drifted 24 km NE on 26 October. Based on information from KEMSD and analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 30 October an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. A possible eruption plume rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. later that day. On 1 November, an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 October-27 October 2009

KVERT reported that during 16-23 October seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and possibly indicated that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large thermal anomaly over the lava dome. According to video camera data and visual observations, multiple hot avalanches traveled down the lava dome. Deposits on the SE flank from a small pyroclastic flow were noted. Fumarolic plumes rose to altitudes of 2.8-5 km (9,200-16,400 ft) a.s.l. during 16, 18-20, and 22 October. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 October-20 October 2009

KVERT reported that during 9-16 October seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels and possibly indicated that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large thermal anomaly over the lava dome during 8-13 and 15 October. Fumarolic plumes containing small amounts of ash rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. during 11-13 October. According to video camera data and visual observations, multiple hot avalanches traveled down the lava dome on 12, 13, and 14 October, and deposits from a small pyroclastic flow on the SE flank were noted. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 October-13 October 2009

KVERT reported that during 2-9 October seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. According to video camera data and visual observations, fumarolic plumes containing small amounts of ash rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. during 1-3 October. Based on interpretations of seismic data, possible ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.8 km (22,300 ft) a.s.l. on 6 October and to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. on other days. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 September-6 October 2009

KVERT reported that during 25 September-2 October seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Fumarolic activity was occasionally seen. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. on 27 September and to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. on other days. According to video camera data and visual observations, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on 28 September. An ash plume was seen on satellite imagery drifting 65 km ESE on 29 September. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 September-29 September 2009

KVERT reported that during 18-25 September seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,100 ft) a.s.l. According to video camera data and visual observations, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. on 18, 19, and 22 September, and hot avalanches from the lava dome were noted during 18 and 22-23 September. Ash plumes were occasionally seen drifting 15-70 km N, NW, and SE. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 28 September an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


16 September-22 September 2009

KVERT reported that during 11-18 September seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 7.1 km (23,300 ft) a.s.l. On 13 September, pyroclastic flow deposits 5 km long were seen on the S part of the lava dome. Fumarolic activity was seen during 13 and 16-17 September, and hot avalanches originated from the lava dome were seen at night on 16 and 17 September. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 19 September eruptions produced plumes that rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


9 September-15 September 2009

KVERT reported that during 4-11 September seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 4.2 km (13,800 ft) a.s.l. and hot avalanches occurred at the lava dome. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. during 4-9 September. An ash plume was seen in satellite imagery drifting 80 km E on 8 September.

On 11 September, KVERT reported strong explosions. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to an altitude greater than 15 km (49,200 ft) a.s.l. The seismic network then detected eight minutes of pyroclastic flows from the lava dome; resulting plumes rose to an altitude of approximately 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code level was raised to Red. Ten more events characterized as ash explosions and either pyroclastic flows or avalanches were detected. Cloud cover prevented visual observations. Seismicity decreased during 11-12 September, and indicated that ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4.5-6.5 km (14,800-21,300 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code level was lowered to Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 September-8 September 2009

KVERT reported that during 28 August-4 September seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,100 ft) a.s.l. and hot avalanches occurred at the lava dome. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to an altitude of 3 km (9,800 ft) a.s.l. during 28-29 and 31 August, and1-3 September. The Aviation Color Code level remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 August-1 September 2009

KVERT reported that during 21-27 August seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 4.8 km (15,700 ft) a.s.l. and hot avalanches occurred on the lava dome. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to an altitude of 3.3 km (10,800 ft) a.s.l. during 20-23 and 26-27 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 31 August eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.6-5.5 km (15,000-18,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


19 August-25 August 2009

KVERT reported that during 14-24 August seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 5.9 km (19,400 ft) a.s.l. and hot avalanches occurred at the lava dome. An ash plume drifted 50 km S on 14 August, and gas-and-steam plumes rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on 16 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 August-18 August 2009

KVERT reported that during 7-17 August seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 August-11 August 2009

KVERT reported that during 31 July-7 August seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. Steam-and-gas plumes with some ash content were also noted. According to video camera data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on 2 August; gas-and-steam plumes rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. on 2 and 4 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery and information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 6 and 9 August eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.6-5.2 km (15,000-17,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 July-4 August 2009

KVERT reported that during 24-31 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. Steam-and-gas plumes with some ash content were also noted. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. According to video camera data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. on 23 and 27 July; gas-and-steam plumes rose to an altitude of 2.7 km (8,900 ft) a.s.l. on 24 and 27 July. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery and information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 1-2 August eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 3-5.8 km (10,000-19,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and NE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 July-28 July 2009

KVERT reported that during 17-18 and 20-24 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. During 17-20 and 22 July, gas-and-steam plumes seen on a video camera rose to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,100 ft) a.s.l. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. on 20, 21, and 22 July, and steam-and-gas plumes with some ash content were noted on other days. Analyses of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome, and steam plumes that drifted as far away as 40 km on 18 and 20 July. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery and information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 23-24 and 27-28 July eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.6-6.1 km (15,000-20,000 ft) a.s.l. According to news sources, an ash plume rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. late on 25 July. Increased seismicity, powerful ash bursts, and avalanches were also reported.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), RIA Novosti


15 July-21 July 2009

KVERT reported that during 10-17 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. On 14 July, a gas-and-steam plume seen on a video camera rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. during 10, 13-14, and 16 July, and steam-and-gas plumes with some ash content were emitted during the reporting period. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome, and a steam plume that drifted 19 km SW on 13 July. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange. Based on analyses of satellite imagery and information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 17 July an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


8 July-14 July 2009

KVERT reported that during 3-10 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 5.3 km (13,400 ft) a.s.l. on 2 and 4 July, and steam-and-gas plumes with some ash content were emitted during the reporting period. On 3 July, a gas-and-steam plume seen on a video camera rose to an altitude of 3.3 km (10,800 ft) a.s.l. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


1 July-7 July 2009

KVERT reported that during 25 June-3 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Pyroclastic flows were noted on 25 and 26 June. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 8.1 km (26,600 ft) a.s.l. during 25-30 June, and steam-and-gas plumes with some ash content were emitted during the reporting period. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome and ash plumes that drifted 97 km NE on 26 June. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange. Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 3 and 5 July eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.9-5.5 km (16,000-18,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 June-30 June 2009

KVERT reported that during 19-26 June seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Based on interpretations of seismic data, steam-and-gas plumes with some ash content were emitted during the reporting period; ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 6.8 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. On 20 June, ash plumes seen on a video camera rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. Gas-and-steam activity was observed at other times during the reporting period. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. Ash plumes were also seen on satellite imagery drifting 114 km S during 20 and 22-24 June and more than 100 km SW and NE on 25 June. A pyroclastic flow occurred on 25 June. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange. Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 27-28 and 30 June eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.9-7 km (16,000-23,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 June-23 June 2009

A new viscous lava flow from the lava dome was reported by KVERT during 11-18 June. Satellite thermal data indicated a large anomaly over the lava dome the entire week. Above-background levels of seismicity persisted throughout that time. Video recordings revealed ash plumes up to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l on 12-15 and 18 June. Ash plumes extended up to 50 km (31 miles) to the south 11 and 13-14 June. Another ash cloud on 12 June was 40 x 20 km in size at a distance of 140 km (87 miles) SW. Moderate to strong gas-and-steam plumes were observed during other times.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 June-16 June 2009

KVERT reported that during 5-11 June seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Based on interpretations of seismic data, diffuse ash plumes were emitted during the reporting period; ash plumes possibly rose to altitudes of 4.8-7.7 km (16,000-25,300 ft) a.s.l. during 6 and 10-11 June. Video camera images showed steam-and-gas emissions. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome, and ash plumes that drifted 90 km S on 6 and 7 June. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange. Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 11-12 and 14-15 June eruptions produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 6.1-7.9 km (20,000-26,000 ft) a.s.l. A possible eruption was seen on satellite imagery on 13 June.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


3 June-9 June 2009

KVERT reported that during 29 May-5 June seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Based on interpretations of seismic data, diffuse ash plumes were emitted during the reporting period; an ash plume possibly rose to an altitude of 3.8 km (12,500 ft) a.s.l. on 1 June. Video camera images showed steam-and-gas emissions. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange. Based on analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported on 7 June that a possible eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 3.4 km (11,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW. A report a few hours later stated that ash emissions were continuing.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


27 May-2 June 2009

KVERT reported that during 22-29 May seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. Steam-and-gas emissions were seen during 21-23 May. Based on video camera views, gas-and-steam plumes containing a small amount of ash rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on 22 May. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 May-26 May 2009

KVERT reported that during 15-22 May seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. A hot avalanche seen on a video camera on 16 May produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. During 17-18 May, observers reported active fumaroles. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes were likely present during the reporting period; a possible ash plume rose to an altitude of 5.3 km (17,400 ft) a.s.l. on 21 May. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 May-19 May 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 8-15 May. Based on interpretations of seismic data, occasional ash plumes likely rose to an altitude of 5.4 km (17,700 ft) a.s.l. On 13 May, an ash plume generated by a hot avalanche was seen on video and rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly from the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 May-12 May 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 1-8 May. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly from the lava dome every day. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 April-5 May 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 28 April-1 May. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to altitudes of 5-6 km (16,400-19,700 ft) a.s.l. During 29-30 April, observers reported active fumaroles. Ash plumes generated by hot avalanches rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed an intense thermal anomaly on the lava dome every day. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption on 5 May produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 April-28 April 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 17-24 April. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to altitudes of 4.5-5.3 km (14,800-17,400 ft) a.s.l. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. According to observers, fumaroles were active during 16-22 and 22 April. A hot avalanche produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on 22 April.

On 25 April, increased seismicity indicated that an ash plume rose to an altitude of 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. On 26 April, seismicity remained at high levels; continuous spasmodic tremor and a series of weak shallow earthquakes occurred. An ash explosion from the lava dome was seen on video camera. Ash emitted from a large fissure on the S flank of the lava dome produced plumes that rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted ESE. The Level of Concern Color Code was raised to Red. The next day, seismicity decreased slightly but remained elevated and gas-and-steam emissions with some ash content emanated from the fissure. Based on video camera views and analysis of satellite imagery, plumes rose to altitudes of 3.5-5 km (11,500-16,400 ft) a.s.l. during 27-28 April and drifted 250 km NE. On 28 April, pyroclastic flows originated from areas near the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code was lowered to Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 April-21 April 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 10-17 April. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to altitudes of 4.5-7.5 km (14,800-24,600 ft) a.s.l. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and ash plumes that drifted about 50 km NW on 13 April. According to observers, fumaroles were active on 15 and 16 April. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange. Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruptions on 19 and 22 April produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.6-5.2 km (15,000-17,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


8 April-14 April 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 3-10 April. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to an altitude of 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. during 3-5 and 8-9 April. According to observers, fumaroles were active during 3-7 and 9 April. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruptions during 11-14 April produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.6-5.5 km (15,000-18,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


1 April-7 April 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels 27 March-3 April. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. According to observers, fumaroles were active daily and explosions produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 31 March. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and an ash plume that drifted 80 km S on 1 April. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 March-31 March 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 20-27 March. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. According to observers, fumaroles were active during 23-26 March and explosions produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 8 km (26,200 ft) a.s.l. on 24 March. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and an ash plume that drifted 40 km S on 25 March. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruptions during 27-28 March produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.3-5.5 km (14,000-18,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 March-24 March 2009

KVERT reported that during 13-20 March seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 12-14 and 16-19 March. Strong fumarolic activity was seen on 13, 14, and 18 March and incandescence from the lava dome was seen at night on 14 and 18 March. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 March-17 March 2009

KVERT reported that during 6-13 March seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels and strong fumarolic activity was seen. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to an altitude of 6.2 km (20,300 ft) a.s.l. Incandescence from the lava dome was seen at night. According to observers, ash plumes from hot avalanches rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE during 9-10 March. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and ash plumes that drifted about 175 km SE during 7 and 10-11 March. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 March-10 March 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 27 February-6 March. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to an altitude of 5.4 km (17,700 ft) a.s.l. According to observers, fumaroles were active during 28 February and 3-5 March. Ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.7 km (15,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE during 3-4 March. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and an ash plume that drifted 84 km E on 4 March. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruptions on 8 and 10 March produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 6.1-6.4 km (20,000-21,000 ft) a.s.l. Plumes drifted SE on 10 March.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 February-3 March 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was at background levels during 21-28 February. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. Lava flows continued to be active on the S and N flanks. Fumarolic activity was seen during 20-21 and 23-25 February. During 24-25 February, pilots reported dark plumes near the volcano that rose to altitudes of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and an ash plume that drifted 40 km NNE on 25 February. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruptions on 25 February and 4 March produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.9-5.8 km (16,000-19,000 ft) a.s.l. The plumes drifted W on 25 February.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 February-24 February 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was at background levels during 13-20 February. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,100 ft) a.s.l. Lava flows continued to be active on the S and N flanks. Fumarolic activity was seen during 12-13 and 19 February. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and an ash plume that drifted 31 km NW on 17 February. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption on 18 February produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 February-17 February 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 6-13 February. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to altitudes of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. Lava flows continued to be active on the S and N flanks. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 6 and 8-10 February; clouds prevented observations on the other days during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption on 12 February produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 February-10 February 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 30 January-6 February. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes likely rose to altitudes of 5.3 km (17,400 ft) a.s.l. Lava flows continued to be active on the S and N flanks. Weak gas-and-steam activity was noted on 30 January and 1 February. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a large thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 30 January-2 February, and on 5 February. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption on 7 February produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


28 January-3 February 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 22-30 January. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to altitudes of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. on 22 January and to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on the other days during the reporting period. Weak gas-and-steam activity was noted during 23-24 and 26-27 January. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruptions on 30 January and 1 February produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 4.9-5.5 km (16,000-18,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 January-27 January 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 16-23 January. Based on interpretations of seismic data, possible ash plumes rose to altitudes of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. on 17 and 21 January and to an altitude of 3 km (9,800 ft) a.s.l. on the other days during the reporting period. Gas-and-steam emissions were noted. On 21 January, an ash plume that was visible on a web camera rose to an altitude of about 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome, gas-and-steam plumes that drifted about 130 km SE, SW, and W during 16-17 and 19-20 January, and an ash plume that drifted 65 km SW on 18 January. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 January-20 January 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 9-16 January. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to altitudes of 7.3 km (23,900 ft) a.s.l. and 6.9 km (22,600 ft) a.s.l. on 9 and 14 January, respectively, and to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. on the other days during the reporting period. Observers reported that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. on 9 January and noted gas-and-steam activity during 8-10 and 12-14 January. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly over the lava dome and gas-and-steam plumes that drifted about 70 km S, SE, and NE during 9-11 and 13 January. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 18 January an eruption produced a plume that rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 January-13 January 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 2-9 January. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8.8 km (28,900 ft) a.s.l. on 7 January and to an altitude of 5.7 km (18,700 ft) a.s.l. on the other days during the reporting period. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a large daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and an ash plume that drifted 25 km W on 6 January. Gas-and-steam emissions were seen on 2, 4, and 6 January. Ash deposits were noted in areas about 10 km SW on 7 January. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


31 December-6 January 2009

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 25 December-2 January. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. on 25 and 26 December, and to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. on the other days during the reporting period. An ash plume was seen on 25 December at an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. and gas-and-steam emissions were noted on 25 and 30 December, and on 1 January. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and an ash plume that drifted 40 km NW on 30 December. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 1, 2, 5, and 6 January eruptions produced plumes to altitudes of 4.6-5.8 km (15,000-19,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 December-30 December 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 19-26 December. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8.5 km (27,800 ft) a.s.l. on 19 and 20 December and to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. during 21-26 December. An ash plume was seen on 22 December at an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. and gas-and-steam emissions were noted on 23 and 24 December. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 26-27 and 30 December eruptions produced plumes to altitudes of 5.5-7 km (18,000-23,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 December-23 December 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 12-19 December. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. Visual observations of weak gas-and-steam emissions were noted during 12-14 and 18 December. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KVERT and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 21-22 December eruptions produced plumes to altitudes of 5.8-8.5 km (19,000-28,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 December-16 December 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 5-12 December. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. Visual observations of weak gas-and-steam emissions were noted during 5, 7, and 9-10 December. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 11 December eruptions produced plumes to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


3 December-9 December 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 28 November-5 December. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l. According to visual observations, gas-and-steam plumes rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. during 27 and 29-30 November, and 2 December. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 November-2 December 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 21-28 November. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.6 km (18,400 ft) a.s.l. Ashfall was reported in the town of Klyuchi, about 30 km SW, on 22 November. Visual observations confirmed that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. on 25 November. Fumarolic activity was visible on the web camera during 26-28 November. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and a gas-and-steam plume that drifted about 30 km SE on 26 November. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 1 December eruptions produced plumes to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


19 November-25 November 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 14-21 November. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was visible on the web camera on 16 and 17 November. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and a gas-and-steam plume that drifted about 100 km E on 14 November. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 22 and 24-25 November eruptions produced plumes to altitudes of 5.2-5.8 km (17,000-19,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


12 November-18 November 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 6-14 November. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.8 km (22,300 ft) a.s.l. Hot avalanches descended the lava dome on 6 November and produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. On 10 November, an ash plume drifted 30 km E and gas-and-steam plumes drifted 50 km. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange. Fumarolic activity was visible on the web camera on 8, 10, and 12 November.

Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 13 and 16 November eruptions produced plumes to altitudes of 4.9-6.1 km (16,000-20,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


5 November-11 November 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 31 October-7 November. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,100 ft) a.s.l. A large number of daily hot avalanches were observed descending the lava dome and producing ash plumes on 2, 3, and 5 November that rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity was visible on the web camera during 2-3 and 5-6 November. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome on 31 October and 1, 2, 3, and 6 November. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 8-10 November eruptions produced plumes to altitudes of 4.9-5.8 km (16,000-19,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 October-4 November 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 24-31 October. Based on interpretations of seismic data, a large number of hot avalanches were inferred to have descended the lava dome and produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,100 ft) a.s.l. Ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. were seen on 24 October. Fumarolic activity was visible on the web camera during 23-25 and 28-30 October. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 2 and 4 November eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 5.2 and 4.6 km (17,000 and 15,000 ft) a.s.l., respectively.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 October-28 October 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 17-24 October. Based on interpretations of seismic data, a large number of hot avalanches were inferred to have descended the lava dome and produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. Significant hot avalanches that produced ash plumes to altitudes of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. were seen on 16 and 20 October. Fumarolic activity was visible on the web camera during 17-20 and 22-23 October. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome, and ash plumes drifted 60 km E on 20 October. Ash plumes about 10 by 11 km and 10 by 5 km in horizontal dimensions drifted about 30-40 km SE on 19 and 22 October, respectively. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 October-21 October 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 10-17 October. Based on interpretations of seismic data, a large number of hot avalanches descended the lava dome and produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. Significant hot avalanches were seen on 13 October. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 10-11 and 13-14 October, and steam-and-ash plumes with a small amount of ash that drifted 30 km NE on 14 October. Fumarolic activity was visible on the web camera during 10-13 and 16-17 October. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD and analysis of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 18-20 October eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 4.9-6.7 km (16,000-22,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


8 October-14 October 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 3-10 October. Based on interpretations of seismic data, a large number of hot avalanches descended the lava dome and produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. Fumarolic activity and gas-and-steam plumes that rose to an approximate altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. were visible on the web camera during 2-5 and 7-9 October. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and steam-and-ash plumes that drifted 30 km N and E on 6 and 7 October.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


1 October-7 October 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 26 September-3 October. A large number of hot avalanches descended the lava dome and produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400 ft) a.s.l. On 28 September, an ash plume that was visible on a web camera rose to an altitude of about 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash explosions likely occurred on 28 September and 1 October and generated ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. Ashfall was reported in Klyuchi (about 45 km SW) on 1 October. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 28 September and 1-2 October. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 September-30 September 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 19-26 September. A large number of hot avalanches may have descended the lava dome and produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 3.6 km (11,800 ft) a.s.l. Fumaroles on the lava dome were active on 19 September. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. According to a news article, video cameras recorded an eruption that produced an ash plume on 26 September. The ash plume rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Itar-Tass News


17 September-23 September 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 12-19 September. Video camera data, analysis of seismic data, and visual observations showed that a small hot avalanche descended the SE side of the lava dome, producing an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 100 km NE. Fumaroles were active during 15-18 September; cloud cover prevented visual observations on other days. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 September-16 September 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 5-12 September. A large number of hot avalanches descended the lava dome; ash produced from one of the events rose to an altitude of 5.1 km (16,700 ft) a.s.l. on 10 September. Fumaroles were active during 10-11 September; cloud cover prevented visual observations on other days. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

According to a news article, a small collapse of the SW part of the lava dome on 13 September generated an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 100 km NE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Itar-Tass News


3 September-9 September 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 29 August-5 September. Gas-and-steam plumes with a small amount of ash were generated from avalanches on 29 and 30 August and rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 August-2 September 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 22-29 August. Gas-and-steam plumes with a small amount of ash were generated from avalanches during 22 and 25-28 August. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome and that steam-and-ash plumes drifted 80 km SE on 26 and 27 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 August-26 August 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 15-22 August. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome on 15, 18, and 21 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 August-19 August 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 8-15 August. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly on the lava dome. Based on information from KEMSD and observations of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 15 August an eruption plume rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 August-12 August 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 1-8 August, and possibly indicated that ash plumes from explosions rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,100 ft) a.s.l. on 6 August. Observations of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 1-3 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 July-5 August 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 25 July-1 August. According to visual observations, small hot avalanches occasionally descended the lava dome and fumaroles were active on 18 and 22 July. Observations of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome daily during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 July-29 July 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 18-25 July. Moderate fumarolic activity was seen on 18 and 22 July. Observations of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 18-22 July; clouds obscured views on other days. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 July-22 July 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 11-18 July and possibly indicated ash explosions up to 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. on 17 July. Moderate fumarolic activity was seen on 13 and 15 July. Observations of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 10-11 and 13-17 July. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 July-8 July 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch possibly indicated ash explosions on 26 June and was slightly above background levels during 26 June-4 July. Moderate fumarolic activity was seen on 29 June, and 1 and 3 July. Observations of satellite imagery revealed a strong thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 27-29 June and 1-3 July. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 June-1 July 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 20-27 June and possibly indicated ash explosions on 21, 22, and 25 June. According to video footage and visual observations, moderate fumarolic activity was noted on 24 and 25 June and an ash plume at an altitude of 4.2 km (13,800 ft) a.s.l. occurred on 25 June. Observations of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 19-20 and 23-25 June. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 June-24 June 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 13-20 June. According to video footage and visual observations, moderate fumarolic activity was noted on 13 June. Observations of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome during 12-13 June; clouds obscured views on other days. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 June-17 June 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was at background levels during 6-13 June. According to video footage and visual observations, moderate fumarolic activity was noted during 5-9 June. Observations of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly in the crater. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 June-10 June 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels on 29 and 30 May and at background levels during 31 May-6 June. Gas-and-ash explosions may have occurred on 29-30 May and 3 June, possibly sending plumes to an altitude of 3.6 km (11,800 ft) a.s.l. According to video footage and visual observations, moderate fumarolic activity was noted during 31 May and 1-5 June. Observations of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly in the crater, and a gas-and-steam plume that drifted 20 km WNW on 31 May. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 May-3 June 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 27-28 May and at background levels the other days during 23-30 May. Gas-and-ash explosions may have occurred on 22, 27, and 28 May and produced plumes to an altitude of 4.7 km (15,400 ft) a.s.l. According to video footage and visual observations, hot avalanches descended the lava dome and ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.6 km (11,800 ft) a.s.l. during 26-27 May. Fumarolic activity was noted during 23-27 May. Observations of satellite imagery revealed a daily thermal anomaly in the crater, and an ash-and-steam plume that drifted 17 km SW on 28 May. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 May-27 May 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was at background levels during 15-17 and 21 May and above background levels the other days during 16-23 May; gas-and-ash explosions may have occurred on 18, 19, and 20 May. According to video footage and visual observations, small hot avalanches descended the lava dome every day and fumarolic activity was noted. A large hot avalanche caused an ash plume to rise to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. on 20 May. The plume drifted E. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater daily and an ash-and-steam plume drifted more than 100 km SE on 20 May.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 May-20 May 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels on 12 and 14 May and at background levels the other days during 9-16 May; gas-and-ash explosions may have occurred on 14 May. During 9 and 11-15 May, hot avalanches descended the lava dome and fumarolic activity was noted. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater daily. During 11-13 May, ash and steam plumes drifted SE, SW, and NW. An ash plume at an altitude of 3.6 km (11,800 ft) a.s.l. was spotted on 14 May. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 20 May an eruption plume rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 May-13 May 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels on 5 May and at background levels the other days during 2-9 May. Based on seismic interpretation, hot avalanches possibly descended the growing lava dome. Video footage and visual observations showed fumarolic activity from the lava dome during 5-6 and 8 May. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during 5-8 May. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 April-6 May 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was at background levels during 25 April-2 May. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during 27, 28, and 30 April, and 1 May. On 28 April, ash deposits extending about 10 km NW were observed on satellite imagery and possible gas-and-ash explosions were detected by the seismic network. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 April-29 April 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 18-25 April. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during 18 and 20-23 April. According to video footage and visual observations, fumarolic activity from the lava dome occurred during 21-23 April. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 April-22 April 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 10-15 April and at background levels on 16 April. According to video footage and visual observations, fumarolic activity from the lava dome occurred during 12-15 April. Based on seismic interpretation, a possible ash plume rose to an altitude of 3 km (9,800 ft) a.s.l. on 14 April. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during 11-14 April. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 April-15 April 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels and hot avalanches possibly descended the growing lava dome daily during 4-11 April. According to video footage and visual observations, fumarolic activity from the lava dome also occurred every day. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 April-8 April 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 28 March-4 April and hot avalanches possibly descended the growing lava dome daily. According to video footage and visual observations, fumarolic activity from the lava dome was observed during 28-29 March and 1-3 April. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 March-1 April 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 21-28 March and hot avalanches possibly descended the dome during 19-22 March. According to video footage and visual observations, fumarolic activity from the lava dome was observed during 20-24 and 27 March. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 March-25 March 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 14-21 March. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,200 ft) a.s.l. on 13 and 17 March. According to video footage and visual observations, an ash plume rose to an altitude of 4 km (12,800 ft) a.s.l. on 17 March and fumarolic activity from the lava dome was observed during 17 and 19-20 March. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a gas plume drifted 17 km SW on 17 March and a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 March-18 March 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 7-14 March. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 4.1 km (13,500 ft) a.s.l. on 6 and 7 March. According to video footage and visual observations, fumarolic activity from the lava dome was observed during 6-8 March. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 March-11 March 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels and small hot avalanches descended the lava dome during 29 February-7 March. Ash plumes were possibly present. According to video footage and visual observations, fumarolic activity was observed during 29 February and 2-6 March. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 February-4 March 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels and small hot avalanches descended the lava dome during 22-29 February. According to video footage, fumarolic activity was observed during 21-22 and 24-25 February. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 5.6 km (18,400 ft) a.s.l. during 24-26 February. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 February-26 February 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 15-22 February. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. on 17 and 20 February. During the reporting period strong fumarolic activity was seen daily on video footage and a thermal anomaly was present in the crater on satellite imagery. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 February-19 February 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 8-11 February and at background levels on 12 and 13 February. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 3.3 km (10,800 ft) a.s.l. on 9 February. Strong fumarolic activity was noted during 8-9 and 11-12 February. According to observations of satellite imagery, a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 February-12 February 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 1-8 February. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.8 km (12,200 ft) a.s.l. daily. Strong fumarolic activity was noted on 5 and 6 February. According to observations of satellite imagery, a thermal anomaly was present in the crater on 1, 3, and 6 February. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 January-5 February 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 25 January-1 February. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.9 km (12,800 ft) a.s.l. daily. Fumarolic activity was noted on 24, 29, and 30 January. According to observations of satellite imagery, a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 January-29 January 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 18-25 January. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,100 ft) a.s.l. during 17-18, 20, and 23 January. Fumarolic activity was noted on 19, 20, and 22 January. Based on observations of satellite imagery, a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 January-22 January 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 11-18 January. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.1 km (13,500 ft) a.s.l. on 12 and 16 January. Ash plumes at an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. were visible on the Shiveluch web camera on 16 January. Strong fumarolic activity was noted during 15-17 January. Based on observations of satellite imagery, a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 January-15 January 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 4-11 January. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.3 km (20,700 ft) a.s.l. during 3-4, 6, and 9 January. Strong fumarolic activity was noted during 7-9 January. Based on observations of satellite imagery, a gas-and-steam plume drifted NW on 3 January and a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 4.9 and 4.6 km (16,000 and 15,000 ft) a.s.l. on 10 and 16 January, respectively.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


2 January-8 January 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 28 December-4 January. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l. during 28-31 December and on 1 and 3 January. Moderate fumarolic activity was noted on 30 December and 2 January. Based on observations of satellite imagery, a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 6.4 and 4.9 km (21,000 and 16,000 ft) a.s.l. on 4 and 6 January, respectively.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


26 December-1 January 2008

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 21-28 December. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. during 23-24 December. Based on observations of satellite imagery, a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on observations of satellite imagery and information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 4.9-5.8 km (16,000-19,000 ft) a.s.l. during 28-29 December.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


19 December-25 December 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 14-21 December. Based on seismic interpretation, a series of explosions during 18-19 December produced ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 6.5-8.7 km (21,300-29,000 ft) a.s.l. Ash plumes were observed on satellite imagery and drifted more than 130 km W on 18 December and 300 km to the NW and SW on 19 December. Ashfall was reported in the town of Klyuchi, about 30 km SW on 19 December. Based on visual observations, large pyroclastic flow deposits 8-9 km from the lava dome were noted on the S flank. On 20 December, KVERT reported that the Level of Concern Color Code was raised to Red. On 21 December, the Level of Concern Color Code was lowered back to Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 December-18 December 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 7-14 December. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. during 7-9 December. Visual observations and video footage analysis indicated that an ash plume rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. on 12 December and gas-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400 ft) a.s.l. during the reporting period. Based on observations of satellite imagery, a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day. On 18 December, KVERT reported that the number of shallow earthquakes increased from 70 on 10 December to 390 on 17 December. KVERT warned that the aviation hazard increased. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 December-11 December 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 30 November-7 December. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.3 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. and hot avalanches occurred. Visual observations and video footage analysis indicated that gas-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400 ft) a.s.l. during the reporting period. One ash plume rose to an altitude of 5.7 km (18,700 ft) a.s.l. on 2 December. Based on observations of satellite imagery, a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day during 30 November-7 December. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption plume rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. on 10 December.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


28 November-4 December 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 23-30 November. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. and hot avalanches occurred. Visual observations and video footage analysis indicated that gas-and-steam plumes rose to an altitude of 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. on 22 and 26-29 November. Based on observations of satellite imagery, ash plumes drifted SW, NW, N, and SE on 26, 27, and 28 November and a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 5.5 km and 5.8 km (18,000 ft and 19,000 ft) a.s.l. on 30 November and 2 December, respectively.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 November-13 November 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 2-9 November. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8.5 km (28,000 ft) a.s.l. and small hot avalanches occurred. Visual observations and video footage analysis indicated that ash and gas-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 6-8 km (19,700-26,200 ft) a.s.l. during 4-8 November. Clouds obscured views of the volcano on other days. Based on observations of satellite imagery, ash plumes drifted SW on 7 November and a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 4.9-5.5 km (16,000-18,000 ft) a.s.l. on 11 and 13 November.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


31 October-6 November 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 26 October-2 November. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.8 km (22,300 ft) a.s.l. and small hot avalanches occurred. Observations of video footage indicated that ash and gas-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 5-5.3 km (16,400-17,400 ft) a.s.l. on 25, 26, and 31 October, and 1 November. Based on observations of satellite imagery, ash plumes drifted SE during 27-31 October and a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KVERT and KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 5.2-8.5 km (17,000-28,000 ft) a.s.l. during 4-6 November.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 October-30 October 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 19-26 October. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.9 km (22,600 ft) a.s.l. and small hot avalanches occurred. Observations of video footage indicated that gas-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 3.3 km (10,800 ft) a.s.l. on 21 and 25 October. Based on observations of satellite imagery, ash plumes drifted SE on 19 October and a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 4.6-6.7 km (15,000-22,000 ft) a.s.l. during 27-28 and 30 October.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 October-23 October 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 12-19 October. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. and small hot avalanches occurred. Observations of video footage indicated that gas and occasionally ash plumes rose to altitudes of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. during 11-12 and 14-15 October. Based on observations of satellite imagery, ash plumes drifted E on 12, 14, and 16 October and a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 4.6-6.7 km (15,000-22,000 ft) a.s.l. on 18, 20, 22, and 23 October.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 October-16 October 2007

During 5-12 October, KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels and small hot avalanches occurred. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. during 4-6 and 9-11 October. Observations of video footage indicated that gas and occasionally ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. on 4, 6, 7, and 11 October. Fumarolic activity was noted on 8 October. Based on observations of satellite imagery, ash plumes drifted E during 4-8 October and a thermal anomaly was present in the crater every day during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption plume rose to an altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. on 16 October.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


3 October-9 October 2007

During 28 September-5 October, KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.3 km (17,400 ft) a.s.l. and hot avalanches occurred on 27 and 29 September. Ash plumes were visible on satellite imagery drifting WSW and SE. Observations of video footage indicated that gas-and-steam plumes rose up to altitudes of 4.5 km and 3.5 km (14,800 and 11,500 ft) a.s.l. on 27 September and 2 October, respectively. Fumarolic activity was noted on 1 October. A thermal anomaly was present in the crater on satellite imagery during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption plume rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


26 September-2 October 2007

During 21-28 September, KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels and hot avalanches occurred. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,100 ft) a.s.l. on 20 and 25 September. Observations of video footage indicated that gas-and-ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 21, 24, 25, and 26 September. Plumes drifted E during 24-25 September. A thermal anomaly was present in the crater on satellite imagery during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 September-25 September 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 14-21 September. During 14-15 and 17-20 September, avalanches occurred and ash plumes rose to altitudes of 3.5-5.5 km (11,500-18,000 ft) a.s.l. Observations of video data indicated that gas-and-ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.3 km (10,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE and E on 14 and 15 September. Gas-and-steam plumes were noted on 13, 18, and 19 September. A thermal anomaly was present in the crater on satellite imagery during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 September-18 September 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 7-14 September. During 6-9 September, avalanches occurred and ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4-6.5 km (13,100-21,300 ft) a.s.l. Observations of video data indicated that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. on 7 September. Gas-and-steam plumes were noted on 7, 10, and 11 September. A thermal anomaly was present in the crater on satellite imagery during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 September-11 September 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 31 August-7 September. Based on seismic interpretation during this interval, avalanches and ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 5.7 km (18,700 ft) a.s.l. Visual observation and video data indicated that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. on 1 September and drifted SE. Gas-and-steam plumes were noted on the other days. Observations of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly present in the crater during the reporting period. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information reported from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption plume rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l. on 9 September. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 August-4 September 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 24-31 August. Based on seismic interpretation, avalanches and ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 9 km (29,500 ft) a.s.l. occurred during the reporting period. Based on visual observation and video data, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. on 25 August. Clouds inhibited observations the other days. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during 24-31 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information reported from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption plume rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. on 2 September. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 August-28 August 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 17-24 August. Based on seismic interpretation, avalanches and ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 8.5 km (27,900 ft) a.s.l. occurred during the reporting period. Based on visual observation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N and NE during 17-21 August. Incandescence at the lava dome and incandescent avalanches were seen at night on 21 August. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during 17-24 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information reported from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 4.9-7.6 km (16,000-25,000 ft) a.s.l. during 24-27 August. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


15 August-21 August 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 10-17 August. Based on seismic interpretation, avalanches and ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. occurred during the reporting period. Growth of the E part of the lava dome, summit incandescence, and incandescent avalanches were visible from the town of Klyuchi, about 50 km SW, during 11-12 August. A diffuse ash plume was visible on satellite imagery drifting SE on 11 August. On 14 August, two avalanches were accompanied by ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during 10-17 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information reported from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption plume rose to 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. on 21 August. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


8 August-14 August 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 3-10 August. Based on seismic interpretation, avalanches and ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. occurred during the reporting period. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater during 2-5 and 8-9 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4.6-10.1 km (15,000-33,000 ft) a.s.l. during 12-13 August. Based on seismic interpretation, a high plume occurred again on 13 August. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


1 August-7 August 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 27 July-3 August. Observations of satellite imagery revealed that a thermal anomaly was present in the crater. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes and avalanches occurred during the reporting period. Gas-and-steam plumes were visible drifting S on 31 July; clouds inhibited visual observations on other days. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 July-31 July 2007

KVERT reports noted that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 20-27 July. Based on seismic interpretation, during this interval ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. Gas-and-steam plumes with some ash rose to altitudes of 3.0-4.5 km (9,800-14,800 ft) a.s.l. during 20-24 July. Based on satellite imagery, gas-and-steam plumes drifted S on 22 July and a large thermal anomaly was detected in the crater during 20-27 July. Through at least 27 July, the Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 July-24 July 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 13-20 July. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. during the reporting period. Gas-and-steam plumes with some ash rose to altitudes of 3-4.5 km (9,800-14,800 ft) a.s.l. during 11-15 and 18-19 July. Based on satellite imagery, plumes drifted S and SW during 15-16 July and a large thermal anomaly was detected in the crater during 13-20 July. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information reported from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption plume rose to 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l. on 24 July. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 July-17 July 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 6-13 July. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. during the reporting period. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 4-5 km (13,100-16,400 ft) a.s.l. during 9-11 July. A large thermal anomaly was detected in the crater on satellite imagery all days. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


4 July-10 July 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 29 June-6 July. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. during the reporting period. A large thermal anomaly was detected in the crater on satellite imagery all days. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption plume rose to 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. during 27-28 June. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


27 June-3 July 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 22-29 June. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. during the reporting period. A large thermal anomaly was detected in the crater on satellite imagery all days. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption plume rose to 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. during 27-28 June. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 June-26 June 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 15-22 June. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 5.3 km (17,400 ft) a.s.l. during the reporting period. On 15 June, gas-and-steam plumes drifted S. A large thermal anomaly was detected in the crater on satellite imagery during 14-17 and 20 June. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Based on information from KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an eruption plume rose to 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l. during 25-26 June. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 June-19 June 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 8-15 June and a thermal anomaly in the crater was detected on satellite imagery. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. during 8-10 and 13 June. Ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. on 8 and 10 June and were seen on satellite imagery drifting NW on 12 June. Based on seismic interpretation, multiple ash plumes rose to 6.3 km (20,700 ft) a.s.l. during 8-15. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 June-12 June 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 1-8 June and a thermal anomaly in the crater was detected on satellite imagery. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. during 1-3 and 5 June. Ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4.5-6 km (14,800-19,700 ft) a.s.l. on 1 and 6 June and were seen on satellite imagery drifting S and SE on 3 and 6 June. Based on seismic interpretation, multiple ash plumes rose to 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. during 1-8. The Tokyo VAAC reported that eruption plumes rose to altitudes of 4.3-9.1 km (14,000-30,000 ft) a.s.l. on 9, 11, and 12 June, based on information from KVERT and KEMSD. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


30 May-5 June 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 25 May-1 June. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 9.5 km (31,200 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. According to visual observation and video data, gas-and-steam and ash plumes rose to altitudes of 5-6 km (16,400-19,700 ft) a.s.l. during 27-28 and 30-31 May. Plumes were seen on satellite imagery drifting SW during 27-28 May. A large thermal anomaly was also visible on satellite imagery. The Tokyo VAAC reported that based on reports from KEMSD, an eruption plume rose to an altitude of 6.4 km (21,000 ft) a.s.l. on 2 June. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 May-29 May 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 18-25 May. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes possibly rose to altitudes of 4-8 km (13,100-26,200 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. Plumes were visible on satellite imagery drifting N, NE, and NW during 17-19 May. A large thermal anomaly was also visible on satellite imagery. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 May-22 May 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 11-18 May. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes possibly rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. A large thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 May-15 May 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 4-11 May. Based on seismic interpretation, observation, and video data, ash plumes possibly rose to altitudes of 6-7 km (19,700-23,000 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. Plumes were seen on satellite imagery drifting E on 5 and 7 May and a thermal anomaly was present during 4-11 May. Gas-and-steam activity was noted during 4-7 May. Visual and video data revealed hot avalanches originating from the lava dome during 4 and 6-7 May. Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that ash plumes rose to altitude of 5.8-8.2 km (19,000-27,000 ft) a.s.l. during 9-11 May. An ash plume was possibly seen on satellite imagery to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l. drifting NW on 15 May. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


2 May-8 May 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 27 April-4 May. Based on seismic interpretation, observation, and video data, ash-and-steam plumes possibly rose to altitudes of 4-10 km (13,100-32,800 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. Plumes were seen on satellite imagery drifting S and SW during 28-29 April and a thermal anomaly was present during 27 April-4 May. Based on visual and video data, hot avalanches originating from the lava dome were observed on 30 April. Based on information from the KEMSD, the Tokyo VAAC reported that an ash plume rose to an altitude of 4.9 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l. on 7 May. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Itar-Tass News


25 April-1 May 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 20-27 April. Based on seismic interpretation, observation, and video data, ash-and-steam plumes possibly rose to altitudes of 6.5-9 km (21,300-30,000 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. Plumes were seen on satellite imagery drifting E and SE, and a thermal anomaly was present. Hot avalanches originated from the dome. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 April-24 April 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 13-20 April. Based on seismic interpretation, observation, and video data, ash-and-steam plumes possibly rose to altitudes of 5.5-6.5 km (18,000-21,300 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. Plumes were seen on satellite imagery drifting E, SE, and S and a thermal anomaly was present. Base on pilot reports, satellite imagery, KEMSD, and observations from the Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky Flight Information Region (FIR), the Tokyo VAAC reported that ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4.6-6.1 km (15,000-20,000 ft) a.s.l. during 18-22 April. They drifted E. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 April-17 April 2007

Seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 4-10 April. Based on seismic interpretation, observation, and video data, possible ash-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 4.5-7 km (14,800-23,000 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. Based on satellite imagery during 10-12 April, plumes drifted N, NW, SE, and SW and a thermal anomaly was present. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 April-10 April 2007

Seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 4-10 April. Based on seismic interpretation, observation, and video data, ash-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 4.5-5 km (14,800-16,400 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. Plumes drifted N on 6 April. A large thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery during 1-10 April. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 March-3 April 2007

An explosive event at Shiveluch on 29 March produced an ash plume that rose to an estimated altitude of 9.8 km (32,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE. Based on reports from the Yelizovo Meteorological Watch Office and satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that the plume reached an altitude of 11.9 km (39,000 ft) a.s.l. The next day, an explosive event that lasted about 6 minutes produced a plume to altitudes of 10.1-12.2 km (33,000-40,000 ft) a.s.l., based on estimates from AVO, Tokyo VAAC, and the Kamchatkan Branch of Geophysical Services. The plume drifted NE.

According to a news article, a mudflow covered an approximately 900-m-long section of road, about 20 km from Shiveluch on 31 March.

Sources: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Itar-Tass News


21 March-27 March 2007

Based on satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that emissions of gas and steam from Shiveluch continued on 22 March. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Source: Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 February-27 February 2007

Seismic activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 16-22 February. Based on seismic interpretation, observation, and video data, gas-and-ash plumes rose to altitudes of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. Plumes drifted S, NW, and N. A large thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery. The Tokyo VAAC reported eruption plumes to altitudes of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. on 22 February based on information from KEMSD, KVERT, and satellite imagery. Plumes drifted N. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


14 February-20 February 2007

Activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 9-16 February, with over 180 volcanic earthquakes and tremor occurring daily. Based on seismic interpretation, observation, and video data, gas-and-ash plumes rose to altitudes of 5.5-6 km (18,000-19,700 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. Plumes drifted W and SW. A large thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery. The Tokyo VAAC reported eruption plumes to altitudes of 5.2-6.1 km (17,000-20,000 ft) a.s.l. on 15 and 19 February based on information from KEMSD, KVERT, and satellite imagery. Plumes drifted NW on 19 February. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 February-13 February 2007

Activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 2-9 February, with over 200 shallow earthquakes occurring daily. Based on seismic interpretation, observation, and video data, gas-and-ash plumes rose 4.0-5.5 km (13,100-18,000 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. Plumes drifted NE and NW. A large thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery. The Tokyo VAAC reported ash plumes to an altitude of 5.2-5.5 km (17,000-18,000 ft) a.s.l. on 10 and 13 February that were visible on satellite imagery. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


31 January-6 February 2007

Activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 26 January-2 February, with over 140 shallow earthquakes occurring daily. Based on seismic interpretation, observation, and video data, gas-and-ash plumes rose 3.5-4.5 km (11,500-14,800 ft) a.s.l. throughout the reporting period. Plumes drifted ESE. A large thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery. The Tokyo VAAC reported ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. on 1 February were visible on satellite imagery drifting E. An eruption occurred on 6 February that was not visible on satellite imagery. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


24 January-30 January 2007

Activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 19-26 January, with over 120 shallow earthquakes occurring daily. Based on seismic interpretation and observation and video data, gas-and-ash plumes rose to 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. and avalanches occurred throughout the reporting period. Plumes drifted W and NW. Fumarolic activity from the SW flank was noted on 25 January. A large thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery. Based on satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. on 28 and 29 January and drifted SE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 January-23 January 2007

Activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 12-19 January, with over 160 shallow earthquakes occurring daily. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l. and avalanches occurred throughout the reporting period. According to observation and video data, gas-and-ash plumes rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. on 16 January. Plumes drifted SW, NW, and NE on 12 and 14-18 January. A large thermal anomaly over the dome was noted. Based on satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. on 22 and 23 January and drifted NW.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


10 January-16 January 2007

Activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 5-12 January, with over 200 shallow earthquakes occurring daily. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to 7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. and avalanches occurred throughout the reporting period. According to observation and video data, gas-and-ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,700 ft) a.s.l. during 5-7 and 10-11 January. Plumes drifted E and SSW. A large thermal anomaly over the dome was noted.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 January-9 January 2007

Activity at Shiveluch continued above background levels during 29 December-5 January, with 200 shallow earthquakes occurring daily. Based on seismic interpretation, ash plumes rose to 13.7 km (45,000 ft) a.s.l. According to visual and video data, a large hot avalanche occurred on the SE flank on 4 January. Fumarolic activity was noted during 29-31 December and 2-4 January. The Tokyo VAAC reported eruption plumes to altitudes of 4.3-7.6 km (14,000-25,000 ft) a.s.l. during 5-7 January based on information from the Kamchatkan Experimental and Methodical Seismological Department (KEMSD) and satellite imagery.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


27 December-2 January 2007

KVERT reported that seismic activity from Shiveluch decreased on 27 December, but still remained above background levels. Based on video data, a steam-and-gas plume rose to 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. on 27 December. On 28 December, ash plumes rose to 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. and were seen on satellite imagery drifting E. The level of Concern Color Code was lowered to Orange.

Based on information from the Kamchatkan Experimental & Methodical Seismological Department (KEMSD) and satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that eruptions produced plumes rising to 4.9-8.2 km (16,000-27,000 ft) a.s.l. on 1 and 2 January.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 December-26 December 2006

According to observations, video data, and satellite imagery KVERT reported that ash plumes from Shiveluch rose to 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E on 16-17 and 20 December. Seismic activity was generally at background levels. Based on satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that a possible eruption plume rose to an altitude of 9.1 km (30,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E on 24 December. Seismic and video data on 26 December indicated an ash plume above 10 km (32,800 ft.) a.s.l., extending 150 km NE in satellite imagery. The level of Concern Color Code was raised from Orange to Red.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 December-19 December 2006

According to observations and video data, KVERT reported that ash plumes from Shiveluch rose to 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW and ESE on 8 and 12 December, respectively. Based on satellite imagery, ash plumes rose to altitudes of 6-7.5 km (19,700-24,600 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and NE during 8-15 December. Seismic activity was generally at background levels. The Tokyo VAAC and KVERT reported that ash plumes rose to altitudes of 7.6-10 km (25,000-32,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and NW on 16 and 17 December.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 December-12 December 2006

According to observations and video data, KVERT reported fumarolic activity from Shiveluch during 2-4 and 6-7 December. Based on satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported possible eruption plumes on 8 and 11 December that reached altitudes of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW and NE, respectively. Satellite imagery and a pilot observation reported by the VAAC indicated ash plumes on 12 December to altitudes of 3-5.8 km (10,000-19,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 November-5 December 2006

KVERT reported that a strong seismic event from Shiveluch was recorded on 4 December at 2100. Prior to the event, seismicity was at background levels and weak fumarolic activity was observed. According to video data from 5 December, explosions produced plumes that rose to an altitude of 4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW. Strong explosions from the lava dome were possible and avalanches to a distance of 3-5 km down the SW flank were noted. The Level of Concern Color Code was raised from Yellow to Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 July-25 July 2006

Eruption plumes from Shiveluch that were visible on satellite imagery on 19 July reached a maximum altitude of 5.2 km (17,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE. Ash was not visible on satellite imagery. A thermal anomaly over the dome was visible on 17 and 18 July.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


2 November-8 November 2005

Seismic activity and lava-dome growth continued at Shiveluch during 28 October to 4 November. Seismicity decreased gradually during the previous 2 weeks and only weak avalanches were recorded, so KVERT reduced the Concern Color Code at Shiveluch from Orange to Yellow on 4 November.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 October-1 November 2005

The growth of Shiveluch's lava dome continued during 21-28 October. Weak shallow earthquakes, hot avalanches, and low-intensity fumarolic activity occurred at the volcano during the week. On 22 and 24 October, incandescence was visible at the lava dome. A weak ash-and-gas plume extending E was observed on 22 October. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 October-25 October 2005

The growth of Shiveluch's lava dome continued during 14-21 October. Weak shallow earthquakes, hot avalanches, and low-intensity fumarolic activity occurred at the volcano during the week. On 15 and 17 October, incandescence was visible at the lava dome. A thermal anomaly from the lava dome was seen in satellite imagery during the report week. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 September-4 October 2005

Growth of Shiveluch's lava dome and heightened seismicity continued at the volcano during 23-30 September. Weak gas-and-steam plumes, thermal anomalies at the lava dome, and new pyroclastic-flow deposits, were noted during the report week. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 September-27 September 2005

KVERT raised the Concern Color Code at Shiveluch from Orange to Red (the highest level) on 22 September. According to interpretations of seismic data, on the 22nd at 1715 a strong eruption began, with ash plumes reaching ~7.5 km (24,600 ft) a.s.l. [corrected by KVERT to 6.5 km (21,300 ft) a.s.l.] and hot avalanches and pyroclastic flows descending the volcano's flanks. The pyroclastic flows extended 10-15 km. The strongest seismic signal of the eruption occurred on 22 September at 2259. Shallower signals recorded between 22 September at 2330 and 23 September at 1200 were possibly associated with ash emissions that rose to 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. An ash plume was visible on satellite imagery at a height of ~3 km (9,850 ft) a.s.l. extending ~20 km SSW. The Concern Color Code was reduced to Orange on 23 September.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 September-20 September 2005

Growth of Shiveluch's lava dome continued during 9-16 September. Incandescence was visible at the dome on 13 September. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. and a large thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 September-13 September 2005

During 2-9 September, Shiveluch's lava dome continued to grow and viscous lava flowed from it. On 5 September, an ash plume rose to ~4 km (13,100 ft) a.s.l. On 8 September, a hot avalanche was accompanied by an ash plume that rose to a height of ~3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. A large thermal anomaly was visible at the volcano during the report period. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


31 August-6 September 2005

Growth of Shiveluch's lava dome continued during 26 August to 2 September, and viscous lava continued to flow at the lava dome. Several ash plumes reached ~5.5 km (18,050 ft) a.s.l. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 August-30 August 2005

Growth of Shiveluch's lava dome continued during 19-26 August. During the report period, about ten shallow earthquakes were recorded, a large thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery, and fumarolic activity occurred. A photo taken by Yu Demyanchuk on 19 August showed a new viscous lava flow emitted from the lava dome. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 August-16 August 2005

During 5-12 August, Shiveluch's lava dome continued to grow, and a persistent thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery. Fumarolic activity and incandescence at the lava dome were visible on 6 August. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 August-9 August 2005

Shiveluch's lava dome continued to grow during 3-9 August. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 July-2 August 2005

Shiveluch's lava dome continued to grow during 22-29 July. On 23 July, a persistent thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery, and incandescence was observed at the lava dome. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 July-26 July 2005

Growth of Shiveluch's lava dome continued during 15-22 July. A gas-and-steam plume rose to ~3.5 km (~11,500 ft) a.s.l. on 19 July. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 July-19 July 2005

Growth of Shiveluch's lava dome continued during 7-15 July. Video footage on 7 July showed ash-and-gas plumes rising to ~5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. accompanied by hot avalanches. On 9 July, ash-and-gas plumes rose to 3 km (9,800 ft) a.s.l. Ash plumes extended 27 km SW of the volcano during July 11-12. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 July-12 July 2005

On 6 July ash-and-gas plumes from Shiveluch rose to ~7 km (~23,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW. On 7 July an 11-minute-long seismic event occurred and ash-and-gas plumes may have reached a height of 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. Around 8 July, KVERT raised the Concern Color Code at Shiveluch from Orange to Red, the highest level. On 8 July, video footage showed weak gas-and-steam plumes rising to ~5 km (16,400 ft ) a.s.l. On 9 July, the Concern Color Code was reduced to Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 June-5 July 2005

During 24 June to 1 July, satellite imagery of Shiveluch showed a persistent thermal anomaly and fumarolic activity producing steam to 4-5 km (13,100-16,400 ft) a.s.l. On 30 June, ash-and-gas plumes rose 3-5 km (9,800-16,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW. Hot avalanches of volcanic material were also recorded during the report week. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 June-28 June 2005

Shiveluch's lava dome continued to grow as of 24 June. A persistent thermal anomaly and fumarolic activity was also reported during the week of 18-24 June. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 June-21 June 2005

Shiveluch's lava dome continued to grow during 10-17 June. A gas-and-steam plume rose ~400 m above the 2.5-km-high lava dome (9,500 ft a.s.l.) on 10 June. A thermal anomaly was visible at the lava dome on satellite imagery on several days. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


8 June-14 June 2005

During 3-10 June, two shallow M 1.6-1.7 earthquakes occurred 0-5 km beneath Shiveluch's active lava dome. On 7 June, gas-and-steam plumes rose as high as 100 m above the 2.5-km-high lava dome (8,500 ft a.s.l.). A persistent thermal anomaly was visible at the lava dome all week. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


1 June-7 June 2005

During 27 May to 3 June, Shiveluch's lava dome continued to grow and satellite data showed a persistent thermal anomaly at the dome. On 31 May an ash plume rose ~1.5 km above the 2.5-km-high lava dome (13,100 ft. a.s.l.). Gas-and-steam plumes rose to ~400 m above the lava dome (9,500 ft. a.s.l.) during the rest of the report period. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 May-31 May 2005

During 20-27 May, Shiveluch's lava dome continued to grow. No explosive events were recorded during the week, although gas-and-steam plumes were seen rising as high as 800 m above the 2.5-km-high lava dome (10,800 ft a.s.l.). Satellite data showed a thermal anomaly at the lava dome. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 May-24 May 2005

No explosive events were recorded at Shiveluch during 13-20 May, however, gas-and-steam plumes rose as high as 1.2 km above the lava dome (12,100 ft. a.s.l.). Satellite imagery showed a persistent thermal anomaly at the lava dome. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 May-17 May 2005

Growth of the lava dome continued during 6-13 May. A gas-and-steam plume was seen rising up to 400 m above the dome on 6 May. Clouds obscured the volcano at other times. A large thermal anomaly at the dome was detected in satellite imagery all week. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 May-10 May 2005

Growth of the lava dome continued during 30 April-6 May with a new extrusion in the W part of the dome. Ash-and-gas plumes, some rising 2 km above the dome, were frequent during this period. A large thermal anomaly was seen in satellite data the entire week. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 April-3 May 2005

On 25 April, a hot avalanche on Shiveluch lava dome's W side produced an ash plume that rose ~2 km above the 2.5-km-high lava dome (14,800 ft a.s.l.). During 22-29 April, gas-and-steam plumes rose to a maximum height of 1 km above the lava dome (11,500 ft a.s.l.). Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 April-26 April 2005

During 15-22 April, gas-and-steam plumes rose to ~1.2 km above Shiveluch's 2.5-km-high lava dome (~12,100 ft a.s.l.). Satellite imagery showed a large thermal anomaly at the lava dome on 16, and 18-21 April, and a small anomaly associated with a pyroclastic flow on the 19th. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 April-19 April 2005

Gas-and-steam plumes rose to ~400 m above Shiveluch's 2.5-km-high lava dome (~9,500 ft a.s.l.) on 8 April and one extended ~50 km SW on the 14th. A thermal anomaly was visible at the lava dome on satellite imagery during the week, except on 10 April. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 April-12 April 2005

During 1-8 April, intensive growth of the new extrusion at the W part of Shiveluch's lava dome continued. The eastern and western parts of the lava dome had become nearly level. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to ~1 km above the 2.5-km-high lava dome (~11,500 ft a.s.l.).Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 March-5 April 2005

The lava dome at Shiveluch continued to grow during 25 March to 1 April. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to 1.5 km above the ~2.5-km-high lava dome (~13,100 ft a.s.l.) on several days. Between 5-28 March a new lava extrusion added ~50 m height to the SW part of the lava dome. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 March-29 March 2005

The lava dome at Shiveluch continued to grow during 18-25 March. A lava flow traveled from a portion of the lava dome that was destroyed during an eruption on 28 February. During the report period, gas-and-steam plumes rose to ~1 km above the 2.5-km-high lava dome (~11,500 ft a.s.l.). Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 March-22 March 2005

The lava dome at Shiveluch continued to grow during 11-18 March. On 11 March an ash-and-gas plume reached a height of ~2.8 km above the dome (~20,000 ft a.s.l.). During 11-12 March, gas-and-steam plumes rose to 1.2 km above the dome (~14,700 ft. a.s.l.). Satellite imagery showed a thermal anomaly at the lava dome during the report week, and a large thermal anomaly over the recent pyroclastic-flow deposit during 11-12 March. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 March-8 March 2005

Explosions at Shiveluch during 25 February to 4 March deposited ash in Ust'-Hairyuzovo village on 27 and 28 February, and 2 March. The seismic station at Shiveluch stopped working on 27 February. According to visual and video data, part of a large pyroclastic flow was observed on the SW flank of the volcano on 2 March. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 February-1 March 2005

Based on interpretations of seismic data, a large eruption occurred at Shiveluch from 1825 on 27 February to 0100 on 28 February, leading KVERT to raise the Concern Color Code from Orange to Red (the highest level). Meteorological clouds obscured the volcano during the eruption. A large thermal anomaly visible near the lava dome on satellite imagery at 0456 on 28 February was probably the signal from a large pyroclastic flow on the volcano's SW flank. At this time a 45-km-long ash cloud was visible on satellite imagery trending NW of the volcano. At 0900 on the 28th, ash deposits were noted in the town of Klyuchi, ~46 km from the volcano. Satellite imagery from 1205 on 28 February showed ash deposits W of Shiveluch covering an area of 24,800 square kilometers. Later that day, an ash cloud extending more than 360 km was centered over the western half of Kamchatka. On 1 March the Concern Color Code was reduced to Orange. Prior to the eruption, during 18-26 February, seismicity was above background levels and ash-and-gas plumes were seen on video rising to ~3 km above the lava dome.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 February-22 February 2005

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 11-18 February, with weak shallow earthquakes occurring beneath the active lava dome. Ash plumes may have risen to a maximum height of 7.4 km a.s.l. on 17 February. Possible weak ash-and-gas explosions and hot avalanches occurred during the week. Ash deposits were seen on the volcano's snow-covered lava dome extending to the SE and S. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 February-15 February 2005

Seismicity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 4-11 February, with weak shallow earthquakes occurring beneath the active dome. On 6 February a pyroclastic flow traveled ~2 km down the volcano's flank. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash-and-gas explosions may have risen to 5.1 km a.s.l. on 6, 7, and 9 February. Weak ash-and-gas explosions and hot avalanches possibly occurred during the week. Ash-and-gas plumes were seen rising to 2.4 km above the lava dome. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 January-18 January 2005

During 8-14 January, seismicity decreased slightly at Shiveluch but remained above background levels. Seismicity indicated that from 1815 to 1945 on 13 January, several ash explosions up to 5 km a.s.l. and a pyroclastic flow probably occurred. Possible weak ash-and-gas explosions and hot avalanches occurred during 8-14 January. According to visual observations and video data, gas-and-steam plumes rose up to ~2.5-3.4 km a.s.l. during 6-8 January and on 12 January. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

The Tokyo VAAC reported an eruption of Shiveluch on 17 January at 1625 with a plume that rose to a height of ~4.5 km a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 December-4 January 2005

During 23-28 December, seismicity decreased slightly at Shiveluch but remained above background levels. Seismicity indicated that possible ash-and-gas explosions occurred on 26 and 27 December and plumes may have risen as high as ~4 km a.s.l. Observed explosions also occurred on 26 and 27 December that produced gas-and-ash explosions to ~2 km above the lava dome. Possible weak gas-and-ash explosions accompanied by hot avalanches occurred throughout the report period. On 28 December a gas-and-steam plume extended as far as 50 km E. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 December-28 December 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 19-22 December, with weak shallow earthquakes occurring at a depth of ~0.5 km beneath the active lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash-and-gas explosions may have risen to 3.5 km a.s.l. on 20 December. Hot avalanches may have occurred during 16-19 December. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 November-23 November 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 12-19 November, with weak shallow earthquakes occurring at a depth of 0.5 km beneath the active lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, possible ash-and-gas explosions up to 6 km a.s.l were registered on 15 November. Ash-and-gas explosions up to 4-5 km a.s.l were noted all week and possible weak ash-and-gas explosions and hot avalanches also occurred. According to visual and video data, ash-and-gas explosions rose up to 4-5 km a.s.l on 11 and 18 November. Gas-and-steam plumes were observed on 11 and 15 November. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 November-16 November 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 5-12 November, with weak shallow earthquakes occurring beneath the active lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, possible ash-and-gas explosions up to 6.5-7 km a.s.l. were registered on 5, 7, 9, and 11 November. During the week gas-dominated plumes rose to ~4 km a.s.l. and those bearing ash rose to 3.5-6 km. Possible minor ash-and-gas explosions and hot avalanches also occurred. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 November-9 November 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 29 October-5 November, with weak shallow earthquakes occurring beneath the active lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, possible ash-and-gas explosions up to 6.5 km a.s.l. occurred on 30 October and 2-4 November. Ash-and-gas explosions up to 3.5-5.5 km a.s.l. were noted all week and possible hot avalanches also occurred. According to video data, ash-and-gas explosions rose to 3.5-6 km a.s.l. during 28-30 October, and 1 and 3-4 November. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 October-26 October 2004

During 15-22 October, seismicity at Shiveluch was above background levels, with shallow earthquakes occurring beneath the active lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash-and-gas explosions possibly produced plumes to 6.5 km a.s.l. In addition, avalanches of hot material may have occurred during the week. KVERT reported seeing a new lava flow at Shiveluch's lava dome around 26 October. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 October-19 October 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 8-15 October, with weak shallow earthquakes occurring beneath the active lava dome. Two relatively strong shallow earthquakes, M 1.75 and 2.1, were recorded on 8 and 11 October, respectively. Spasmodic tremor was recorded during 7-12 October. Based on interpretations of seismic data, weak ash-and-gas explosions and hot avalanches may have occurred all week. Visual observations from the town of Klyuchi revealed that ash plumes rose to 3.5 km a.s.l. on 7 and 12 October and extended more than 10 km E. Weak gas-and-steam activity occurred on 11 and 12 October. Clouds obscured the volcano at other times. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 September-21 September 2004

Unrest at the volcano continues, with a lava dome growing in the active crater and above-background levels of seismicity. On 12 September a gas-and-steam plume extended > 70 km to the ESE. According to seismic data, during 14-16 September there were four possible ash plumes up to 5-6 km a.s.l.. Video data confirmed an ash plume on the 15th. According to satellite data, 1-12-pixel thermal anomalies were registered over the lava dome on 15-16 September.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


8 September-14 September 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 3-10 September, with several weak earthquakes occurring 0-5 km beneath the active lava dome. On 6 September at 2054 an explosion produced small pyroclastic flows and an ash plume that rose to ~5.5 km a.s.l. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


1 September-7 September 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 27 August to 3 September, with weak earthquakes occurring 0-5 km beneath the lava dome. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to ~2.6 km a.s.l. on 1 September. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 August-24 August 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 13-20 August, with weak earthquakes 0-5 km beneath the active lava dome. Gas-and-steam plumes rose ~3 km a.s.l. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 August-17 August 2004

During 6-13 August, seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch, with weak earthquakes occurring 0-5 km beneath the active dome. On several days gas-and-steam plumes rose to a maximum height of ~2.9 km a.s.l. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 August-10 August 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 30 July to 6 August, with weak earthquakes occurring 0-5 km beneath the active lava dome. On 4 August at 1705 an ash plume rose ~5 km a.s.l. and drifted E. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 July-3 August 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 22-30 July, with weak earthquakes occurring 0-5 km below the active lava dome. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to ~2.8 km a.s.l. on 28 and 29 July. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 July-20 July 2004

Seismicity at Shiveluch remained above background levels during 9-16 July, with earthquakes up to M 1.75. Spasmodic tremor was recorded during the week. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 July-13 July 2004

The lava dome continued to grow in Shiveluch's active crater. Gas-and-steam plumes were reported by KVERT on 2-3 July rising as high as 3.3 km a.s.l.; clouds obscured the volcano during 3-8 July. Seismicity was above background levels for 3-9 July. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 June-6 July 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 25 June to 2 July, with several shallow earthquakes occurring beneath the active lava dome. Gas-and-steam plumes were seen rising to ~3.5 km a.s.l. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 June-29 June 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 18-25 June. Shallow earthquakes up to M 1.75 were recorded, along with nearly continuous spasmodic tremor. Gas plumes rose to ~4 km a.s.l. On 19 June, a likely ash cloud was seen 10-20 km S of the volcano. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 June-15 June 2004

Seismic activity remained above background levels at Shiveluch during 4-11 June, with several shallow earthquakes occurring beneath the active lava dome. According to visual and video observations from the town of Klyuchi, during 3-5 and 10 June, gas-and-steam plumes rose to 3.3-3.9 km a.s.l. and extended more than 10 km SE, E, W, and NW. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 June-8 June 2004

Between 28 May and 4 June, seismic activity at Shiveluch was above background levels with many shallow earthquakes recorded. Continuous spasmodic tremor was recorded during 27-29 May with an increase in volcanic seismicity beginning on 29 May and continuing through 2 June. On 31 May a possible gas-and-ash plume rose to 5.5 km a.s.l. and on 27-28 May gas-and-steam plumes were observed rising up to ~2.5 km a.s.l. and drifting E. A small lava flow on top of the active dome, first observed on 21 May, continued to flow until 28 May. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 May-1 June 2004

On 21 May, observations of Shiveluch from a helicopter revealed pyroclastic flows and partial destruction of the lava dome. Ash deposits were concentrated in the central sector of the southern volcanic slope. During 21-28 May seismicity was above background levels, with a large number of shallow earthquakes occurring. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to ~4 km a.s.l. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


12 May-18 May 2004

During 7-14 May seismic activity was above background levels at Shiveluch, with a large number of shallow earthquakes occurring. Based on interpretations of seismic data, during 6-7 May there may have been three ash-and-gas explosions that produced plumes to ~ 7 km a.s.l. On 9 May a strong explosion deposited ash in Ust-Kamchatsk, closing the airport. The road and the dam in the area of the Bekesh river were destroyed by mud flows.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


5 May-11 May 2004

On 10 May around 0200 a strong eruption began at Shiveluch, leading KVERT to raise the Concern Color Code from Orange to Red (the highest level). Video and visual observations revealed ash explosions that rose to ~11 km a.s.l. and drifted ESE. At 1114 pyroclastic and mud flows traveled 7-8 km down the volcano's SE slope. Ash was deposited as far as 100 km from the volcano. On 11 May the Concern Color Code was reduced to Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 April-27 April 2004

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 16-23 April, with a large number of weak earthquakes occurring 0-5 km beneath the active lava dome and ten M 1.5-2.7 earthquakes. Based on interpretations of seismic data, during 15-18, and 21 April six ash-and-gas explosions may have produced plumes to 4-7 km a.s.l. The highest rising observed plume (8 km a.s.l.) was produced from an ash-and-gas explosion on 18 April. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 April-20 April 2004

Seismicity at Shiveluch remained above background levels during 9-16 April with many small shallow earthquakes located at depths of 0-5 km and a total of ten M 1.8-2.3 earthquakes recorded on 8, 10, and 14 April. On these days gas-and-ash plumes probably reached ~4.5-5.5 km a.s.l. four times and ~7.5 km a.s.l. at least once. On 18 April, a gas-and-ash plume reached ~9 km a.s.l. and on 19 April a plume rose to ~1 km above the vent. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Pravda News


7 April-13 April 2004

Seismicity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 2-9 April, with 16 earthquakes up to M 2 occurring during 1-3 and 6-7 April. Based on interpretations of seismic data, one ash-and-gas explosion may have produced a plume that reached a height of 9 km a.s.l., and 13 plumes may have reached 7.2 km a.s.l. during several days. During 6-8 April, ash plumes extended 20-50 km SE and E. On 7 April an ash-and-gas explosion produced a plume to a height of 6.2 km a.s.l. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


31 March-6 April 2004

According to KVERT, during 26 March to 2 April seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch. About 14 shallow earthquakes up to M 2 occurred during 25 and 28-31 March. Based on interpretations of seismic data, 15 ash-and-gas explosions may have produced plumes to 5 km a.s.l. during 25 and 28-31 March. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), RIA Novosti, Itar-Tass News


24 March-30 March 2004

During 19-26 March, seismic activity was above background levels at Shiveluch with many shallow earthquakes up to M 1.75 recorded. Based on interpretations of seismic data, a pyroclastic flow occurred on 19 March and explosions produced gas-and-ash plumes on 19-20 and 25 March that might have reached 6-7 km a.s.l. on two occasions and 3.5-4.5 km a.s.l. on nine other occasions. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 March-23 March 2004

During 12-19 March, seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch, with a large number of shallow earthquakes up to M 2 occurring beneath the volcano. Spasmodic volcanic tremor was also recorded. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash-and-gas explosions may have produced plumes to a maximum height of 5 km a.s.l. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 March-16 March 2004

Seismicity at Shiveluch was above background levels during 5-12 March, with a large number of shallow earthquakes up to M 2 occurring beneath the volcano. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash-and-gas explosions rose to a maximum height of ~6 km a.s.l. Video footage shot on 9 March showed an ash plume rising to ~4 km a.s.l. and drifting S. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 March-9 March 2004

During 27 February to 5 March, seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch. A large number of shallow earthquakes up to M 2 were recorded beneath the volcano, as well as spasmodic volcanic tremor. Based on interpretations of seismic data, ash-and-gas explosions rose to a maximum height of ~5.5 km a.s.l. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 February-6 March 2004

UTC + 12 hours) Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 23 September to 1 October, with 26 strong shallow earthquakes up to M 2.3 recorded during 23-29 September. Several explosions were seen that produced ash plumes to a maximum height of 4.5 km a.s.l., while interpretations of seismic data suggested that plumes rose to 6.5 km a.s.l. [Correction: According to interpretations of seismic data there were ~20 ash plumes at heights between 4 and 6.5 km a.s.l. Several explosions were confirmed by video observation at a maximum height of 4.5 km a.s.l. Clouds or night obscured the remainder.] An explosion on 25 September was accompanied by small pyroclastic flows. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 February-2 March 2004

During 20-27 February, seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch, with a large number of weak shallow earthquakes occurring at depths of 0-5 km beneath the active lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, on 23 February an ash-and-gas explosion produced a plume to ~5 km a.s.l. Gas-and-steam plumes were seen rising to ~4 km a.s.l. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), RIA Novosti


18 February-24 February 2004

During 13-20 February, seismicity was slightly above background levels at Shiveluch. A large number of weak, shallow earthquakes was recorded daily at depths of 0-5 km beneath the active lava dome. Spasmodic tremor was recorded the entire week. Based on interpretations of seismic data, two ash-and-gas explosions on 12 February, and one on 16 February, produced ash plumes to ~4 km a.s.l. Visual and video observations revealed that two ash plume rose to ~5 km a.s.l. and drifted E on 12 February. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 February-17 February 2004

During 6-13 February, seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch. A large number of weak shallow earthquakes and one to three M1.5-2.3 earthquakes were recorded daily at depths of 0-5 km beneath the active lava dome. Spasmodic tremor was recorded all week. Based on interpretations of seismic data, one to three ash-and-gas explosions occurred per day, sending ash to 4-6 km a.s.l. Visual and video observations revealed ash plumes rising to ~5 km a.s.l. on 10 February. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 February-10 February 2004

During 30 January to 6 February, seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch, with 1-4 shallow M 1.25-2.25 earthquakes occurring daily and a large number of weaker earthquakes at depths of 0-5 km beneath the active lava dome. Based on interpretations of seismic data, during 2-4 February three possible ash-and-gas explosion occurred per day, producing plumes to 3.5-5.5 km a.s.l. Video footage on 4 February showed an ash plume rising to ~5 km a.s.l. Gas-and-steam plumes were seen during much of the week. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 January-3 February 2004

During 23-30 January, seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch, with a large number of weak shallow earthquakes occurring at depths of 0-5 km beneath the lava dome. In addition, 5-7 shallow M 1.75-2.3 earthquakes occurred each day except for 22 January. Intermittent tremor was recorded all week. Based on seismic data, 8 and 9 ash-and-gas explosions occurred on 22 and 23 January, respectively, sending ash to 3.5-4.5 km above the volcano. Video footage on 22 January confirmed that four ash plumes rose to ~3.5 km. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 January-27 January 2004

Volcanic activity remained at relatively high levels at Shiveluch during 16-23 January. Several explosions occurred, producing ash plumes that rose to a maximum height of 6 km a.s.l. Ash explosions on 21 January were accompanied by pyroclastic flows with run-out distances of ~ 2 km. During the report period, seismicity was above background levels, with ~200 shallow M 1.75-2.6 earthquakes occurring as well as a large number of weaker events. Intermittent spasmodic volcanic tremor also occurred. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Itar-Tass News


14 January-20 January 2004

During 11-12 January, explosions at Shiveluch produced ash plumes to 4 km a.s.l. that drifted W. The explosions were accompanied by pyroclastic flows with run-out distances around 1 km. On 16 January at 1125 an eruption produced an ash plume that rose ~5.5 km a.s.l. and drifted W. The same day KVERT raised the Concern Color Code to Orange from Yellow. During 9-16 January, seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch, with the recording of ~70 shallow earthquakes greater than M 1.75 and a large number of weaker earthquakes beneath the active lava dome. In addition, intermittent spasmodic tremor was recorded during 11-16 January.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Itar-Tass News


21 May-27 May 2003

Seismicity continued to be above background levels at Shiveluch during 16-23 May. Weak, shallow earthquakes were recorded and seismic data indicated that an ash-and-gas explosion reached a height of about 4 km above the lava dome. Incandescent lava avalanches may have occurred on 17 May. Intermittent, spasmodic, volcanic tremor was recorded during 14-22 May. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 May-20 May 2003

During 9-16 May at Shiveluch seismicity was above background levels, and several small explosions occurred. Weak shallow earthquakes were recorded, and seismic data suggested that 6 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 1.5 km above the lava dome and hot avalanches possibly occurred. On 11 May seismic data indicated that two ash-and-gas explosions rose to 6 km a.s.l. and were possibly accompanied by hot avalanches. Video data revealed a series of ash explosions beginning on 14 May at 1550 that produced ash clouds to heights of 4.2 km a.s.l. The explosions were accompanied by several pyroclastic flows. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 April-29 April 2003

A 25 April report on Shiveluch from KVERT stated that, based on seismic data a hot pyroclastic avalanche possibly took place on 23 April. Also, a M 2.25 earthquake occurred this day. Intermittent spasmodic volcanic tremor registered all week. According to visual data from Klyuchi, an ash plume rose 1,500 m above the dome on 24 April; gas and steam plumes rose 50-500 m above the dome on 19-21 and 24 April and the plumes blew 10 km to the E and SE, respectively. Clouds typically obscured the volcano on the other days.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 April-15 April 2003

Seismicity at Shiveluch remained above background levels during 4-11 April. Seismic data indicated that 8 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights up to 3 km above the lava dome and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Weak shallow earthquakes and intermittent spasmodic volcanic tremor were recorded. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to low levels above the dome. A thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 April-8 April 2003

Seismicity at Shiveluch remained above background levels during 28 March to 4 April. Seismic data indicated that 10 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights up to 4 km above the lava dome and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Weak shallow earthquakes and intermittent spasmodic volcanic tremor were registered. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to 1.5 km above the dome. Thermal anomalies and ash deposits were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 March-1 April 2003

During 21-28 March, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Seismic data indicated that one ash-and-gas explosion reached ~1 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Spasmodic volcanic tremor was recorded and gas-and-steam plumes rose to 900 m above the lava dome. During the report period, thermal anomalies and gas-and-steam plumes were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 March-25 March 2003

During 14-21 March, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Seismic data indicated that eight ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 1 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Spasmodic volcanic tremor was recorded and gas-and-steam plumes rose to 1.2 km above the lava dome. During the report period, thermal anomalies and gas-and-steam plumes were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 March-18 March 2003

During 7-14 March, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Seismic data indicated that 13 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 2.3 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Spasmodic volcanic tremor was recorded and gas-and-steam plumes rose to 800 m above the lava dome. During the report period, thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery and on 9 March ash deposits were seen extending ~20 km WSW. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 March-11 March 2003

During 28 February to 7 March, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch and many shallow earthquakes were recorded. Seismic data indicated that 20 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 4 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Volcanic spasmodic tremor was recorded and gas-and-steam plumes rose to 1 km a.s.l. Seismic data indicated that ash explosions on 4 March during 1130-1140 produced clouds to 5.5 km a.s.l. At this time a "water flow" washed away the Klyuchi-Ust'-Kamchatsk road in an area 40 km from the town of Klyuchi. The "water flow" was up to 0.7 m deep. On 6 March seismic data indicated that an explosion produced an ash cloud to 8.5 km a.s.l. During the report period, thermal anomalies were visible on satellite data. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 February-4 March 2003

During 21-28 February, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch and many shallow earthquakes were recorded. Seismic data indicated that 14 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 3 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Video footage showed several ash-and-gas clouds, with the highest cloud rising to 4.5 km a.s.l on 25 February. Volcanic spasmodic tremor occurred and gas-and-steam plumes rose to 4 km a.s.l. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 February-25 February 2003

During 14-21 February, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch and many shallow earthquakes were recorded. Seismic data indicated that 17 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 1.5 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Video footage showed several ash-and-gas clouds, with the highest cloud rising to 6.5 km a.s.l on 15 February accompanied by pyroclastic flows. Volcanic spasmodic tremor occurred and gas-and-steam plumes rose to 1 km above the crater. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 February-18 February 2003

During 7-14 February, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch and many shallow earthquakes were recorded. Seismic data indicated that 10 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 1 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Volcanic spasmodic tremor occurred and gas-and-steam plumes rose to 1 km above the crater. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 February-11 February 2003

During 31 January to 7 February, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch and many shallow earthquakes were recorded. Intermittent volcanic spasmodic tremor occurred and gas-and-steam plumes rose to 1.5 km above the crater. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 January-4 February 2003

During 24-31 January, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch and many shallow earthquakes were recorded. According to seismic data, on 25 January a short-lived explosion produced an ash-and-gas plume that rose to 3.5 km above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 January-28 January 2003

During 17-24 January, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Seismic data indicated that 11 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 2 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Continuous, spasmodic volcanic tremor was recorded on 16-18 January and intermittent volcanic tremor was recorded on 19-23 January. Clouds obscured the volcano all week. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 January-21 January 2003

During 10-17 January, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Seismic data indicated that 12 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 2 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to 800 m above the lava dome and drifted E and NW during 10-12 January. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


8 January-14 January 2003

During 3-10 January, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Seismic data indicated that 11 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 1.5 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Short-lived explosions produced ash-and-gas clouds to 1.5 km above the lava dome. On 9 January a small, hot avalance was seen on the SW slope of the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


31 December-6 January 2003

During 27 December to 3 January, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Seismic data indicated that 25 ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 2 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. On 28 December a small amount of ash was visible on the volcano's snow-covered flanks. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 December-30 December 2002

During 20-27 December, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Seismic data indicated that six ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 2-3 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. Several smaller earthquakes at depths of 0-6 km were recorded. Weak, intermittent, spasmodic tremor was registered during 21-25 December. On 25 December during 1945-2045, the amplitude of volcanic tremor sharply increased. According to visual data from Klyuchi, on 19 December at 1238 and 1514, short-lived explosions sent gas-and-ash plumes to heights of ~5.5 and 5 km a.s.l., respectively. Following the first explosion, pyroclastic flows traveled SE; after the second, they traveled to the S, inside the Baidarnaya River. The runout of both pyroclastic flows was 3 km. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 December-24 December 2002

During 13-20 December, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Seismic data indicated that seven ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 1-2 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. A number of smaller earthquakes at depths of 0-6 km and weak intermittent spasmodic tremor was recorded. On 19 December around 0045 a pyroclastic flow traveled ~3 km down Shiveluch's SE slope. The associated plume rose 5.5 km a.sl. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 December-17 December 2002

During 6-13 December, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch, but it decreased after 8 December. Seismic data indicated that eight ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 1-2 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. A number of smaller earthquakes at depths of 0-6 km and weak intermittent spasmodic tremor was recorded. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to a maximum height of 1.5 km above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 December-10 December 2002

Seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch, but decreased during 29 November to 6 December. Seismic data indicated that nine ash-and-gas explosions reached heights of 1-2 km above the lava dome, and hot avalanches possibly occurred. A number of smaller earthquakes at depths of 0-6 km were recorded. Weak intermittent spasmodic tremor was recorded on 28-30 November. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to a maximum height of 2.5 km above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 November-3 December 2002

During 22-29 November, KVERT decreased the Concern Color Code at Shiveluch from Orange to Yellow. Seismicity remained above background levels during the report interval and seismic data indicated that there had been hot avalanches and eight ash-and-gas explosions in which clouds reached 1-2 km above the lava dome (the previous week there were 19 ash-and-gas explosions to 2-3 km above the lava dome). Weak intermittent spasmodic tremor was registered during 24-25 November. Gas-and-steam plumes were seen rising 100-800 m above the lava dome and thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 November-26 November 2002

During 14-20 November, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. During this interval, seismic data indicated that there had been hot avalanches and 19 ash-and-gas explosions in which clouds reached 2-3 km above the lava dome. Weak intermittent spasmodic tremor was registered during 14-17 November. Ash-and-gas plumes were seen rising to ~2 km a.s.l. and thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 November-19 November 2002

During 11-14 November, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. During this interval, seismic data indicated that there had been hot avalanches and seven ash-and-gas explosions in which clouds reached 2-3 km above the lava dome. Weak intermittent spasmodic tremor was registered. According to seismic data, possible short-lived explosions sent ash-and-gas plumes to heights of 5.5 km above the dome. Gas-and-steam plumes were seen rising to ~800 m a.s.l. and thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 November-12 November 2002

KVERT raised the Concern Color Code at Shiveluch from Yellow to Orange on 11 November. Visual observations revealed that on the 4th at 1020, the 5th at 0830, and the 6th at 1318, short-lived explosions sent ash-and-gas plumes to heights of approximately 3.5, 1.5, and 2 km above the dome, respectively. During 8-11 November, seismicity remained above background levels. Thermal anomalies and a faint ~11-km-long plume (on the 8th) were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. Seismic data on the 11th indicated possible hot avalanches and several ash-and-gas explosions sending clouds up to 5.5 km above the dome.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 October-5 November 2002

During 25 October to 1 November, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. During this interval, seismic data indicated that there had been hot avalanches and eight ash-and-gas explosions in which clouds reached 2 km above the lava dome. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to ~2.5 km a.s.l. and thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 October-29 October 2002

During 18-25 October seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch, but the number of earthquakes decreased. During this interval, seismic data indicated that there had been hot avalanches and 10 ash-and-gas explosions in which clouds reached 1 km above the lava dome. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to ~4.5 km a.s.l. and thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 October-22 October 2002

During 11-18 October, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Four earthquakes occurred with magnitudes 2-2.2, as well as many smaller ones. During this interval, seismic data indicated that there had been hot avalanches and 13 ash-and-gas explosions in which clouds reached 1-2.5 km above the lava dome. Intermittent spasmodic tremor was recorded all week. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to 2 km above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 October-15 October 2002

During 4-11 October, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Seven earthquakes with magnitudes 2-2.4 occurred, as well as many smaller ones. During this interval, seismic data suggested there had been hot avalanches and 16 ash-and-gas explosions in which clouds reached 1-2 km above the lava dome. Intermittent spasmodic tremor was recorded. Gas-and-steam plumes were visible rising to 1 km above the lava dome. On the evening of the 6th, incandescence was visible at the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 October-8 October 2002

During 26 September to 4 October, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Eleven earthquakes with magnitudes 2-2.7 occurred, as well as many smaller ones. During this interval, seismic data suggested there had been hot avalanches and 38 ash-and-gas explosions in which clouds reached 1-2.5 km above the lava dome. During 30 September to 2 October intermittent spasmodic volcanic tremor was recorded. Video images on 26 September at 1406 and 1759 showed short-lived explosions of ash and gas rising ~2.5 and 0.5 km above the dome, respectively. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 September-1 October 2002

During 20-27 September, volcanic and seismic activity at Shiveluch were above background levels. There were four earthquakes with magnitudes 2-2.1, and many smaller ones. Seismic data indicated possible avalanches and ash-and-gas explosions that may have sent material to 5.5 km a.s.l. On 25 September continuous spasmodic volcanic tremor was recorded for 27 minutes. Short-lived gas-and-steam plumes were observed rising to 6.5 km a.s.l. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery during several days, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 September-24 September 2002

During 13-20 September, volcanic and seismic activity at Shiveluch were above background levels. There were eight earthquakes with magnitudes 2-2.3, and many smaller ones. Seismic data indicated possible avalanches and ash-and-gas explosions that may have sent material to 3 km above the lava dome. On 14 September continuous spasmodic volcanic tremor was recorded for about 40 minutes. Short-lived ash-and-gas plumes were observed rising to 3 km above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery during several days, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 September-17 September 2002

During 6-13 September, volcanic and seismic activity at Shiveluch were above background levels. There were eight earthquakes with magnitudes 2-2.2, and many smaller ones. Seismic data indicated possible avalanches and ash-and-gas explosions that may have sent material to 3 km above the lava dome. Volcanic tremor continued to slowly decrease. Short-lived ash-and-gas plumes were observed rising to 3.5 km above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery during several days, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 September-10 September 2002

During 30 August- 6 September, volcanic and seismic activity at Shiveluch were at similar levels to the previous week. Seismicity remained above background levels, with the occurrence of four earthquakes with magnitudes 2-2.1, and many smaller ones. Seismic data indicated possible avalanches and ash-and-gas explosions that may have sent material 2-2.5 km above the lava dome. Volcanic tremor continued to slowly decrease. On 2 September, a ~15-minute-long episode of strong high-frequency tremor was registered that may have been indicative of an avalanche rolling down the side of the dome. Gas-and-steam plumes rose to 2 km above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 August-3 September 2002

During 23-30 August, volcanic and seismic activity at Shiveluch were at similar levels to the previous week. Seismicity remained above background levels, with the occurrence of three earthquakes with magnitudes 1.7-2.1, and many smaller ones. Seismic data indicated possible avalanches and ash-and-gas explosions that may have sent material 1-2.5 km above the lava dome. Volcanic tremor decreased in comparison to the previous week. Gas-and-steam plumes rose 1-1.2 km above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 August-27 August 2002

During 16-23 August, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch, although only three earthquakes with magnitudes of 1.7-1.9 occurred. A number of smaller 0- to 6-km-deep earthquakes were registered, as well as many other local shallow seismic signals. The signals were possibly indicative of avalanches and ash-and-gas explosions (one to three per day reached heights of 1-1.5 km above the dome). Volcanic tremor continued at previous levels. Ash-and-gas plumes rose to a maximum height of 4 km above the dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 August-20 August 2002

During 9-16 August, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch with about 10 earthquakes occurring with magnitudes 1.7-2.4 and a number of smaller earthquakes at depths of 0-6 km. In addition, many other local shallow seismic signals were registered, which possibly indicated ash-and-gas explosions (one to three per day to heights of 1.5-2.5 km above the dome). Avalanches were also registered. Seismicity decreased slightly by the end of the week. On several days thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. The Concern Color Code was reduced from Orange ("explosive eruption is possible within a few days and may occur with little or no warning") to Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 August-13 August 2002

During 2-9 August, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. More than ten M 1.8-2.5 earthquakes occurred and there were a number of smaller ones at depths of 0-6 km. Other local shallow seismic signals occurred, which possibly indicated ash-poor explosions (one to five per day to heights of 1.5-3 km above the dome). In addition, avalanches were registered and volcanic tremor decreased slightly. Ash-poor plumes rose to a maximum height of 3 km above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. KVERT increased the Concern Color Code from Yellow ("volcano is restless") to Orange ("explosive eruption is possible within a few days and may occur with little or no warning").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


31 July-6 August 2002

During 27 July-2 August, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch and a lava dome grew in the active crater. Individual earthquakes of M 1.9-2.4, as well as a number of smaller earthquakes at depths of 0-6 km, were recorded. Other local seismic signals indicated that possible weak, ash-poor explosions rose to 1 km above the dome. Avalanches were also registered. Volcanic tremor increased in intensity on 29 July and remained high until 1 August. Tremor gradually decreased in amplitude during 1-2 August. Gas-and-steam emissions, some possibly including small amounts of fine ash, rose to ~1.5 km above the lava dome. On 30 July a short-lived explosion sent ash-and-gas plumes to ~3 km above the dome. Thermal anomalies of 1-4 pixels were visible on satellite images. On 28 July and 1 August, small steam-and-aerosol plumes were visible extending to the S and 35 km to the NW, respectively. KVERT decreased the Concern Color Code from Orange ("explosive eruption is possible within a few days and may occur with little or no warning") to Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 July-30 July 2002

During 19-26 July, seismicity remained above background levels at Shiveluch. Individual earthquakes up to M 1.9, as well as a number of smaller earthquakes at depths of 0-6 km, were recorded. Other local seismic signals indicated that possible weak, ash-poor explosions rose to 1 km above the dome. Avalanches were also registered. Gas-and-steam emissions, some possibly including small amounts of fine ash, rose to ~1.5 km above the lava dome. A small, likely ash-rich plume was visible on AVHRR satellite imagery on 22 July at 1804. The plume appeared to be centered over the volcano's summit at a height of about 5.3 km. On 29 July at 2000 the intensity of volcanic tremor increased noticeably in comparison with the previous few days. On 30 July at 0946 a short-lived explosion produced a plume to a height of ~3 km above the dome. KVERT raised the Concern Color Code from Yellow ("volcano is restless") to Orange ("explosive eruption is possible within a few days and may occur with little or no warning").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 July-23 July 2002

During 12-19 July, seismicity slightly increased and remained above background levels. After a nearly 3-week-long hiatus, individual earthquakes with magnitudes between 1.8 and 2.0 began to occur again. In addition, smaller earthquakes were detected at depths of 0-6 km. There were many other local shallow seismic signals, which possibly indicated weak ash-poor explosions up to 1 km above the dome. Avalanches were also registered. During the week the level of volcanic tremor continued to increase constantly and gas-and-steam emissions rose to 2 km above the dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 July-16 July 2002

During 5-12 July, seismicity generally continued to decline at Shiveluch, but remained above background levels. Earthquakes less than M 1.7 occurred at depths of 0-6 km accompanied by many local shallow seismic signals from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions. During the report period the level of volcanic tremor increased; there was a tremor episode on the 9th from 0510 to 0540 in which the amplitude sharply increased to 10 times the previous level. Several short-lived explosions produced ash-and-gas plumes ~1-1.5 km above the lava dome. Some explosions were accompanied by rock avalanches and pyroclastic flows. Gas-and-steam plumes rose 0.2-1.5 km above the dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 July-9 July 2002

During 28 June to 5 July, seismicity continued to decline at Shiveluch, but remained above background levels. It included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 1.7 at depths of 0-6 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Gas-and-steam plumes reached to 2 km above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery, but ash was not. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 June-2 July 2002

Seismicity declined at Shiveluch during 21-28 June, but remained above background levels. It included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 1.9 at depths of 0-6 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Gas-and-steam plumes reached to 3 km above the lava dome and small avalanches were captured on video rolling down the dome on 23 June. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery, but ash was not. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 June-25 June 2002

During 14-21 June, seismicity at Shiveluch remained above background levels and included earthquakes at depths of 0-6 km with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.4 on the 14th and less than or equal to 2 during the rest of the week. In addition, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions) and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor occurred. According to interpretations of seismic data, short-lived explosive eruptions on the 15th and 19th probably sent ash-and-gas plumes ~1 and 1.5 km above the lava dome, respectively. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery, but ash was not. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 June-18 June 2002

During 7-14 June, seismicity at Shiveluch remained above background levels and included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.3 at depths of 0-6 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. According to interpretations of seismic data, from one to three short-lived explosive eruptions per day probably sent ash-and-gas plumes ~1 km above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery, but ash was not. The Concern Color Code was reduced from Orange ("volcano is in eruption or eruption may occur at any time") to Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 June-11 June 2002

During 2-7 June, several short-lived explosive eruptions per day sent ash-and-gas plumes 0.7-1 km above the lava dome, gas-and-steam plumes rose to 2.5 km above the dome, and seismicity was above background levels. Seismicity included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.3 at depths of 0-6 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange ("volcano is in eruption or eruption may occur at any time").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 May-4 June 2002

Due to an increase in volcanic and seismic activity at Shiveluch, KVERT raised the Concern Color Code from Yellow ("volcano is restless") to Orange ("volcano is in eruption or eruption may occur at any time"). On 1 June at 1616 a short-lived explosive eruption produced an ash-and-gas plume to a height of 3 km above the lava dome. The plume was visible from Klyuchi town, 46 km from Shiveluch. Two ~3-minute-long shallow seismic events were recorded at 1615 and 1626. Prior to the eruption, on 31 May at 1530, a ML (local magnitude) 3.1 earthquake occurred. On 1 June continuous volcanic tremor occurred for about an hour. Small gas-and-steam plumes rose to 1.3 km above the dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery on 31 May and 1 June.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 May-28 May 2002

During 17-24 May, there were several small emissions of gas, steam, and ash at Shiveluch. Weak earthquakes occurred at depths of 0-6 km, accompanied by many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions). There were also episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 May-21 May 2002

During 10-17 May, there were several small emissions of gas, steam, and ash at Shiveluch. Seismicity included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.1 at depths of 0-6 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


8 May-14 May 2002

During 3-10 May, there were several small emissions of gas, steam, and ash at Shiveluch. A short-lived eruption on 5 May at 0945 produced an ash-and-gas plume that rose 1.5 km above the lava dome and was accompanied by a 4-minute-long shallow seismic event. Seismicity during the report period included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.1 at depths of 0-6 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


1 May-7 May 2002

During 26 April-3 May, there were several small emissions of gas and steam at Shiveluch. The character of seismicity changed in comparison to the previous week, with more deep earthquakes occuring and no significant events indicating explosions were registered. There were earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.0 at depths of 0-9 km, many local shallow seismic signals, and intermittent episodes of weak volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery. On 5 May at 0945 an ash plume rose 1.5 km above the lava dome. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 April-30 April 2002

During 19-26 April, there were several emissions of gas, steam, and ash. The highest rising ash cloud reached 800 m above the volcano and visual observations suggested that rockfalls probably accompanied the eruption. Seismicity decreased slightly during the report period; there were earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.0 at depths of 0-5 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions), and intermittent episodes of weak volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 April-23 April 2002

During 12-19 April, gas-and-steam and ash-and-gas emissions occurred at Shiveluch and seismicity remained above background levels. A short-lived explosive eruption on 15 April at 1906 produced an ash-and-gas plume that rose 1 km above the volcano. Seismicity during the report period included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.3 at depths of 0-5 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 April-16 April 2002

During 29 March-5 April, gas-and-steam and ash-and-gas emissions occurred at Shiveluch and seismicity remained above background levels. A short-lived explosive eruption on 10 April at 0900 produced an ash-and-gas plume that rose 1 km above the volcano. Seismicity during the report period included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.1 at depths of 0-9 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 April-9 April 2002

During 29 March-5 April, several gas-and-steam and ash-and-gas emissions occurred at Shiveluch. In addition, seismicity decreased in comparison to previous weeks, but remained above background levels. The highest rising ash-and-gas plume observed was produced from a short-lived explosive eruption on 30 March at 2042. Seismicity during the report period included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.1 at depths of 0-10 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-and-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 March-2 April 2002

During 23-29 March, seismicity and volcanism continued at Shiveluch. Ash-and-gas plumes were observed from the town of Klyuchi rising to 2.5 km above the lava dome during 25-27 March. According to seismic data, on 23 March short-lived explosive eruptions sent ash-and-gas plumes to 5 km above the dome. Seismicity included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.4 at depths of 0-5 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 March-26 March 2002

A decrease in the level of activity at Shiveluch during 15-22 March led KVERT to reduce the Concern Color Code from Orange ("eruption may occur at anytime") to Yellow ("volcano is restless"). During the week, several gas-and-steam eruption clouds rose 300-1,500 m above the volcano's lava dome. Seismicity included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.2 at depths of 0-9 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were observed on AVHRR satellite imagery and no ash was detected.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 March-19 March 2002

During 8-15 March, volcanic activity at Shiveluch continued and seismicity decreased, but remained above background levels. The highest rising observed gas-and-steam plume reached a height of 2.5 km above the volcano on the 13th. Seismicity included earthquakes with magnitudes less than or equal to 2.1 at depths of 0-9 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies that were 2-4 pixels large were visible on satellite imagery. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange ("volcano is in eruption or eruption may occur at any time").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 March-12 March 2002

During 1-8 March, volcanic activity remained relatively high at Shiveluch. Four short-lived explosive eruptions visible from the town of Klyuchi, 46 km from the volcano, produced ash-and-gas plumes to heights of 1-3 km above the volcano's lava dome. On 3 March at 1500 a mixture of red ash and snow fell in Klyuchi. The ash may have been produced from an eruption at 1447. Seismicity included earthquakes with magnitudes less than 2.4 at depths of 0-5 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. The volcano remained at Color Concern Code Orange ("volcano is in eruption or eruption may occur at any time").

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Vladivostok News


27 February-5 March 2002

During 22 February-1 March seismic and volcanic activity remained high at Shiveluch; several steam-and-gas and ash-and-gas eruptions occurred, pyroclastic flows travelled down the volcano's flanks, and seismicity remained above background levels. The highest rising ash-and-gas clouds were produced from eruptions on 27 and 28 February, and 1 March; the clouds reached a height of ~2 km. During the week, pyroclastic flows travelled as far as 2 km down the SE side of the lava dome. Seismicity included earthquakes with magnitudes less than 2.3 at depths of 0-5 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. On the 22nd and the 27th, 1-hour and 45-minute-long series, respectively, of shallow seismic events were registered that may have been associated with pyroclastic flows or gas-and-ash explosions. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. The volcano remained at Color Concern Code Orange ("volcano is in eruption or eruption may occur at any time").

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 February-26 February 2002

Volcanic unrest continued at Shiveluch during 15-22 February, with several ash-and-gas explosions occurring and seismicity remaining above background levels. An eruption on 15 February at 1501 produced an ash cloud accompanied by pyroclastic flows that travelled 2.5 km down the SE slope of the dome. The highest rising observed ash cloud was produced by an eruption on 19 February at 0800; it reached a height of 3.5-4 km above the lava dome. Seismicity included earthquakes with magnitudes less than 2.4 at depths of 0-5 km, many local shallow seismic signals (from possible avalanches or weak gas-ash explosions), and episodes of weak intermittent volcanic tremor. Thermal anomalies and ash clouds were visible on satellite imagery. The volcano remained at Color Concern Code Orange ("volcano is in eruption or eruption may occur at any time").

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 February-19 February 2002

During 8-15 February volcanism increased at Shiveluch and KVERT raised the Color Concern Code on 15 February from Yellow ("volcano is restless") to Orange ("volcano is in eruption or eruption may occur at any time"). During the report period seismicity was above background levels, thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, and several gas-and-ash eruptions occurred. The highest rising gas-and-ash cloud was produced from an eruption on 14 February at 0835; it reached ~ 3 km above the volcano's dome. A short-lived eruption on 15 February at 1501 produced a gas-and-ash plume that rose to 2 km above the dome and pyroclastic flows that extended 2.5 km to the SE. During 1613-1725 the same day, a dense ash plume continuously rose to 2 km above the dome. The Tokyo VAAC received a report that an eruption on 19 February at 1443 produced an ash cloud that reached a height of ~6.7 km above the volcano and drifted to the ESE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 February-12 February 2002

During 1-8 February seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch with many shallow earthquakes occurring within the volcano's edifice. Shallow, weak seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were also registered. Small explosions produced low-rising gas-and-steam plumes throughout the week. On 2 February short-lived explosions produced an ash-and-gas cloud that rose ~1.5 km above the dome. The eruption was accompanied by an increase in shallow seismic events and hot rock avalanches.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 January-5 February 2002

Seismicity was above background levels at Shiveluch during 26-31 January, but on 1 February at 1859 it increased. During the following 2 hours spasmodic tremor occurred and seismic data suggested that an ash-and-gas plume rose to 2.5 km above the lava dome. Afterwards, seismicity returned to levels seen before the increase. During 25 January-2 February several clouds composed of ash, steam, and/or gas were seen, with the highest rising 2 km above the dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. The Color Concern Code remained at Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 January-29 January 2002

A decrease in seismicity over several days led KVERT to reduce the Concern Color Code at Shiveluch on 23 January to Yellow ("volcano is restless") from Orange ("volcano is in eruption or eruption may occur at any time"). During 18-25 January several small steam-and-gas emissions occurred, with the highest plume rising 800 m above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 January-22 January 2002

On 17 January, increased seismic energy release prompted KVERT to increase the Color Concern Code at Shiveluch to Orange ("volcano is in eruption or eruption may occur at any time") from Yellow ("volcano is restless"). During 11-18 January the total number of earthquakes within Shiveluch's edifice decreased, but the energy of individual earthquakes increased (up to ~M 3). In addition, weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. Seismic data indicated the occurrence of more intense possible gas-and-ash explosions than occurred during previous weeks. During 13-14 and 15-16 January, gas-and-steam plumes rose 1-1.5 km above the lava dome. On 14 January, a plume extended more than 10 km SE, and rock avalanches were visible continuously rolling down the dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 January-15 January 2002

During 4-11 January, about 40 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than or equal to 1.7 occurred, and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. The total number of earthquakes within the volcano's edifice increased during the week. Several small explosions produced steam-and-gas plumes, with the highest reported plume rising ~1 km above the dome on 5 January. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery, but ash was not. The Color Concern Code remained at Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 January-8 January 2002

During 28 December-4 January seismicity increased at Shiveluch; about 70 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than or equal to 1.7 occurred in comparison to 20 the previous week. Shallow, weak seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were also registered. Small explosions produced low-rising gas-and-steam plumes, but no ash was visible on satellite imagery. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. The Color Concern Code remained at Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 December-1 January 2002

During 21-28 December, about 20 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than or equal to 1.7 occurred, and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. Seismicity decreased slightly, but remained above background levels. Small gas-and-steam plumes rose above the lava dome. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. The Color Concern Code remained at Yellow ("volcano is restless").

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 December-25 December 2001

During 14-21 December, more than 40 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than or equal to 1.7 occurred, and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. The largest earthquake was M 3. Several gas-and-steam plumes were produced from explosions, with the highest reported plume rising 3.5 km above the lava dome on 20 December at 1618 and drifting to the W. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 December-18 December 2001

During 7-14 December more than 40 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than or equal to 1.7 occurred, and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. On 8, 10, and 13 December gas-and-steam plumes rose 1-2 km above the dome. Thermal anomalies in the active dome area were visible on satellite imagery. The volcano remained at Color Concern Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 December-11 December 2001

A lava dome continued to grow in Shiveluch's active crater, and seismic activity remained above background levels. Many weak, shallow earthquakes occurred within the volcano's edifice, along with about 30 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than or equal to 1.7. Other local shallow seismic events (possible collapses, avalanches, or possible weak gas-ash explosions) and episodes of weak volcanic tremor were registered. During 1 December, a gas-and-steam plume rose 400 m above the dome and extended 5 km to the E and NW. According to visual reports from Klyuchi town, at 0910 a short-lived explosive eruption sent an ash plume to ~2 km above the dome. This explosion was visible by airplane pilots. Several thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery.The volcano remained at Color Concern Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 November-4 December 2001

During 23-30 November a lava dome continued to grow in Shiveluch's active crater, and small eruptions produced gas-and-steam clouds. The highest reported gas-and-steam cloud rose to 1.3 km above the dome on 27 November. Thermal anomalies in the active dome area were visible on satellite imagery. About 35 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than or equal to 1.7 occurred and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. The volcano remained at Color Concern Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 November-27 November 2001

During 16-23 November a lava dome continued to grow in Shiveluch's active crater, and several eruptions produced ash, steam, and gas clouds. The highest reported ash cloud rose to 1-2 km above the dome on 19 November. Thermal anomalies in the active dome area were visible on satellite imagery. About 60 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than or equal to 1.7 occurred and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. KVERT reduced the Color Concern Code from Orange to Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 November-20 November 2001

During 9-16 November a lava dome continued to grow in Shiveluch's active crater and several steam, gas, and ash explosions occurred. Seismic data suggested emissions from these explosions rose to a maximum height of ~4 km above the dome. A short-lived explosion on 9 November at 1200 produced an ash plume that was observed from Klyuchi, ~46 km from the volcano, rising ~1 km above the dome. The same day, during 1750-1810 incandescence was visible on the SE flank of the volcano 50 m below the summit. Thermal anomalies in the active dome area and ash clouds were visible on satellite imagery. Spasmodic volcanic tremor and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. The intensity of volcanic tremor noticeably diminished during the week.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 November-13 November 2001

During 2-9 November a lava dome continued to grow in Shiveluch's active crater, and several eruptions produced ash, steam, and gas clouds. Inclement weather prevented visual observations of several possible gas-and-ash eruptions on 7 November. However, seismic data suggested these eruptions produced clouds that rose to 6.5-7.5 km. During 1630-1720 ash fell in Klyuchi town ~46 km from the volcano. A thermal anomaly in the active dome area was visible on satellite imagery on 2 November. Spasmodic volcanic tremor and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. The intensity of volcanic tremor continued to grow slowly during the report period.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


31 October-6 November 2001

During 26 October-2 November, a lava dome continued to grow in Shiveluch's active crater. The evening of 29-30 October incandescent avalanches were observed travelling down the W and SW slopes of the lava dome. Gas-and-steam plumes rose ~1.5 km above the dome on 30 and 31 October. Thermal anomalies in the active dome area were visible on satellite imagery. Spasmodic volcanic tremor and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. The intensity of volcanic tremor was greater than the previous week. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 October-30 October 2001

During 19-26 October, a lava dome continued to grow in Shiveluch's active crater. An explosion during 22-23 October produced a steam-and-gas plume visible from the town of Klyuchi, 46 km from the volcano, rising 4-4.2 km a.s.l. Thermal anomalies in the active dome area were visible on satellite imagery. Spasmodic volcanic tremor and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. The number of weak shallow seismic events and the intensity of volcanic tremor slowly increased. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 October-23 October 2001

During 12-19 October, a lava dome continued to grow in Shiveluch's active crater and several gas-and-steam plumes were observed. The highest reported gas-and-steam plume was produced by an explosion on 17 October at 1740; it rose 1.2 km above the dome and extended 3 km to the W. Thermal anomalies in the active dome area were visible on satellite imagery. Spasmodic volcanic tremor and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 October-16 October 2001

During 6-12 October a lava dome continued to grow in Shiveluch's active crater, and several eruptions produced ash and steam-and-gas clouds. The highest reported steam-and-gas cloud was produced from an eruption on 9 October at 1630 and rose 2 km above the dome. On 10 October at 2250 the reflection from incandescent lava was visible on the dome. Short pyroclastic flows and 400-m-high ash plumes were produced from small explosions on 11 October at 1515 and 1610. Thermal anomalies in the active dome area were visible on satellite imagery. Spasmodic volcanic tremor and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 October-9 October 2001

During 28 September to 6 October a lava dome continued to grow in Shiveluch's active crater, and several eruptions produced ash and steam-and-gas clouds. The highest reported ash clouds were produced from eruptions on 1 October at 1641 and 1654. The ash plumes rose to 7 and 7.5 km above the volcano, respectively, and deposited a few millimeters of ash in Klyuchi town, 46 km from the volcano. An eruption the same day at 2210 produced a mushroom-shaped ash cloud that rose to ~3 km above the volcano and extended ~10 km SE. On the evening of 3 October incandescence was visible at the dome. Thermal anomalies in the active dome area were visible on satellite imagery. Spasmodic volcanic tremor and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. Shiveluch remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 September-2 October 2001

During 28-29 September seismic activity was above background levels and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. Several small explosions occurred on 30 September, sending ash clouds to the following heights above the dome: 2.5 km at 1323, 3.5 km at 1719, 2.5 km at 1755, and 4.5 km at 1807. An explosion at 2010 produced an umbrella-shaped ash cloud that rose 9 km above the lava dome and extended ~9 km E to W. Large pyroclastic flows traveled ~5 km to the SE. The same day the Concern Color Code was raised from Orange to Red. During 28-30 September thermal anomalies in the active dome area were visible on satellite imagery. Following the eruption, during 30 September at 2100 to 1 October at 0900, seismic activity decreased and the view of the volcano was obscured by clouds. AVHRR satellite imagery at 0757 showed that the ~25-km-diameter ash cloud remained centered over the volcano. On 1 October the Concern Color Code was reduced back to Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), China Daily.com


19 September-25 September 2001

During 14-21 September several steam-and-gas clouds were observed, as were ash clouds produced from explosions at Shiveluch, with the highest ash cloud rising 1.1 km above the lava dome. During the week hot avalanches from the summit of the dome were also noted. Seismic activity was above background levels and spasmodic volcanic tremor and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. Thermal anomalies in the active dome area were visible on satellite imagery. Shiveluch remained at Color Concern Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 September-18 September 2001

During 7-14 September several gas-and-ash plumes produced from explosions at Shiveluch were observed, with the highest rising 1.2 km above the dome. On 11 September several hot avalanches were observed travelling from the top of the lava dome. On 12 September explosions produced a short pyroclastic flow and an ash plume that rose to 1 km above the dome. During the week, seismic activity was above background levels and spasmodic volcanic tremor and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 September-11 September 2001

Seismic activity was above background levels during 31 August-7 September. Spasmodic volcanic tremor and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered the entire week. Several gas-and-steam plumes were observed, with the highest rising 1.2 km above the dome. On 4 September an explosion produced an ash plume that rose 1 km above the dome and a 1-km-long pyroclastic flow that traveled to the SE. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 August-4 September 2001

Seismic activity was above background levels during 24-31 August. Weak shallow earthquakes within the volcano's edifice and signals that may have represented short-lived explosions were recorded. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 August-28 August 2001

Seismic activity was above background levels during the week. Spasmodic volcanic tremor and weak, shallow seismic signals (possible collapses and avalanches) were registered. Several small explosions produced gas-and-steam plumes that rose to a maximum height of 2 km above the dome. Pyroclastic flows traveled down the flanks of the volcano following an explosion on 23 August. Thermal anomalies were visible on satellite imagery. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 August-21 August 2001

Seismic activity remained above background levels during the week and included several small earthquakes. On 15 August volcanic tremor decreased gradually to background levels. Observers in Klyuchi reported that on 11 August gas-and-steam plumes rose 1.2-1.5 km above the dome. Several thermal anomalies were recorded on satellite imagery, as well as a gas-and-steam plume extending 75 km SE. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


8 August-14 August 2001

During the week seismic activity remained above background levels, with many small earthquakes occurring within the volcano's edifice and several different seismic signals (explosion, avalanche, collapse) recorded locally. Small gas-and-steam plumes rose to 200 m above the dome. Thermal anomalies were seen in several areas on satellite imagery. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


1 August-7 August 2001

During the week seismic activity remained above background levels, with many small earthquakes occurring within the volcano's edifice and several different seismic signals (explosion, avalanche, collapse) recorded locally. The level of continuous spasmodic volcanic tremor increased on 28 July and again on 30 July. Gas-and-steam plumes were observed rising to a maximum height of 1 km above the dome and on the night of 1 August ash fell in the town of Klyuchi, 46 km from the volcano. One- to three-pixel thermal anomalies were occasionally visible in satellite imagery. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 July-31 July 2001

During the week seismic activity remained above background levels, with many small earthquakes occurring within the volcano's edifice and many different seismic signals (explosion, avalanche, collapse) recorded locally. Gas-and-steam plumes were observed from Klyuchi town and the highest cloud rose to 2 km above the lava dome. One- to three-pixel anomalies were occasionally visible on AVHRR imagery near the SW flank of the volcano. The volcano remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 July-24 July 2001

A moderate-sized eruption at Shiveluch on 19 July prompted KVERT to raise the Concern Color Code from Yellow to Orange the same day. The eruption occurred at 1033 and produced an ash plume that rose 3 km above the lava dome. Prior to the eruption, during 14 through 16 July, spasmodic volcanic tremor increased several times. On 15 July at 1803 a three-pixel thermal anomaly was visible on AVHRR satellite imagery near the SW flank of the volcano. Also, at 2100 a gas-and-steam plume was observed rising 1.5 km above the dome.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 July-17 July 2001

Seismic activity remained above background levels during 6-13 July. Many small earthquakes were recorded within the volcano's edifice, along with weak spasmodic tremor and other local seismic signals, interpreted as related to explosions, avalanches, and collapses. On 6 July explosions sent ash to 0.6-1 km above the volcano. In addition, hot avalanches and pyroclastic flows were observed during clear conditions to be traveling down the flanks of the volcano. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 July-10 July 2001

During 29 June to 6 July seismic activity remained above background levels, but the level of explosive volcanic activity decreased in comparison to the previous week. On 2 and 3 July a thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery. On 3, 4, and 5 July voluminous gas-and-steam plumes rose 2-2.5 km above the volcano. Due to the decrease in volcanic activity the Concern Color Code at Shiveluch was reduced from Orange to Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 June-3 July 2001

Increases in both seismic activity and explosions at Shiveluch led KVERT to raise the Concern Color Code on 2 July from Yellow to Orange. On 26 June, prior to an increase in seismic activity, a possible thermal anomaly was observed on satellite imagery. The volcanic activity increase may have begun on 28 June at 1500 when the level of volcanic tremor and the number of shallow earthquakes increased. According to reports from observers in the town of Klyuchi (46 km from the volcano) on 29 June at 1150 a short-lived explosion sent an ash-and-gas plume to a height of ~4.5 m a.s.l. During the eruption pyroclastic flows traveled 2.5 to 3 km down the slopes of the volcano. Later in the day and during the next day seismic data suggested that six possible gas-and-ash explosions occurred that produced ash to a maximum height of 8.5 km a.s.l. According to the Tokyo VAAC the largest 30 June explosion began at 0300 and produced an ash plume that ascended to 7.3 km a.s.l. Later during 30 June and 1 July, GOES and other satellite's imagery showed a possible ash cloud drifting over the Bering Sea that may have originated in Kamchatka. According to visual observations from the town of Klyuchi, on 1 July explosions produced ash plumes that rose to 1.5 km above the dome, and at 1250 a short-lived explosion produced an ash-and-gas plume that rose to ~8 km a.s.l and drifted to the E. Pyroclastic flows extended 5 km down the Baidarnaya River.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Pravda News


20 June-26 June 2001

During 15-21 June seismic activity was above background levels. Many small earthquakes occurred within the volcano's edifice and episodes of weak spasmodic volcanic tremor were recorded. Local seismic signals accompanied explosions, avalanches, and collapses. Weak steam, gas, and ash explosions rose to a maximum height of 800 m above the lava dome.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 June-19 June 2001

During 8-14 June seismic activity was above background level at Shiveluch. Many small earthquakes occurred within the volcano's edifice and local seismic signals accompanied explosions, avalanches, and collapses. There were several ash-and-gas eruptions, with the highest eruption cloud reaching up to 2 km above the lava dome. A thermal anomaly was observed on satellite imagery on 8,9, and 10 June. The level of Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 June-12 June 2001

On 5 June a gas-and-steam plume rose 450-1,200 m above the volcano and extended 3-5 km W. A thermal anomaly observed in satellite images on 5 June at 1809 had two saturated pixels (49°C) in a background of 15-25°C. On 6 June at 0756 the anomaly consisted of one pixel at 49.3°C in a background of near 4°C. According to reports from the town of Klyuchi, on 7 June at 1630 an ash-and-gas plume rose 600 m above the dome and extended to the W. At 1650 a short-lived explosion sent an ash-and-gas plume 1,500 m above the volcano accompanied by 3- and 2-minute-long, shallow seismic events. A thermal anomaly was observed in satellite images on 7 June at 1745. Three pixels near saturation (at 44-45°C) stood out from a background of pixels 15-25°C, in addition to a steam-and-ash plume extending to the NW about 33 km. The level of Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), BBC News


30 May-5 June 2001

Volcanic activity decreased following the 22 May eruption, therefore, on 30 May the Concern Color Code was further reduced from Orange to Yellow. During the week several small eruptions produced gas-and-steam plumes that rose up to 1.2 km above the old lava dome. Seismic activity decreased in comparison to the previous week, but remained above background levels.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 May-29 May 2001

On 22 May at 0209 an explosive eruption produced a mushroom-shaped ash column that rose to a height of more than 10 km a.s.l. (preliminary reports stated ~20 km). The high-pressure system over N Kamchatka caused the plume to remain fairly stationary over the region as it spread out to cover an area of ~50,000 km2. Observations from the town of Klyuchi, 46 km from the volcano, revealed that the new lava dome (first observed on 12 May) and the W part of the old dome were destroyed during the eruption. After the 22 May eruption several small eruptions produced ash-and-gas clouds that rose up to 2 km a.s.l. On 23 May a large thermal anomaly was observed at Shiveluch. In satellite imagery the anomaly consisted of ten pixels ranging in temperature from 30 to 49 °C with two pixels near saturation. The anomaly may have represented a pyroclastic flow that originated from the dome area. Seismic activity remained above background levels. On 24 May the Concern Color Code was reduced from Red to Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 May-22 May 2001

Due to the occurrence of several large explosions at Shiveluch, KVERT increased the Concern Color Code to Red on 21 May. An approximately 40-minute-long eruption began at 1556 on 19 May. An ash cloud rose to an altitude of 10 km a.s.l. and drifted to the NE. Short pyroclastic flows and hot avalanches from the lava dome were restricted to areas near the lava dome. At 1802 and 1814 on 20 May a large thermal anomaly was visible on satellite imagery. At 1925 and 2014 two explosions sent ash columns to heights ranging between 4.7 and 5 km a.s.l. At 0713 on 21 May an explosion sent an ash column to 10-12 km a.s.l. AVO reported that ash was visible on satellite imagery. At 0209 on 22 May an eruption produced a mushroom-shaped ash column to a height of ~20 km a.s.l. that drifted to the SSE. Reflected incandescence was observed above the volcano from the town of Klyuchi, 46 km from the volcano. The Concern Color Code changed several times during the week; on 19 May it was raised from Yellow to Red, on 20 May it was reduced to Yellow, and the following day it was raised again to Red.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


9 May-15 May 2001

After a pyroclastic-flow producing eruption occurred at ~0958 on 7 May, seismic activity decreased but it remained above background levels for most of the week, a new extrusive dome formed, and the Concern Color Code was reduced. A noticeable increase in seismic activity occurred between 1820 and 1852 on 7 May, and may have corresponded to an explosion that produced an ash-and-gas plume. The plume was visible in satellite imagery rising up to 4 km a.s.l. and drifting ~40 km to the WNW. A small amount of ash fell in the town of Kliuchi, 46 km from the volcano. During 11-15 May seismic activity continued to decrease, but remained above background levels. Many small earthquakes occurred at the volcano's edifice. At 0900 on 12 May a new extrusive lava dome was observed from Kliuchi that was steaming intensely, 100 m high, 200 m wide at the upper part of the dome, and had a volume of ~10 million m3. Observers in Kliuchi reported that by 2140 on 13 May the dome had grown ~50 m higher. Weak explosions produced ash-and-steam plumes that rose up to 1 km above the new dome. On 16 May the Concern Color Code at Shiveluch was reduced from Orange to Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 May-8 May 2001

Volcanic activity continued at high levels at Shiveluch, with an increase in seismic activity, a thermal anomaly visible in satellite imagery, several small explosions, and a small pyroclastic-flow-producing eruption. An increase in seismic activity occurred on 1 May following the initial increase on 22 April and subsequent slight decrease on 28 April. The seismic activity increase on 1 May consisted of many shallow earthquakes and episodes of weak spasmodic tremor. Several small eruptions produced gas-and-steam plumes that rose up to 1.5 km. AVO reported that on 2 May a weak thermal anomaly (3 pixels) that was originally detected on 30 April was visible on satellite imagery. By 3 May the thermal anomaly had increased in intensity, with 2 of the 3-4 pixels at or near saturation on the imagery. At 0958 on 7 May an eruption produced an ash-and-gas plume that rose ~4.5 km a.s.l. and extended to the NW. Small pyroclastic flows were visible traveling down the volcano's SW slope. The Concern Color Code at Shiveluch remained at Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 April-1 May 2001

Following the sharp increase in seismic activity on 22 April the number and magnitude of seismic events continued to increase at Shiveluch until 27 April. The largest earthquake occurred on 27 April (M 4) and the number and magnitude of earthquakes began to slightly decrease on 28 April. Several gas-and-steam plumes that reached a maximum height of 700 m above the volcano were observed starting on 28 April. As of 1 May seismic activity was still significantly above background levels. KVERT stated that the trend of the seismic activity is similar to the increase that preceded the violent 1993 eruption. The Concern Color Code at Shiveluch remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 April-24 April 2001

During 13-20 April seismic activity was above background levels at Shiveluch before increasing sharply on 22 April. Heavy clouds prevented visual observations of the volcano, but seismic data suggested that no ash explosions occurred. Due to the high seismic activity KVERT raised the Concern Color Code from Yellow to Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 April-17 April 2001

Seismicity was at background levels during 6-13 April. Short series of separate, shallow earthquakes and episodes of volcanic tremor were registered during the week. Some of the seismic events may have corresponded to weak ash-and-gas and steam-and-gas explosions. During 6-8 April a gas-and-steam plume rose 500-800 m above the volcano and extended 5-10 km to the E. At 1500 on 7 April a gas-and-steam plume rose up to 1.2 km above the volcano. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 April-10 April 2001

The KVERT reported that at 1638 on 5 April a short-lived explosive eruption, with an accompanying increase in seismic activity, produced an ash-poor plume that rose 4.5-5 km above Shiveluch's dome. At 1725 the plume extended more that 50 km to the SSE. According to the Tokyo VAAC the plume was visible on GMS imagery until ~1430 on 6 April. In addition, during the week small gas-and-steam plumes rose 50-400 m above the volcano and four, 2- to 3-minute-long shallow earthquakes were registered on 2, 4, and 5 April. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


28 March-3 April 2001

The KVERT reported that at 0555 on 24 March a 2-minute-long shallow earthquake was followed by weak spasmodic volcanic tremor that lasted ~10 minutes. This burst of activity may have corresponded to weak ash-and-gas explosions that reached a height of ~2 km above the crater. On 27 March a powerful gas-and-steam plume rose 800 m above the volcano. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 March-27 March 2001

The KVERT reported that seismicity was mainly at background levels. On 18 March a 12-minute-long series of shallow earthquakes registered. On 22 March a 2-minute-long shallow earthquake swarm was followed by 20 minutes of weak spasmodic volcanic tremor. Another 2-minute earthquake swarm occurred shortly thereafter. These seismic bursts are thought to correspond to weak ash-gas explosions to heights of 2,000-3,000 m above the crater. On 18-19 and 22 March gas-and-steam plumes rose 200 m above the volcano. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 March-20 March 2001

The KVERT reported that seismicity was at background levels. On 9 and 11-14 March gas-and-steam plumes rose 400-1,000 m above the volcano. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 March-13 March 2001

The KVERT reported that during 2-6 March, several series of shallow earthquakes were registered, with some followed by weak spasmodic volcanic tremor. The bursts of activity may have corresponded to weak ash-and-gas explosions that rose to heights of 2-3 km above the crater. During 3-4 March, visual and satellite-based data revealed that a gas-and-ash plume rose 300-800 m above the crater and drifted more than 50 km to the E. At 1545 on 7 March seismic data indicated the probable occurrence of a short-lived gas-and-ash explosion, accompanied by a series of shallow and high-frequency earthquakes for ~15 minutes. Observers in Klyuchi town reported that at 1600 the same day the ash-and-gas plume rose 1.5 km above the lava dome and extended to the NW. According to a pilot report, at 1620 the ash plume was visible at a height of 10 km above the volcano drifting towards the NE. The AVO reported that satellite imagery at 1715 showed two plumes: one was at a low altitude, composed mostly of steam, and drifted to the E; the other was located 7-8 km a.s.l., composed mostly of ash, and drifted to the N. At 1625 the Tokyo VAAC detected the ash cloud on GMS-5 imagery at a height of ~10 km a.s.l. The ash cloud was no longer visible on satellite imagery by 0342 on 8 March. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 February-6 March 2001

The KVERT reported that during 25-27 February there was an increase in seismic activity. Two- and three-minute-long series of shallow earthquakes were registered and followed by weak volcanic tremor. These outbursts may have corresponded to weak ash-and-gas explosions that reached a height of ~2 km above the crater. On 23, 24, and 28 February gas-and-steam plumes rose 250-600 m above the volcano. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 February-27 February 2001

The KVERT reported that during 19-20 February there was an increase in seismic activity. Two- and four-minute-long series of shallow earthquakes were registered, possibly corresponding to weak ash-and-gas explosions. On 22 February, a gas-and-steam plume rose 900 m above the volcano. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 February-20 February 2001

The KVERT reported that during 9-16 February seismicity was at background levels. On 9-10 February a gas-and-steam plume rose 1-1.2 km above the volcano. On 12-15 February a gas-and-steam plume rose 300-500 m above the volcano. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 February-13 February 2001

The KVERT reported that during most of the week seismicity was at background levels. At 1100 on 2 February a powerful gas-and-ash eruption produced a plume that rose 800 m above the volcano and spread ~3 km towards the W. The same day, observations from Klyuchi town revealed that at 1804 a short-lived eruption produced an ash plume that rose up to ~5.3 km a.s.l. The event was accompanied by a 2-minute-long shallow seismic signal that was detected more than 110 km from the volcano. Afterwards, during 1807 to 1824 strong volcanic tremor was registered. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


31 January-6 February 2001

The KVERT reported that at 1802 and 1820 on 29 January, shallow earthquakes were registered beneath the volcano that were accompanied by short-lived explosions. The ash cloud produced from the first explosion reached ~2.5 km above the volcano, while the second eruption's ash cloud could not be observed. During 26-31 January a gas-and-steam plume rose 50-800 m above the volcano, and on 1 February a gas-and-steam plume rose 2 km above the volcano. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 January-30 January 2001

KVERT reported that on 21-24 January seismicity was above background levels and on 20-24 January a gas-and-steam plume rose 50-1,000 m above the volcano. Shallow earthquakes were registered under the volcano along with short-lived explosions at 0444 on 22 January and at 0924 on 24 January. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 January-23 January 2001

On 13 and 18 January seismicity and volcanism rose above background levels. At 0202 on 13 January a shallow earthquake was accompanied by a short-lived explosion, and at 1106 on 18 January similar activity sent an ash cloud to 4.5 km a.s.l. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 January-9 January 2001

Volcanic activity was above average on 31 December, and on 2, 4, and 5 January: shallow earthquakes were accompanied by short-lived explosions that sent ash plumes to a maximum height of ~2 km above the volcano. On 2 and 4 January a gas-and-steam plume rose 300 m above the crater. The Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 December-2 January 2001

KVERT reported that seismicity remained at background levels throughout most of the week. Beginning at 0743 on 29 December shallow earthquakes under the volcano were accompanied by short-lived explosions that sent a plume to a height of 2-3 km above the volcano. On 23, 24, and 25 December gas-and-steam plumes were observed rising 300-1,000 m above the crater. KVERT raised the Concern Color Code from Green to Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 December-26 December 2000

KVERT reported that much like the previous week, the character of the volcanic activity did not change during 15-22 December. On 15 and 20 December weak seismicity was registered at the volcano and at 2105 on 15 December a seismic event was likely accompanied by a gas-and-ash explosion that sent a cloud to an inferred height of 2 km a.s.l. On 20 December a gas-and-steam plume rose 200-300 m above the crater. KVERT lowered the Concern Color Code from Yellow to Green.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 December-19 December 2000

KVERT reported that the character of volcanic activity at Shiveluch did not change during 9-16 December. Weak seismicity was registered at the volcano during most of the week. Much like the previous week, two seismic events occurred that were above normal levels. First, at 2147 on 9 December a shallow seismic event was likely accompanied by a gas-and-ash explosion that sent a cloud to an inferred 3.5 km a.s.l. The event was followed by volcanic tremor for ~0.5 hour. The second possible gas-and-ash explosion occurred at 0021 on 12 December. The cloud was again inferred from seismic data to have risen to ~4 km a.s.l. These inferred plume heights were determined by comparing the amplitude of the seismic wave caused by the eruption to the heights of ash clouds observed in the past associated with earthquakes with similar amplitudes. After the 12 December event, volcanic tremor was registered for 1 hour. The Concern Color Code at the volcano remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 December-12 December 2000

For most of the period during 1-8 December weak seismicity was registered at the volcano, however two seismic events occurred that were above normal levels. First, at 1853 on 6 December seismic data indicated that a gas-and-ash explosion may have occurred. The possible explosion was registered as a shallow seismic event and was followed by volcanic tremor. Then, at 1556 on 7 December another shallow seismic event and possible gas-and-ash explosion occurred. The height of the cloud was estimated on the basis of seismicity at about 4-4.5 km a.s.l. The Concern Color Code at the volcano remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 November-5 December 2000

On 24 November a gas-and-steam plume rose 400 m above the volcano and extended 5 km to the E. No seismicity was registered at Shiveluch during most of the period during 24 November to 1 December, but at 0935 on 27 November a strong, shallow seismic event occurred. KVERT raised the Concern Color Code from Green to Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1999 Aug 15 2014 Feb 27 (continuing) Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
1999 Apr 3 1999 Apr 12 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1998 May 30 1998 Sep 3 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1997 Mar 8 1997 Apr 4 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1990 Jan 10 1995 Feb Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1989 Apr 7 1989 Jun 26 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1988 Dec 7 1988 Dec 7 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1986 Mar 28 1988 Feb 28 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1985 May 26 1985 Oct 25 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1984 Mar 17 1984 Sep 6 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1980 Aug 23 1981 Dec 1 ± 30 days Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Center of 1964 crater
1964 Nov 12 1964 Nov 12 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations Molodoy Sheveluch summit domes
1944 Nov 5 1950 Apr 6 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Suelich
1930 Feb 1 ± 30 days Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1928 Jan 27 1929 Apr 15 ± 45 days Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1905 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
1897 1898 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1879 1883 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1854 Feb 18 Unknown Confirmed 5 Historical Observations
[ 1800 ± 10 years ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 3  
1739 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1700 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
1650 ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected) Tephra layer SH1
1550 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
1430 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected) Tephra layer SH2a
1150 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
1030 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected) Tephra layer SH2
1000 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
0970 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected)
0750 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
0700 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
0650 ± 40 years Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected) Tephra layer SH3
0630 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology Western flank (Karan)
0600 (?) Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected)
0580 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
0530 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
0500 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected)
0380 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected)
0250 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
0230 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
0170 ± 20 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected)
0120 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected)
0100 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
0010 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
[ 0050 BCE (?) ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
0150 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology West flank (Karan)
0300 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected) West flank (Karan)
0400 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology West flank (Karan)
0500 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected)
0650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
0780 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected) Tephra layer SH5
0900 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
0950 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected)
1010 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
1330 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected)
1500 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
1650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
1700 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
2000 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected) Tephra layer SHsp
2100 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected)
2150 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
2200 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
2490 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected)
2530 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
2620 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected) Tephra layer SHdv
2750 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
2900 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
3050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
3200 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
3500 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected)
3650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected)
4250 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
4350 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected)
4400 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected)
4530 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected)
4900 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
[ 5050 BCE (?) ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
5400 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
5500 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 5 Tephrochronology
6000 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
6100 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
6200 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
6350 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
6380 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
6400 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected)
6500 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
6600 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
6800 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 5 Tephrochronology
7000 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
7150 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 5 Tephrochronology
7300 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 5 Tephrochronology
7400 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (corrected)
7500 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
7550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
7600 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
7630 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
7700 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
7750 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
7850 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
7950 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
8100 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
8200 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
8350 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology
8450 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology
8500 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Belousov A B, 1995. The Shiveluch volcanic eruption of 12 November 1964--explosive eruption provoked by failure of the edifice. J Volc Geotherm Res, 66: 357-365.

Belousov A B, Belousova M G, 1995. The 1964 eruption of Shiveluch (Kamchatka) - a plinian eruption preceded by a voluminous slide of the cone top. Volc Seism, 17: 497-508 (English translation).

Belousov A, Belousova M, Voight B, 1999. Multiple edifice failures, debris avalanches and associated eruptions in the Holocene history of Shiveluch volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Bull Volc, 61: 324-342.

Braitseva O A, Melekestsev I V, Ponomareva V V, Sulerzhitsky L D, 1995. Ages of calderas, large explosive craters and active volcanoes in the Kuril-Kamchatka region, Russia. Bull Volc, 57: 383-402.

Dirksen O, Humphreys M C S, Pletchov P, Melnik O, Demyanchuk Y, Spartks R S J, Mahony S, 2006. The 2001-2004 dome-forming eruption of Shiveluch volcano, Kamchatka: observation, petrological investigation and numerical modelling. J Volc Geotherm Res, 155: 201-226.

Fedotov S A, Masurenkov Y P (eds), 1991. Active Volcanoes of Kamchatka. Moscow: Nauka Pub, 2 volumes.

Gorelchik V I, Shirokov V A, Firstov P P, Chubarova O S, 1997. Shiveluch volcano: seismicity, deep structure and forecasting eruptions (Kamchatka). J Volc Geotherm Res, 78: 121-132.

Gorshkov G S, Dubik Y M, 1970. Gigantic directed blast at Shiveluch volcano (Kamchatka). Bull Volc, 34: 261-288.

Green J, Short N M, 1971. Volcanic Landforms and Surface Features: a Photographic Atlas and Glossary. New York: Springer-Verlag, 519 p.

Hantke G, 1959. Ubersicht uber die Vulkanische Tatigkeit 1954-1956. Bull Volc, 20: 3-36.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Kozhemyaka N N, 1996. Long-lived volcanic centers of Kamchatka: types of cones, growth time spans, volumes of erupted material, productivities, rock proportions, and tectonic settings. Volc Seism, 17: 621-636 (English translation).

Ponomareva V V, Melekestsev I V, Dirksen O V, 2006. Sector collapses and large landslides on late Pleistocene-Holocene volcanoes in Kamchatka, Russia. J Volc Geotherm Res, 158: 117-138.

Ponomareva V V, Pevzner M M, Melekestsev I V, 1998. Large debris avalanches and associated eruptions in the Holocene eruptive history of Shiveluch volcano, Kamchatka. Bull Volc, 59: 490-505.

Vlodavetz V I, Piip B I, 1959. Kamchatka and Continental Areas of Asia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 8: 1-110.

Zharinov N A, Bogoyavlenskaya G E, Khubunaya S A, Demyanchuk Y V, 1995. Shiveluch volcano: a new eruptive cycle of 1980-1993. Volc Seism, 17: 21-30 (English translation).

The high, isolated massif of Shiveluch volcano (also spelled Sheveluch) rises above the lowlands NNE of the Kliuchevskaya volcano group. The 1300 cu km Shiveluch is one of Kamchatka's largest and most active volcanic structures. The summit of roughly 65,000-year-old Stary Shiveluch is truncated by a broad 9-km-wide late-Pleistocene caldera breached to the south. Many lava domes dot its outer flanks. The Molodoy Shiveluch lava dome complex was constructed during the Holocene within the large horseshoe-shaped caldera; Holocene lava dome extrusion also took place on the flanks of Stary Shiveluch. At least 60 large eruptions of Shiveluch have occurred during the Holocene, making it the most vigorous andesitic volcano of the Kuril-Kamchatka arc. Widespread tephra layers from these eruptions have provided valuable time markers for dating volcanic events in Kamchatka. Frequent collapses of dome complexes, most recently in 1964, have produced debris avalanches whose deposits cover much of the floor of the breached caldera.