Zhupanovsky

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 53.59°N
  • 159.147°E

  • 2958 m
    9702 ft

  • 300120
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

23 October-29 October 2013

KVERT reported that a weak thermal anomaly over Zhupanovsky was detected on 23 October. The next day a phreatic eruption began at about 0300 and generated an ash plume that rose 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. The ash plume was visible in satellite images drifting 40 km SE and S. Ash deposits about 10 cm thick were visible at the summit of the central part of the volcano, and deposits about 1 mm thick covered the Nalychevo Valley. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Orange. Ash plumes at 1635 and 2218 rose to altitudes of 2.5-3 km (8,200-10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 120 km ESE and 25 km S, respectively. At 1134 on 25 October an ash plume rose 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 20 km NE. On 27 October KVERT noted that strong fumarolic activity and gas emissions continued, but that the phreatic explosions likely had ceased. The Aviation Color Code was lowered to Yellow, and then lowered again to Green on 29 October.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)



 Available Weekly Reports


2013: October


23 October-29 October 2013

KVERT reported that a weak thermal anomaly over Zhupanovsky was detected on 23 October. The next day a phreatic eruption began at about 0300 and generated an ash plume that rose 5 km (16,400 ft) a.s.l. The ash plume was visible in satellite images drifting 40 km SE and S. Ash deposits about 10 cm thick were visible at the summit of the central part of the volcano, and deposits about 1 mm thick covered the Nalychevo Valley. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Orange. Ash plumes at 1635 and 2218 rose to altitudes of 2.5-3 km (8,200-10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 120 km ESE and 25 km S, respectively. At 1134 on 25 October an ash plume rose 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 20 km NE. On 27 October KVERT noted that strong fumarolic activity and gas emissions continued, but that the phreatic explosions likely had ceased. The Aviation Color Code was lowered to Yellow, and then lowered again to Green on 29 October.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1959 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1956 Dec 27 1957 Jun Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Middle crater, east crater
1940 Jan 1940 Feb Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1929 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1925 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1882 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1776 Oct Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1000 ± 500 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology
0050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology
0220 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
3050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology
5050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Fedotov S A, Masurenkov Y P (eds), 1991. Active Volcanoes of Kamchatka. Moscow: Nauka Pub, 2 volumes.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Kozhemyaka N N, 1995. Active volcanoes of Kamchatka: types and growth time of cones, total volumes of erupted material, productivity, and composition of rocks. Volc Seism, 16: 581-594 (English translation).

Luchitsky I V (ed), 1974. History of the Development of Relief of Siberia and the Far East. Kamchatka, Kurile and Komander Islands. Moscow: Nauka Pub, 439 p (in Russian).

Vlasov G M, 1967. Kamchatka, Kuril, and Komandorskiye Islands: geological description. In: {Geol of the USSR}, Moscow, 31: 1-827.

Vlodavetz V I, Piip B I, 1959. Kamchatka and Continental Areas of Asia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 8: 1-110.

The Zhupanovsky volcanic massif consists of four overlapping stratovolcanoes along a WNW-trending ridge. The elongated volcanic complex was constructed within a Pliocene-early Pleistocene caldera whose rim is exposed only on the eastern side. Three of the stratovolcanoes were built during the Pleistocene, the fourth is Holocene in age and was the source of all of Zhupanovsky's historical eruptions. An early Holocene stage of frequent moderate and weak eruptions from 7000 to 5000 years before present (BP) was succeeded by a period of infrequent larger eruptions that produced pyroclastic flows. The last major eruption of Zhupanovsky took place about 800-900 years BP. Historical eruptions have consisted of relatively minor explosions from the third cone.