Alaid

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 50.858°N
  • 155.55°E

  • 2339 m
    7672 ft

  • 290390
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

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2 January-8 January 2013

According to KVERT, observers on both Paramushir (SE) and Shumshu islands reported weak gas-and-steam plumes containing small amounts of ash from Alaid during 5, 11, 16-17, 23, and 27-28 October 2012. Photos taken on 27 October showed ash deposits on the cone and a small cinder cone growing in the crater. The cone was again covered by ash on 8 November. Seismicity increased on 16 November and remained elevated until 6 December, when it decreased until 10 December. Technical problems prevented seismic recordings after that. Satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly on the volcano until 12 December. On 8 January 2013 the Aviation Color Code was lowered to Green.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)

Index of Weekly Reports


2013: January
2012: October
2010: May
2003: October | November | December

Weekly Reports


2 January-8 January 2013

According to KVERT, observers on both Paramushir (SE) and Shumshu islands reported weak gas-and-steam plumes containing small amounts of ash from Alaid during 5, 11, 16-17, 23, and 27-28 October 2012. Photos taken on 27 October showed ash deposits on the cone and a small cinder cone growing in the crater. The cone was again covered by ash on 8 November. Seismicity increased on 16 November and remained elevated until 6 December, when it decreased until 10 December. Technical problems prevented seismic recordings after that. Satellite imagery showed a weak thermal anomaly on the volcano until 12 December. On 8 January 2013 the Aviation Color Code was lowered to Green.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 October-23 October 2012

According to KVERT, observers on Paramushir Island (SE) reported weak gas-and-steam activity from Alaid during 11 and 16-17 October. A thermal anomaly on the volcano was detected in satellite imagery during 12 and 14-17 October. Cloud cover prevented observations during 19-22 October. Observers on Shumshu Island (50 km E) reported that an ash plume rose 700 m above the crater on 23 October and a thermal anomaly was detected in satellite imagery. The Aviation Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 October-16 October 2012

According to KVERT, observers on Paramushir Island reported that on 5 October a large gas-and-steam plume from Alaid rose 200 m above the crater. A thermal anomaly on the volcano was detected in satellite imagery for 7.5 hours the next day. The increased activity prompted KVERT to raise the Aviation Color Code to Yellow on 7 October. Satellite imagery detected a thermal anomaly on 15 October.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 May-1 June 2010

KVERT reported that on 23 May a gas-and-steam plume from Alaid was seen in satellite imagery drifting 11 km ESE. No other signs of possible increasing activity were seen in imagery or noted by observers on Paramushir Island during 21-28 May. KVERT lowered the Aviation Color Code to Green.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 December-23 December 2003

During 12-19 December, KVERT reduced the Concern Color Code at Alaid from Yellow to Green. Seismicity had been slightly above background levels since 31 October, but KVERT seismologists concluded that it was not related to volcanic activity.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 November-18 November 2003

During 7-14 November, seismicity was above background levels at Alaid. Spasmodic volcanic tremor occurred and a large number of weak local earthquakes were recorded. Clouds obscured satellite images of the volcano. Alaid remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 October-4 November 2003

KVERT raised the Concern Color Code at Alaid from Green to Yellow on 4 November.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


Index of Monthly Reports

Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

06/1972 (CSLP 38-72) Long fissure eruption sends ash plume more than 8 km high

07/1972 (CSLP 38-72) New vent on NW flank

12/1972 (CSLP 38-72) Explosive activity ceased on 15 August

04/1981 (SEAN 06:04) Strong explosive eruption; ashfalls to more than 1,000 km

05/1981 (SEAN 06:05) April-May eruption detailed

03/1982 (SEAN 07:03) Plume on satellite imagery

10/1986 (Ref 1988) Collapse of the 1981 cone in the summit crater

04/1987 (SEAN 12:04) Fumarolic activity in crater

12/1996 (BGVN 21:12) Eruption sends a plume 5-6 km high on 3 December

09/1997 (BGVN 22:09) Hot spot seen on satellite imagery; ashfall on Kamchatka

10/2003 (BGVN 28:10) Volcanic tremor detected beginning on 31 October

11/2003 (BGVN 28:11) Weak seismicity, but tremor determined to be wind-related

10/2013 (BGVN 38:10) Minor ash plumes on 17 and 23 October and 8 November 2012


Contents of Monthly Reports

All information contained in these reports is preliminary and subject to change.

All times are local (= UTC + 11 hours)

06/1972 (CSLP 38-72) Long fissure eruption sends ash plume more than 8 km high

Card 1405 (22 June 1972) Powerful eruption sends plume to over 8 km altitude

The Insitute of Volcanology at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy reports a powerful underwater eruption of the volcano Alaid, situated on the Kuril Island of that name. A report has come from southern Kamchatka on the fall of volcanic ash. Traces of the eruption were observed from an aircraft on snowcaps on Paramushir Island. Experts of the Volcanology Institute were unable to approach Alaid because of the black dust clouds. Flying from the southwest, the volcanologists witnessed the eruption of the volcano. According to the scientists' reports, a rain of volcanic particles fell on the coast and on the water, while the cloud reached an altitude of over 8 km and was 5-6 km wide.

Card 1406 (26 June 1972) Eruptive fissure extends into the sea

The following cable was received on 26 June. "June 19 submarine eruption volcano Alaid began. Fissure going into sea for some kilometers has formed at northwest foot volcano Alaid June 20. Eruptive cloud reached 8 km height, 5-6 km width black steam gaseous mixture had greatest thickness 2-4 km from island shoreline. Outbursts periodicity from shore funnels approximately 1.5 minute."

Information Contacts:
Card 1405 (22 June 1972) Y.M. Doubik, IV.
Card 1406 (26 June 1972) Dr. Khrenof, IV.

07/1972 (CSLP 38-72) New vent on NW flank

Card 1410 (10 July 1972) New vent on NW flank

The following was received on 10 July. "July 3 new adventive cone on northwest flank reached height 120 m, width 350 m. Only steam emission from upper explosive crater. From lower crater every two seconds lava bombs outburst to height of 500 m. Flow is typical blocky basalt, thickness 15 m, average width 500 m, length 1.3 km; entered sea and formed peninsula 06 to 06 km."

Information Contact: Y.M. Doubik, IV.

12/1972 (CSLP 38-72) Explosive activity ceased on 15 August

Card 1518 (27 December 1972) Explosive activity ceased on 15 August

The following was received on 27 December. "Explosive activity ceased on 15 August. Lava effusion ceased on 11 September. Total tephra and lava volume reached 1 km3. New lateral craters display only fumarolic activity now."

Information Contact: Y.M. Doubik, IV.

04/1981 (SEAN 06:04) Strong explosive eruption; ashfalls to more than 1,000 km

Soviet volcanologists reported that an explosive summit eruption from Alaid, on uninhabited Atlasova Island, began after midday on 27 April and intensified the next day. Much of the information on the eruption from both U.S. and Soviet sources is from analysis of satellite imagery. Clouds prevented satellite observations until about 0715 on the 28th, when infrared imagery from the NOAA 6 polar orbiter revealed a distinct V-shaped eruption plume that extended a short distance NE from the volcano before disappearing in heavy weather clouds. An infrared image returned from the GMS at 1100 showed a similar pattern. Microbarographs at Kushiro Weather Observatory (about 1,250 km SW of Alaid) recorded three distinct pressure waves on 28 April: at 1143 (0.5 millibars), 1153 (0.2 millibars), and 1340 (0.8 millibars).

Vigorous feeding of this cloud could be seen on the satellite imagery for the next 2 days (figure 1). 29 April imagery indicated that the plume consisted of two primary layers, at about 9-11 km and 13.5-15 km altitude. The last clear-weather image, on 30 April at 1700, showed a plume at least 120 km wide and 1,900 km long. Eighteen hours later (1100 on 1 May, 4 days after the eruption began) partial clearing showed that feeding of the plume had apparently ended. Weather obscured the area on images from 30 April at 2300 to 1 May at 1100, when partial clearing showed that feeding of the plume had apparently ended.

Figure 1. NOAA 6 satellite image, returned 30 April at 0910, showing eruption plumes from Alaid. The image was obtained using the 11 µm thermal infrared sensor. Image resolution is 4 km. Two plumes are evident, one bright and distinct. the other diffuse, but well-defined. The plumes are over 1,700 km in length, trailing off the right side of the image. Analysis of the imagery shows that the brighter plume has a temperature of about -55°C, and the diffuse plume an apparent temperature of -10°C. Comparison of the temperature of the colder (and therefore higher) of the two plumes with radiosonde temperature profiles collected from Petropavlovsk. Kamchatka (300 km NE of the volcano) and Podgornoye, Paramushir Island (50 km S of the volcano) yielded two possible altitudes for this plume; 9.8-10.4 km if it had not passed through the tropopause (at 11.6 km), or 13.7-14.3 km if the plume was stratospheric. The image and caption information were provided by Michael Matson.

Significant ashfalls were reported over a wide area. Soviet volcanologists reported that the ash, a pyroxene olivine basalt, fell as much as 1,000 km from the volcano, over an area of 150,000 km2. They noted an accumulation of 30 cm of ash 7 km from Alaid, and Tass reported that 20-25 cm fell on the town of Severokurilsk (45 km ESE of the volcano), where residents heard roaring noises and saw a glow from the volcano during the night. Schools were closed in Severokurilsk and radio communication was disrupted. Ash mixed with wet snow fell on Petropavlovsk (300 km NE of the volcano) and other inhabited areas on the Kamchatka Peninsula. In the Aleutians, ashfall began 28 April on Shemya (about 1,200 km ENE of Alaid), and lasted all day 30 April and 1 May, when roughly 2 mm of ash were measured in very windy weather. Lt. Becker observed intermittent ashfalls and periods of acid rain between 2 and 5 May, always within 1.5 hours after low ocean tide. Ash collected at Shemya was sent to the NASA Ames Research Center. Daily precipitation sampling from Adak Island (650 km E of Shemya and 1900 km from Alaid) 1-7 May yielded only a trace of ash, on the 4th.

Tass reported that volcanologists overflew the volcano 29 April and observed an ash column that rose to about 10 km altitude from the summit crater. Soviet volcanologists later reported a maximum eruption cloud height during the activity of 12 km, based on overflights and analysis of satellite imagery.

Soviet volcanologists reported that activity declined 2-4 May. No additional activity was observed on satellite imagery until 8 May at 2300, when the GMS satellite recorded a new eruption column starting to emerge from Alaid. Careful examination of earlier imagery from other satellites indicates that the renewed activity may have started as early as 1930. By 9 May at 0300, a dense plume extended more than 120 km to the ESE. This plume remained shorter and much narrower than the late April clouds, reaching a maximum length of about 400 km ESE from the volcano. GMS imagery continued to show strong feeding of the cloud at 1100, but the eruption seemed to be weakening by 1400 and had apparently ended by the time of the next available image at 2000.

Attempts to observe and sample the ejecta farther downwind continue. During the night of 6-7 May, lidar operated by SRI International near San Francisco, California detected two distinct layers of material at 11.9 and 12.8 km altitude, just below the tropopause. However, it was not possible to confirm that this material was of volcanic origin.

A preliminary search for strong seismicity associated with the eruption yielded only a single shallow magnitude 6.0 event at 44.04°N, 149.93°E (860 km SSW of the volcano), on 1 May at 0142.

Information Contacts: S. Fedotov and B. Ivanov, IVP; F. Smigielski, S. Arnett, and M. Matson, NOAA/NESS; G. Telegadas, NOAA/ARL; D. Shimozuru, Univ. of Tokyo; R. Muñoz, NASA, Ames Research Center; M. McCormick, NASA, Langley Research Center; P. Russell, SRI International; Lt. Becker, USAF, Shemya AK; Tass; USGS/NEIS.

05/1981 (SEAN 06:05) April-May eruption detailed

G.S. Steinberg provided the following additional information on the early stages of the eruption. Activity began 27 April with the emission of a small white plume. The magnitude of the explosions increased rapidly, soon building a black ash column more than 10 km high. Ashfall was intense at Severokurilsk (45 km ESE of the volcano), and by the end of 27 April as much as 20 cm had been deposited there. Schools and kindergartens were closed the next day and water collecting facilities were disrupted by the ash. The wind changed direction 29 April, blowing the eruption cloud NE. At Petropavlovsk, 300 km to the NE, an estimated 1.5 kg/m2 of ash had accumulated by the end of 29 April. The eruption reached its maximum intensity 30 April-1 May. Activity began to decrease 2 May, was limited to ejection of ash and larger tephra to less than 100 m height by 4-5 May, and stopped 7 May.

Michael Matson provided the following satellite data. Plumes of varying langths were intermittently present through late May on imagery (at about 0730 each day) from the NOAA 6 polar orbiting satellite. The minor activity reported by Steinberg after 2 May could not be seen on the images, but a small plume from Alaid appeared 7 May. On 8 May, a plume extended about 350 km from Alaid, but 24 hours later it was only about 60 km long. There was a plume on the 10 May imagery, but no activity was evident 11-14 May. A very small plume reappeared 15 May, had grown to 250 km long by the 17th, and persisted, at lengths that varied from 50 to nearly 600 km, through 27 May (weather clouds obscured the volcano 19 and 25 May). Alaid appeared to emit a plume no more than 25 km long on 1 June. No additional activity was evident on the satellite imagery through 9 June.

Further References. Fedotov, S.A., Ivanov, B.V., Avdeyko, G.P., Flerov, G, and others, 1981, The 1981 eruption of Alaid volcano: Volcanology and Seismology, 1981, no. 5, p. 82-87.

Sawada, Y., 1983, Analysis of eruption clouds by the 1981 eruptions of Alaid and Pagan volcanoes with GMS images: Papers in Meteorology and Geophysics, v. 34, p. 307-324.

Information Contacts: G. Steinberg, Sakhalin Complex Institute; M. Matson, NOAA/NESS.

03/1982 (SEAN 07:03) Plume on satellite imagery

Imagery from the GMS satellite revealed a narrow, linear eruption plume emerging from Alaid at 1100 on 29 March. The plume extended roughly 100 km to the ESE and was estimated to be roughly 2 hours old. Images returned 3 hours earlier and later showed no evidence of activity.

Information Contact: M. Matson, NOAA/NESS.

10/1986 (Ref 1988) Collapse of the 1981 cone in the summit crater

Dvigalo and others (1988) report that the major 1981 eruption was not followed by observed changes in crater morphology until 1986. During aerial observations on 25 May 1986, voluminous gas clouds covered the entire crater area, and were occasionally gray from ash. Overflights on 31 May and 9 June revealed that the summit crater's 1981 cone (250 m high and 600 m across at its base) had been almost entirely destroyed. Its former site was occupied by two collapse craters, the larger of which was ~300 m across and 100 m deep. No additional changes were evident during 15 October observations.

Reference. Dvigalo, V.N., Andreev, V.I., Gavrilenko, G.M., Ovsyannikov, A.A., Razina, A.A., and Chirkov, A.M., 1988, Activity of southeast Kamchatka and north Kuriles volcanoes in 1985-1986: Volcanology and Seismology, no. 3, p. 13-20 (in Russian); v. 10, no. 3, p. 347-359 (English translation, 1990).

04/1987 (SEAN 12:04) Fumarolic activity in crater

In November 1986, the main fumarolic activity was concentrated in one large vent in the crater. The vent's outer slopes were hot and snow-free while most of the crater area was covered in snow that had fallen September-October. No consistent snow patches had been seen in the crater during autumn 1982 overflights.

A scoria cone had formed within the summit crater during the large 1981 eruption (Fedotov and others, 1981, 1982). During aerial observations in September 1982, fumarolic activity was concentrated at three new vents at the site of this cone. Geologists believed that these vents formed during a brief eruption on 2 March 1982, detected by the GMS satellite. The changed vent distribution was thought to have been the result of an eruption between 1982 and 1986 that was not observed. The volcano is remote and its weather is often poor.

References. Fedotov, S.A., Ivanov, B.V., Avdeiko, G.P., Flerov, G.B., Andreyev, V.N., Dvigalo, V.N., Dubik, Y.M., Cherkov, A.M., 1981, 1981 eruption of the Alaid volcano: Volcanology and Seismology no. 5, p. 82-87.

Fedotov, S.A., Ivanov, B.V., Flerov, G.B., Avdeiko, G.P., Budnikov, V.A., Andreev, V.N., Gordeev, E.I., Dvigalo, V.N., Shirokov, V.A., 1982, Eruption of Alaid volcano (Kurile Islands) in 1981: Volcanology and Seismology, no. 6, p. 9-27.

Information Contacts: G. Steinberg and B. Piskunov, Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk.

12/1996 (BGVN 21:12) Eruption sends a plume 5-6 km high on 3 December

On 3 December, satellite imagery indicated a plume rising to a height of 5-6 km from Alaid. The nearest seismic station, located in the town of Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island), 25 km E of Alaid, recorded the beginning of local seismic activity at about the same time as the satellite report. A large snow storm obscured the volcano, and no visual reports of eruptive activity were received from the coast guard, ships, or aircraft in the area.

Information Contacts: Tom Miller, Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of a) U.S. Geological Survey, 4200 University Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508-4667, USA (URL: http://www.avo.alaska.edu/), b) Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, PO Box 757320, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320, USA, and c) Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, 794 University Ave., Suite 200, Fairbanks, AK 99709, USA; Vladimir Kirianov, Kamchatka Volcanic Eruptions Response Team (KVERT), Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry, Piip Ave. 9, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, 683006, Russia; NOAA/NESDIS Satellite Analysis Branch; Room 401, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746, USA.

09/1997 (BGVN 22:09) Hot spot seen on satellite imagery; ashfall on Kamchatka

On 23 August a possible hot spot at Alaid was reported to be visible on U.S. satellite imagery. The Russian Coast Guard informed the Kamchatka Volcanic Eruptions Response Team (KVERT) that ash had fallen on the SW part of the Kamchatka Peninsula. No ashfalls or other signs of eruptive activity were reported at Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island), 25 km E of the volcano, or from a fishing vessel 10 km from the volcano.

Information Contacts: Vladimir Kirianov, Kamchatka Volcanic Eruptions Response Team (KVERT), Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry, Piip Ave. 9, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, 683006, Russia; Tom Miller, Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of a) U.S. Geological Survey, 4200 University Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508-4667, USA (URL: http://www.avo.alaska.edu/), b) Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, PO Box 757320, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320, USA, and c) Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, 794 University Ave., Suite 200, Fairbanks, AK 99709, USA.

10/2003 (BGVN 28:10) Volcanic tremor detected beginning on 31 October

On 4 November 2003 the Level of Concern Color Code was raised to Yellow due to volcanic tremor that began on 31 October. Weak seismicity continued through 7 November. Volcanic tremor during this time was 0.5-3.3 x 10-6 mps, and a large number of weak local events were registered. On satellite images the volcano was obscured by clouds all week.

The Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team notes that Alaid is characterized by two types of eruptions: central crater eruptions and lateral eruptions. Central crater eruptions are stronger and more dangerous then the lateral ones. The strongest central crater eruptions of Alaid were in February 1793, June 1854, July 1860, 1894, and April 1981. The April 1981 eruption sent an ash plume to 8,000-9,000 m altitude that extended for more than 1,500 km (SEAN 06:04 and 06:05). Two eruptions in 1933-1934 and 1972 (CSLP Cards nos. 1405, 1406, 1410, and 1518) ejected ash columns 3 km high.

Satellite imagery indicated possible activity in March 1982 (SEAN 07:03 and 12:04), 3 December 1996 (BGVN 21:12), and 23 August 1997 (BGVN 22:09).

Information Contacts: Anastasia Tranbenkova, Kamchatka Volcanic Eruptions Response Team (KVERT), a cooperative program of the Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry, Far East Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Piip Ave. 9, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, 683006, Russia, the Kamchatka Experimental and Methodical Seismological Department (KEMSD), GS RAS (Russia), and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (USA); Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, 4200 University Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508-4667, USA (URL: http://www.avo.alaska.edu/), the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, PO Box 757320, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320, USA, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, 794 University Ave., Suite 200, Fairbanks, AK 99709, USA.

11/2003 (BGVN 28:11) Weak seismicity, but tremor determined to be wind-related

From 8 November through mid-December 2003 the hazard status of Alaid remained at Yellow. Weak seismic activity has remained slightly above background levels since 31 October. The volcano was also obscured by clouds during this period. Continuous spasmodic volcanic tremor was recorded (0.15-3.4 x 10-6 m/s), and a large number of weak local events were registered, during each week. The report for the week of 12-19 December indicated that seismologists have now decided that the tremor is probably not of volcanic origin, but has probably been a result of strong winds. The Level of Concern Color Code was lowered to Green on 19 December 2003.

Information Contacts: Olga Girina, Kamchatka Volcanic Eruptions Response Team (KVERT), a cooperative program of the Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry, Far East Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Piip Ave. 9, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, 683006, Russia, the Kamchatka Experimental and Methodical Seismological Department (KEMSD), GS RAS (Russia), and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (USA); Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, 4200 University Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508-4667, USA (URL: http://www.avo.alaska.edu/), the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, PO Box 757320, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320, USA, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, 794 University Ave., Suite 200, Fairbanks, AK 99709, USA.

10/2013 (BGVN 38:10) Minor ash plumes on 17 and 23 October and 8 November 2012

An HTML version of this report is not available, please read this report as a PDF file.

The highest and northernmost volcano of the Kuril Islands, 2339-m-high Alaid is a symmetrical stratovolcano when viewed from the north, but has a 1.5-km-wide summit crater that is breached widely to the south. Alaid is the northernmost of a chain of volcanoes constructed west of the main Kuril archipelago and rises 3000 m from the floor of the Sea of Okhotsk. Numerous pyroclastic cones dot the lower flanks of basaltic to basaltic-andesite Alaid volcano, particularly on the NW and SE sides, including an offshore cone formed during the 1933-34 eruption. Strong explosive eruptions have occurred from the summit crater beginning in the 18th century. Reports of eruptions in 1770, 1789, 1821, 1829, 1843, 1848, and 1858 were considered incorrect by Gorshkov (1970). Explosive eruptions at Alaid in 1790 and 1981 were among the largest in the Kuril Islands during historical time.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2012 Oct 5 2012 Dec 12 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit crater
[ 1997 Aug 23 ] [ 1997 Aug 23 ] Uncertain    
1996 Dec 3 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1986 May 25 1986 May 28 ± 3 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1982 Mar 29 1982 Mar 29 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1981 Nov 25 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1981 Apr 27 1981 Jun 5 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
[ 1973 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1972 Jun 18 1972 Sep 11 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations NW foot
1933 Nov 13 1934 Aug Confirmed 2 Historical Observations East submarine flank (Taketomi)
1894 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1860 Jul 7 1860 Jul 9 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1854 Jun 27 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1790 1793 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.



Synonyms
Oiakoba | Uyakuzhach | Araito | Araito-Fuji | Chachanupuri | Oyakoba-yama | Oyakobatska


Cones
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Osobaya Peak Cone 208 m 50° 49' 0" N 155° 38' 0" E
Parazit Cone 1023 m


Craters
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Taketomi Crater
Strombolian eruptions occurred from vents along a 2-km-long fissure on the NW flank of Alaid volcano in 1972. Explosive activity began on June 18 and was accompanied by the effusion of lava flows beginning on the 21st. By July 16, lava effusion dominated, producing a 1-km-long lava flow that reached the sea and formed a new peninsula. Explosive activity diminished prior to the end of the eruption on September 11.

Photo by A.M. Chirkov, 1972 (courtesy of Oleg Volynets, Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
Steam clouds pour above the front of a lava flow advancing into the Sea of Okhotsk on the NW flank of Alaid volcano in 1972. The flow, which originated from NW-flank fissures, traveled 1 km and created a new 1-sq-km peninsula. The 1972 eruption began with explosive activity on June 18 from a 2-km-long fissure. Explosive activity was accompanied by lava effusion beginning June 21. From July 16 until the end of the eruption on September 11, the dominant activity was lava effusion.

Photo by Yuri Doubik, 1972 (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
A volcanologist from the Institute of Volcanology in Petropavlovsk observes a lava fountain from a cinder cone on Alaid volcano in 1972. This eruption from the northernmost volcano in the Kuril Islands began on June 18 and lasted until September 11. A chain of small cinder cones was formed on a 2-km-long fissure on the lower NW flank of the volcano. Lava flows reached the sea and formed a new peninsula.

Photo by Yuri Doubik, 1972 (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
A dark, ash-rich eruption column rises above Alaid volcano on April 30, 1981, at the peak of an eruption that began on April 27. The eruption plume extended 2000 km to the SE. The highest and northernmost volcano of the Kuril Islands, 2339-m-high Alaid is a symmetrical stratovolcano when viewed from the north, but has a 1.5-km-wide summit crater that is breached to the south. Numerous pyroclastic cones dot the lower flanks of Alaid. Explosive eruptions in 1790 and 1981 were among the largest in the Kuril Islands.

Photo courtesy of Anatoli Khrenov, 1981 (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
The 1972 eruption of Alaid volcano in the northern Kuril Islands, seen here in August, was characterized by both explosive and effusive activity. A dark ash column towers above a small cinder cone that formed on a 2-km-long fissure on the NW flank, while white steam clouds rise from the margins of a lava flow that traveled 1 km into the Sea of Okhotsk. The eruption began on June 18 and was over by September 11.

Photo by A.M. Chirkov, 1972 (courtesy of Oleg Volynets, Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Gorshkov G S, 1958. Kurile Islands. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 7: 1-99.

Gorshkov G S, 1970. Volcanism and the Upper Mantle; Investigations in the Kurile Island Arc. New York: Plenum Publishing Corp, 385 p.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Murayama I, 1987. Volcanoes of Japan (I). Tokyo: Daimedo, 315 p (2nd edition, in Japanese).

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Pyroclastic cone(s)

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
Basalt / Picro-Basalt
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
0
64
64
2,887

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Alaid Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.