Ebeko

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 50.68°N
  • 156.02°E

  • 1156 m
    3792 ft

  • 290380
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

21 July-27 July 2010

On 23 July, KVERT reported that the Aviation Color Code level for Ebeko was lowered to Green. Visual observations and satellite data indicated no activity from the volcano during 16-23 July.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)



 Available Weekly Reports


2010: June | July
2009: February | March | April | May | June | July | October
2007: March
2006: February
2005: January | February | March | June | July | August | September


21 July-27 July 2010

On 23 July, KVERT reported that the Aviation Color Code level for Ebeko was lowered to Green. Visual observations and satellite data indicated no activity from the volcano during 16-23 July.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 June-6 July 2010

KVERT reported that, according to observers in Severo-Kurilsk about 7 km E, activity from Ebeko increased on 2 July. Explosions produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 1.8 km (5,900 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SSE. The Level of Aviation Color Code was raised to Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 October-3 November 2009

KVERT reported that on 26 October a gas-and-steam plume from Ebeko was seen by observers in Severo-Kurilsk, about 7 km E of Ebeko, rising 300 m above the crater and drifting 1-2 km NNE. There was no evidence of ash deposits on the snow cover. Gas-and-steam plumes rose 250 m above the crater and drifted 2 km E on 28 October and NNE on 29 October. The Level of Aviation Color Code remained at Green.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 October-27 October 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 26 October a possible eruption plume from Ebeko rose to an altitude of 8.8 km (29,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. Emissions continued the next day.

Source: Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


14 October-20 October 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 15 October a possible eruption plume from Ebeko rose to an altitude of 10.7 km (35,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE.

Source: Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 July-4 August 2009

On 31 July, KVERT reported that activity from Ebeko had remained at low levels since 13 July. The Level of Concern Color Code was lowered to Green.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 June-23 June 2009

KVERT reported that gas-and-steam plumes rose to an altitude of 1.7 km (5,600 ft) a.s.l. during 13-18 June. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 June-16 June 2009

KVERT reported that during 9-10 June gas-and-steam plumes from Ebeko rose to an altitude of 2.7 km (8,900 ft) a.s.l. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Yellow. Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from Yelizovo Airport, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 13 June an ash plume rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


20 May-26 May 2009

Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from Yelizovo Airport, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 22 May an ash plume from Ebeko rose to an altitude of 2.4 km (8,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE.

Source: Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 May-12 May 2009

KVERT reported that during 1-8 May observers from Severo-Kurilsk, about 7 km E of Ebeko, observed continued activity. Gas-and-steam plumes containing a small amount of ash were noted on 2 May. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Yellow. Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from Yelizovo Airport, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 9-11 May ash plumes rose to altitudes of 2.1-2.4 km (7,000-8,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW and SE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


29 April-5 May 2009

KVERT reported that during 24 April-1 May observers from Severo-Kurilsk, about 7 km E of Ebeko, observed continued activity. Gas-and-steam plumes with some ash content rose to an altitude of 3.5 km (11,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 6 km in multiple directions. On 23 April, a small amount of ash fell in Severo-Kurilsk. Satellite imagery revealed strips of ash deposits radiating from the crater in different directions on 29 and 30 April. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Yellow. Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from Yelizovo Airport, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 30 April an ash plume rose to an altitude of 1.8 km (6,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 20 km E.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 April-28 April 2009

KVERT reported that during 17-24 April observers from Severo-Kurilsk, about 7 km E of Ebeko, observed continued activity. Gas-and-steam plumes with some ash content rose to an altitude of 2 km (6,600 ft) a.s.l. during 17-19 April and drifted 8 km NE. On 22 April, light ash fell in Severo-Kurilsk. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Yellow. Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from Yelizovo Airport, the Tokyo VAAC reported that during 25-26 April ash plumes rose to altitudes of 1.2-2.1 km (4,000-7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted S, SW, and W.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


15 April-21 April 2009

KVERT reported that during 10-17 April observers from Severo-Kurilsk, about 7 km E of Ebeko, observed continued activity. Gas-and-steam plumes with some ash content rose to an altitude of 2.7 km (8,900 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 15 km SE. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Yellow. Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from Yelizovo Airport, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 17 April an ash plume drifted NE at an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


8 April-14 April 2009

KVERT reported that during 3-10 April observers from Severo-Kurilsk, about 7 km E of Ebeko, observed continued activity. Gas-and-steam plumes with some ash content rose to an altitude of 3.4 km (11,200 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 8 km in southerly directions. Light ashfall was reported in Severo-Kurilsk on 5 April. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Yellow. Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from Yelizovo Airport, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 12 April an ash plume drifted 6 km SE at an altitude of 1.5 km (5,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


1 April-7 April 2009

On 3 April, KVERT reported that the Level of Concern Color Code for Ebeko was raised to Yellow. Observers from Severo-Kurilsk, about 7 km E, reported increased activity; ash-and-gas plumes rose to an altitude of 3.2 km (10,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted about 20 km NW and E. Ashfall was reported in Severo-Kurilsk on 13, 29, and 31 March up to 0.2 cm thick. Since Ebeko is not monitored by seismic instruments, KVERT relies on visual observations and satellite images for monitoring.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 March-17 March 2009

Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from Yelizovo Airport, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 13 March an ash plume from Ebeko drifted E at an altitude of 0.6 km (2,000 ft) a.s.l.

Source: Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 February-17 February 2009

Based on analysis of satellite imagery and information from Yelizovo Airport, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 11 February an ash plume drifted NE from Ebeko at an altitude of 0.6 km (2,000 ft) a.s.l. On 17 February, an ash plume drifted SW at an altitude of 1.2 km (4,000 ft) a.s.l.

Source: Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


21 March-27 March 2007

According to a news article, gas-and-steam clouds from Ebeko rose to 1.3-1.5 km (4,100-4,800 ft) a.s.l. on 22 March. Nearby residents reported smelling sulfur and chlorine.

Source: RIA Novosti


22 February-28 February 2006

KVERT reported that no significant changes in activity at Ebeko had been seen on satellite imagery or via ground observations for several months, so the Concern Color Code was reduced from Yellow to Green, the lowest level. A weak scent of hydrogen sulfide and chlorine gas was sometimes noted in the town of Severo-Kurilsk, ~7 km from the volcano. Ebeko is not seismically monitored. According to KVERT, it is likely that activity will stay at low levels and an explosive eruption is not imminent in the next weeks.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 September-20 September 2005

Strong fumarolic activity continued at Ebeko's crater during 9-16 September. Ebeko remained at Concern Color Code Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 September-13 September 2005

On 9 September, KVERT raised the Concern Color Code at Ebeko from Green to Yellow due to an increase in activity at the volcano. Fumarolic activity increased at the Ebeko's crater, with gas temperatures of 480 degrees C.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 August-16 August 2005

KVERT reduced the Concern Color Code at Ebeko from Yellow to Green (the lowest level) during 5-12 August. Weak fumarolic activity was observed, and no volcanic activity was visible on satellite imagery during the report week.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 August-9 August 2005

During 3-9 August fumarolic activity continued at Ebeko.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 July-2 August 2005

KVERT raised the Concern Color Code at Ebeko around 29 July from Green to Yellow. During 22-29 July, new fumaroles were noted in the volcano's active crater, and an explosion in the crater emitted hot steam. These types of strong changes in the crater had not been observed since 1982.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


22 June-28 June 2005

The Russian Emergency Situations Ministry's Sakhalin department reported renewed activity at Ebeko. Emission clouds reportedly rose to a maximum height of 200 m above the crater and drifted SW.

Sources: Gazeta.ru News, RIA Novosti, Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 March-29 March 2005

There was no seismic activity at Ebeko during 18-25 March, so KVERT reduced the Concern Color Code from Yellow to Green, the lowest level.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 February-15 February 2005

On 7 February a small emission of steam, gas, and possibly ash from Ebeko rose ~1 km above the volcano's crater and drifted ~12 km SE. On 8 and 9 February plumes rose to 600 m and thin ash deposits were noted in the town of Severo-Kurilsk, ~7 km from the volcano. Ebeko remained at Concern Color Code Yellow .

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 February-8 February 2005

During 28 January to 4 February, heightened volcanic activity continued at Ebeko. On 1 February gas-and-steam plumes rose to 450 m above ~Ebeko's crater and drifted NE. Ebeko remained at Concern Color Code Yellow .

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 January-1 February 2005

Due to an increase in volcanic activity at Ebeko, on 30 January KVERT raised the Concern Color Code from Green to Yellow. On 27 and 28 January a strong sulfur scent was detected in the town of Severo-Kurilsk, ~7 km from Ebeko. On the 27th a gas-and-steam plume rose ~400 m above the volcano. During 28-29 January, a plume rose ~300 m above the vent on the on the NE side of the volcano's active crater. Ash deposits that were 2-3 mm thick were found 10 m from the vent. Ash extended about 500 m E. At this time a new 7x12-m turquoise lake emerged in the SW part of the active crater. The lake disappeared on 30 January, and there was intensive fumarolic activity where it had been. During the report period, shallow earthquakes were recorded at the Severo-Kurilsk seismic station.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2010 Jul 2 2010 Jul 9 ± 7 days Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2009 Feb 11 2009 Jul 13 (?) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2005 Jan 29 2005 Feb 16 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1991 Jan 1991 Jan Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Northern crater
1989 Feb 2 1990 Apr 15 ± 5 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Northern crater and upper east flank
1987 Oct 14 1988 Jan Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Northern crater
[ 1971 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 1   Northern crater
1969 Feb 1969 Feb (?) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Northern crater
1967 Jan 1967 Apr (?) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Northern crater
1965 Aug (?) 1965 Aug (?) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Middle Crater
1963 Mar 8 1964 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations North wall of east amphitheater
1934 Oct 4 1935 Oct 15 ± 45 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Sredniy crater
1859 Sep 27 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1833 Dec 31 ± 365 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1793 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1670 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
1650 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
1600 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
0390 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Braitseva O A, Melekestsev I V, Ponomareva V V, Sulerzhitsky L D, 1995. Ages of calderas, large explosive craters and active volcanoes in the Kuril-Kamchatka region, Russia. Bull Volc, 57: 383-402.

Gorshkov G S, 1958. Kurile Islands. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 7: 1-99.

Gorshkov G S, 1970. Volcanism and the Upper Mantle; Investigations in the Kurile Island Arc. New York: Plenum Publishing Corp, 385 p.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Melekestsev I V, Dvigalo V N, Kiryanov V Y, Kurbatov A V, Nesmachnyi I A, 1994. Ebeko volcano, Kuril Islands: eruptive history and potential volcanic hazards, Part II. Volc Seism, 15: 411-430 (English translation).

Menyailov I A, Nikitina L P, Budnikov V A, 1992. Activity of Ebeko volcano in 1987-1991: character of eruptions, composition of erupted material, volcanic hazard for Severo-Kurilsk. Volc Seism, 1992(5-6): 21-33 (English translation 1993, 14: 515-531).

The flat-topped summit of the central cone of Ebeko volcano, one of the most active in the Kuril Islands, occupies the northern end of Paramushir Island. Three summit craters located along a SSW-NNE line form Ebeko volcano proper, at the northern end of a complex of five volcanic cones. Blocky lava flows extend west from Ebeko and SE from the neighboring Nezametnyi cone. The eastern part of the southern crater of Ebeko contains strong solfataras and a large boiling spring. The central crater of Ebeko is filled by a lake about 20 m deep whose shores are lined with steaming solfataras; the northern crater lies across a narrow, low barrier from the central crater and contains a small, cold crescentic lake. Historical activity, recorded since the late-18th century, has been restricted to small-to-moderate explosive eruptions from the summit craters. Intense fumarolic activity occurs in the summit craters of Ebeko, on the outer flanks of the cone, and in lateral explosion craters.