Chikurachki

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 50.325°N
  • 155.458°E

  • 1816 m
    5956 ft

  • 290360
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

17 September-23 September 2008

KVERT reported no ash plumes from Chikurachki during 1-19 September, although clouds mostly prevented satellite image views during 6-14 September. The Level of Concern Color Code was lowered to Green on 19 September.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)



 Available Weekly Reports


2008: July | August | September
2007: February | March | April | August | September | October | November
2005: March | April
2003: April | May | June | July
2002: January | February | March


17 September-23 September 2008

KVERT reported no ash plumes from Chikurachki during 1-19 September, although clouds mostly prevented satellite image views during 6-14 September. The Level of Concern Color Code was lowered to Green on 19 September.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 August-2 September 2008

KVERT reported that clouds mostly prevented satellite image views of Chikurachki during 22-29 August. No ash plumes were observed during times of clearer weather. The level of seismicity was unknown because Chikurachki lacks dedicated seismic instruments. The Level of Concern Color Code was lowered to Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 August-26 August 2008

KVERT reported that clouds prevented satellite image views of Chikurachki during 15-22 August. The level of seismicity was unknown because Chikurachki lacks dedicated seismic instruments. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 August-19 August 2008

KVERT reported that clouds prevented satellite image views of Chikurachki during 8-15 August. The level of seismicity was unknown because Chikurachki lacks dedicated seismic instruments. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 August-12 August 2008

Based on observations of satellite imagery, KVERT reported that eruptive activity from Chikurachki continued during 1-8 August. Ash plumes drifted more than 60 km SE, W, and N during 1-3 August. The level of seismicity was unknown because Chikurachki lacks dedicated seismic instruments. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 July-5 August 2008

Based on observations of satellite imagery, KVERT reported that during 30-31July ash plumes from Chikurachki drifted S. The level of seismicity was unknown because Chikurachki lacks dedicated seismic instruments. The Level of Concern Color Code was raised to Orange.

Based on reports from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 1 August, an ash plume rose to an altitude of 2.7 km (9,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


23 July-29 July 2008

Based on observations of satellite imagery, KVERT reported that on 29 July an ash plume from Chikurachki drifted more than 30 km WSW. The level of seismicity was unknown because Chikurachki lacks dedicated seismic instruments. The Level of Concern Color Code was raised to Yellow.

Based on reports from KVERT, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 29 July, an eruption plume rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


7 November-13 November 2007

KVERT reported that clouds obscured satellite views of Chikurachki during 2-9 November. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


31 October-6 November 2007

KVERT reported that clouds obscured satellite views of Chikurachki during 26 October-2 November. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


24 October-30 October 2007

KVERT reported that ash plumes from Chikurachki were visible on satellite imagery and drifted NW on 20 October. Clouds obscured views of the summit on other days during 19-26 October. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


17 October-23 October 2007

KVERT reported that ash plumes from Chikurachki were visible on satellite imagery and drifted NE on 17 and 18 October. Clouds obscured views of the summit on other days during 12-19 October. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


10 October-16 October 2007

KVERT reported that gas-and-ash plumes from Chikurachki were visible on satellite imagery and drifted NE on 7 and 10 October. Clouds obscured views of the summit on other days during 5-12 October. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


3 October-9 October 2007

KVERT reported that a gas-and-ash plume from Chikurachki was visible on satellite imagery drifting ESE on 4 October. Chikurachki volcano is not monitored with seismic instruments. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


26 September-2 October 2007

KVERT reported that explosions from Chikurachki produced gas-and-ash plumes that were visible on satellite imagery and drifted ESE on 21 September. Clouds obscured views of the summit during 22-28 September. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


19 September-25 September 2007

KVERT reported that explosions from Chikurachki produced ash plumes that were visible on satellite imagery and drifted SE during 18-19 September. Clouds obscured views of the summit during 15-17 and 20-21 September. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


12 September-18 September 2007

KVERT reported that explosions from Chikurachki produced ash plumes that were visible on satellite imagery drifting SE on 7 September and ESE on 8 September. Based on visual observations, ash plumes rose to an altitude of 2.3 km (7,500 ft) a.s.l. on 8 and 11 September. Clouds obscured views during 9-10 and 12-13 September. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


5 September-11 September 2007

Based on ground and aerial observations, KVERT reported that explosions from Chikurachki produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 3.2 km (9,800 ft) a.s.l. during 31 August-7 September. Ash plumes were visible on satellite imagery drifting NE on 31 August and 1 September, and S and SE on 3 September. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


29 August-4 September 2007

Based on visual observations, KVERT reported that explosions from Chikurachki produced ash plumes during 21-26 August. Ash plumes were visible on satellite imagery drifting NE during 28-30 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange. Based on observations of satellite imagery, the Tokyo VAAC reported that possible eruption plumes rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. during 1-3 September.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


22 August-28 August 2007

KVERT reported that visual observations of Chikurachki were inhibited by cloud cover during 22-24 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


15 August-21 August 2007

Based on observations of satellite imagery, an ash plume from Chikurachki drifted about 120 km to the SE on 19 August. KVERT raised the Level of Concern Color Code from Green to Orange. The Tokyo VAAC reported that ash plumes rose to altitudes of 4.3-5.2 km (14,000-17,000 ft) a.s.l. during 20-21 August, based on observations of satellite imagery and information from KVERT.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 April-1 May 2007

KVERT reported that no eruptive activity from Chikurachki was noted visually or on satellite imagery during 20-27 April. The Level of Concern Color Code was lowered to yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 April-24 April 2007

KVERT reported that bursts of volcanic bombs from Chikurachki were observed by hunters on 15 April. Ash plumes were seen on satellite imagery drifting SE on 14 April and WNW during 15-16 April. Ash plumes rose to altitudes of 3.8 km (12,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N on 18 April. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 April-10 April 2007

Based on satellite imagery, KVERT reported that an ash plume from Chikurachki drifted 200 km NE on 4 April. On 5 April, the Tokyo VAAC reported that a possible eruption plume to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. was seen on satellite imagery drifting N. Explosive activity continued on 9 April. On 10 April, KVERT set the Level of Concern Color Code to Orange.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


14 March-20 March 2007

AVO reported that a sulfur dioxide cloud from Chikurachki was seen on satellite imagery on 16 March extending 580 km NW. The altitude of the cloud was unknown.

Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)


7 March-13 March 2007

During 11-12 March, a diffuse ash plume from Chikurachki was seen on satellite imagery drifting E. The plume rose to an estimated altitude of below 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l.

Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)


28 February-6 March 2007

On 4 March, weak ash explosions from Chikurachki were reported by residents of Podgorny village (Paramushir Island), about 20 km SSE. On 5 March, observers reported a continuous ash column to an altitude of 3.4 km (11,000 ft) a.s.l.

Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)


20 April-26 April 2005

During 15-22 April, satellite imagery of Chikurachki lacked a thermal anomaly or ash plumes, so KVERT reduced the Concern Color Code from Orange to Yellow.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 April-19 April 2005

On 7 April, an ash-and-gas plume rose to ~500 m above Chikurachki's crater (~7,600 ft a.s.l.) and extended ~10 km S. During 7-15 April, Chikurachki remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


6 April-12 April 2005

During 4-5 April, weak fumarolic activity occurred at Chikurachki. Ash deposits covered the WNW slope of the volcano. During 1-8 April, Chikurachki remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 March-5 April 2005

Ash from Chikurachki fell on the southern part of Paramushir Island on 29 March. Ash deposits were visible on satellite imagery on 25 and 29 March. Deposits on the 29th extended 19 km SE. Chikurachki remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 March-29 March 2005

On 25 March, KVERT raised the Concern Color Code at Chikurachki from Yellow to Orange. On 23 March, satellite imagery showed a weak ash plume extending ~70 km (~44 mi) E of the volcano. The height of the plume was unknown. The Concern Color Code was originally raised from Green to Yellow on 12 March when explosions were first noted. Chikurachki is not monitored with seismic instruments. KVERT has satellite data and occasional visual observations of the volcano.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


9 March-15 March 2005

Increased volcanic activity at Chikurachki on 12 March led KVERT to raise the Concern Color Code from Green to Yellow. Prior to the increase in Concern Color Code, on 1 March observers in Severo-Kurilsk (~70 km NE of Chikurachki) saw a gas-and-steam plume rise ~400 m above the volcano. On 12 March MODIS satellite imagery showed an ash plume extending NNW from the volcano. Chikurachki last erupted during April to June 2003.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


2 July-8 July 2003

The Concern Color Code at Chikurachki was reduced from Orange to Yellow during 27 June- 4 July. No eruptive activity was visible on satellite imagery during the report period and the volcano is not seismically monitored.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


25 June-1 July 2003

During 17-25 June, only gas-and-steam emissions were observed at Chikurachki. No signs of volcanic activity were seen on satellite imagery during 25-26 June, possibly marking a break in the eruption according to KVERT. The level of seismicity was unknown because Chikurachki is not monitored with seismic instruments. Chikurachki remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


18 June-24 June 2003

Volcanism continued at moderate levels at Chikurachki through 18 June. On 15 and 16 June steady ash plumes were observed that were bent down the volcano's flanks by strong winds. Chikurachki remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


11 June-17 June 2003

The eruption at Chikurachki that began on 18 April continued through 13 June, with ash plumes rising to heights less than 500 m above the volcano. During the report week, ash fell on the Podgorny settlement, ~20 km SSE of the volcano, and narrow plumes were visible on satellite imagery. Chikurachki remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


4 June-10 June 2003

The eruption that began at Chikurachki on 18 April continued during 30 May to 6 June, with several explosions occurring. The highest rising ash plume was emitted on 28 May at 0900, rose 4 km above the crater, and drifted NE. An eruption on the afternoon of 29 May sent an ash plume to a height of 1.2 km above the crater and deposited ash on the town of Severo-Kurilsk. Chikurachki remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


28 May-3 June 2003

The eruption that began at Chikurachki on 18 April continued during 23-28 May. Ash from an eruption began to fall on the Shelekhov settlement on 27 May at 1800. Ash plumes rose ~1 km above the volcano and drifted NE. Plumes were occasionally visible on satellite imagery. Chikurachki remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


21 May-27 May 2003

The eruption that began at Chikurachki on 18 April continued during 16-23 May. On 17 and 18 May ash-rich plumes were visible on satellite imagery drifting SW and NE, respectively. Chikurachki remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


14 May-20 May 2003

The eruption that began at Chikurachki on 18 April continued through 16 May. Satellite imagery showed several clouds, inferred to contain steam, gas, and ash. On 13 May ash deposits were seen on the volcano's ENE through SSE flanks, extending to the coast. Chikurachki remained at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


7 May-13 May 2003

The eruption that began at Chikurachki on 18 April continued through 9 May. On 1 May ash fell in the town of Severo-Kurilsk, ~60 km from the volcano. On 3 May weak fumarolic activity was seen, and on 5 May an ash-rich plume was observed extending to the NW. Chikurachki was at Concern Color Code Orange.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 April-6 May 2003

Chikurachki began erupting on 18 April 2003 and the eruption was clearly continuing through 25 April. Associated ash plumes were over 100 km long.

During this week, 30 April-6 May, the Tokyo VAAC issued ash advisories on Chikurachki plumes for aviators. Early in the week the critical visual and satellite observations remained ambiguous with respect to the presence of ash in the atmosphere. On 2 May (at 1934 UTC) U.S. Airforce meteorologists detected Chikurachki ash emissions at ~3 km altitude and moving ESE at ~50 km/hour.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


23 April-29 April 2003

Chikurachki, a volcano located on Paramushir Island in the North Kuriles, began erupting on 18 April 2003. A KVERT update for 25 April stated that the eruption continued and satellite data confirmed that ash plumes had moved SE and occasionally E during 22-25 April. The plumes attained lengths over 100 km. On 22 April observers at Vasiliev Cape on Paramushir Island saw a white gas-steam plume rise 500 m above the volcano's crater.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


16 April-22 April 2003

Chikurachki stratovolcano, located on Paramushir Island in the Northern Kuriles, began erupting on 18 April 2003. During the next few days observers described the ash falls and substantial plumes with estimated heights up to ~10 km altitude. Observers on Paramushir island saw ash explosions on 18 April; ash fell in Podgorny town and Cape Vasiliev. Satellite data for 18 April revealed that ash plumes moved towards the SSE and traveled a distance of more than 50 km. The Aviation Meteorological Center at Yelizovo airport reported that on 19 April ash plumes rose 2,000 m. Three distinct eruptive events were detected in satellite data on 19 April, in one case ash plumes extended over 50 km SE.

The longest reported plume of the week occurred on 20 April; it reached over 250 km from the volcano towards the SE, later blowing E. Satellite analysts described a variety of plumes on 21 April: a narrow ash plume (visible ~130 km in length and trending SE), a comparatively wide ash plume (~ 25 km wide at a distance of ~50 km from the volcano), and some other ash plumes (over 50-70 km in length moving to the S). One reason why this eruption and its plumes are important is because they lie along a frequently traveled aviation route.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


13 March-19 March 2002

Based on reports received from the town of Severo-Kurilsk, KVERT reported a continuation through 16 March of volcanism that began at Chikurachki on 25 January. On the 16th during 0700 to late evening ash fell in Podgorny settlement, ~20 km SE of the volcano. On a reconnaissance helicopter flight during 1100-1300, observers saw constant gas emissions and sustained ash explosions that rose 200 m above the volcano and extended more than 100 km SE.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


27 February-5 March 2002

Reports from the town of Severo-Kurilsk revealed that renewed activity occurred at Chikurachki during 23-27 February. On 25, 26, and 27 February ash plumes occasionally rose above the crater and ash fell in the vicinity of Tukharka River. In addition, snow melted very quickly near the volcano. On [28] February an ash plume rose a short distance above the volcano and drifted to the NNE. During the report period several clouds were visible on AVHRR satellite imagery that may have been composed of gas and steam released from the volcano.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


20 February-26 February 2002

According to reports KVERT received from the town of Severo-Kurilsk (~70 km NE of the volcano), volcanism that began at Chikurachki on 25 January had decreased by 20 February. Visual observations from a helicopter on 18 February revealed that a small new crater had formed in the SSE part of the volcano's summit crater. A gas-and-steam plume was visible rising 150 m above the crater and extending to the ESE. A stripe of fresh ash was visible on the volcano's E slope. No thermal anomaly or ash plume was visible on satellite imagery. KVERT reported that the possibility of ash explosions occurring remained. According to the Tokyo VAAC, possible eruptions on 21 February at 0325 and 24 February at 1232 may have produced ash clouds that rose to ~6 and 5.8 km, respectively.

Sources: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 February-12 February 2002

The volcanism that began at Chikurachki on 25 January continued through 8 February. On 7 February a hunter observed a persistent ash column reaching ~2.5 km a.s.l. The volcano is not visible from the closest town, Severo-Kurilsk, and there are no seismic stations on Paramushir Island.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


30 January-5 February 2002

An eruption that began at Chikurachki on 25 January deposited ash in the town of Severo-Kurilsk between 1200 and 1500. On 2 February at 1200 an eruption was observed by a helicopter pilot. An ash column from the eruption rose 300 m above the crater and drifted more than 70 km SE. There are no seismic stations at the volcano, therefore, no Color Concern Code was assigned by KVERT.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2008 Jul 29 2008 Aug 8 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2007 Aug 19 2007 Nov 1 ± 7 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2007 Mar 4 2007 Apr 18 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2005 Mar 12 2005 Apr 7 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2003 Apr 17 2003 Jul 3 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2002 Jan 25 2002 Apr 22 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations SSE part of summit crater
1986 Nov 18 1986 Dec 7 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
1973 Aug 10 1973 Sep 28 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1967 Sep 6 1967 Sep 20 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1964 Feb 1 1964 Feb Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1961 May 2 1961 Aug 10 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1958 May 26 1958 May 27 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1957 May Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1933 Apr 15 ± 45 days ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1853 Dec 1859 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1690 ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Tatarinov

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Gorshkov G S, 1958. Kurile Islands. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 7: 1-99.

Gorshkov G S, 1970. Volcanism and the Upper Mantle; Investigations in the Kurile Island Arc. New York: Plenum Publishing Corp, 385 p.

Gurenko A A, Belousov A B, Trumbull R B, Sobolev A V, 2005. Explosive basaltic volcanism of the Chikurachki volcano (Kurile arc, Russia): insights on pre-eruptive magmatic conditions and volatile budget revealed from phenocryst-hosted melt inclusions and groundmass glasses. J Volc Geotherm Res, 147: 203-232.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Ovsyannikov A A, Muraviev Y D, 1992. The 1986 eruption of Chikurachki volcano. Volc Seism, 1992(5-6): 3-20 (English tranlation 1993, 14: 493-514).

Chikurachki, the highest volcano on Paramushir Island in the northern Kuriles, is actually a relatively small cone constructed on a high Pleistocene volcanic edifice. Oxidized basaltic-to-andesitic scoria deposits covering the upper part of the young cone give it a distinctive red color. Frequent basaltic plinian eruptions have occurred from Chikurachki during the Holocene. Lava flows from 1816-m-high Chikurachki reached the sea and form capes on the NW coast; several young lava flows also emerge from beneath the scoria blanket on the eastern flank. The Tatarinov group of six volcanic centers is located immediately to the south of Chikurachki. In contrast to the frequently active Chikurachki, the Tatarinov volcanoes are extensively modified by erosion and have a more complex structure. Tephrochronology gives evidence of only one eruption in historical time from Tatarinov, although its southern cone contains a sulfur-encrusted crater with fumaroles that were active along the margin of a crater lake until 1959.