Kharimkotan

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 49.12°N
  • 154.508°E

  • 1145 m
    3756 ft

  • 290300
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

13 January-19 January 2010

SVERT reported that a thermal anomaly from Kharimkotan's Severgin cone was detected by satellite on 15 January.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)



 Available Weekly Reports


2010: January


13 January-19 January 2010

SVERT reported that a thermal anomaly from Kharimkotan's Severgin cone was detected by satellite on 15 January.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1933 Jan 8 1933 Apr 14 (in or after) Confirmed 5 Historical Observations Severgin
1931 Sep Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Severgin
1883 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Severgin
1848 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Severgin
1846 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Severgin
1713 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Severgin

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Belousova M, 1996. The 1933 large scale sector failure and accompanying eruption of Harimkotan volcano (Kurile Islands). Pan-Pacific Hazards Conf, Vancouver, Abs.

Gorshkov G S, 1958. Kurile Islands. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 7: 1-99.

Gorshkov G S, 1970. Volcanism and the Upper Mantle; Investigations in the Kurile Island Arc. New York: Plenum Publishing Corp, 385 p.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Vlasov G M, 1967. Kamchatka, Kuril, and Komandorskiye Islands: geological description. In: {Geol of the USSR}, Moscow, 31: 1-827.

The 8 x 12 km island of Kharimkotan (also spelled Harimkotan) in the northern Kuriles consists of a stratovolcano cut by two breached depressions on the east and NW sides. These horseshoe-shaped craters were formed by slope failure, which produced debris-avalanche deposits that form large broad peninsulas on the east and NW coasts. Evidence of additional slope failures followed by plinian eruptions are found in sea cliffs of the island. Historical explosive eruptions have occurred since the early 18th century. A central cone, Severgin, was largely destroyed during the 1933 eruption, one of the largest in the Kuril Islands during historical time. Impact of a debris avalanche into the sea from the collapse of Severgin produced a tsunami that swept the island's coast and reached Onekotan and Paramushir Islands, killing two persons. A large lava dome emplaced during the 1933 eruption now fills the head of the eastern crater.