Rasshua

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 47.77°N
  • 153.02°E

  • 956 m
    3136 ft

  • 290220
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

6 February-12 February 2013

SVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Rasshua was detected in satellite images on 6 February.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)



 Available Weekly Reports


2013: February


6 February-12 February 2013

SVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Rasshua was detected in satellite images on 6 February.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1957 Oct Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1846 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Eastern cone ?

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Erlich E N, 1986. Geology of the calderas of Kamchatka and Kurile Islands with comparison to calderas of Japan and the Aleutians, Alaska. U S Geol Surv Open-File Rpt, 86-291: 1-300.

Gorshkov G S, 1958. Kurile Islands. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 7: 1-99.

Gorshkov G S, 1970. Volcanism and the Upper Mantle; Investigations in the Kurile Island Arc. New York: Plenum Publishing Corp, 385 p.

The elongated 6 x 13 km island of Rasshua in the central Kuriles contains three overlapping central cones within a 6 km caldera whose eastern margin is beyond the shoreline. An eroded central cone was constructed during the late Pleistocene, along with an isolated cone near the NW coast. Two Holocene cones were built within the crater of the central cone. The westernmost forms the 956 m high point of the island and is the source of lava flows that flooded the crater floor and descended to the coast. The easternmost cone, active during historical time, is truncated by a 500-m-wide crater that is breached to the SE. This crater may have formed during a violent eruption in 1846. The only other known historical eruption produced weak explosions in 1957. Fumarolic activity continues in the eastern crater and in the saddle between the two summit cones.